Author Topic: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table  (Read 9434 times)

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Offline Van G

  • Posts: 34
Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« on: May 31, 2015, 10:33 PM »
Would like to build a table for our Big Joe (like Big Green Egg) and wanted to get a few ideas for the top and drawers.

Will use western red cedar for frame but don't think it is durable enough for the top and drawers.

Have seen a number of tables built from Eucalyptus but don't think I can source locally.

Table will be on wheels and be covered (BBQ cover) when not in use.

Any suggestions on top material/finish for long lasting food application? Not cutting meat on it but grease/sauce stains.

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Offline deepcreek

  • Posts: 646
    • TimberFire Studio
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2015, 11:33 PM »
There's only one answer in my opinion.  Stainless steel.

Find a restaurant fabricator and have them do it with a marine edge.  They can also fab the drawers for you.
Joe Adams
TimberFire Studio
Houston, Texas

http://www.facebook.com/timberfire

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3604
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2015, 01:14 AM »
There's only one answer in my opinion.  Stainless steel.


Ya, I agree with this program. Have had all sorts of wooden tables outside, cedar, redwood, teak, Ipe and they all need to be treated/refinished every 6 months or so, otherwise they turn silver and become rough to the touch and stain easily.

I added a stainless side table surface to my grill and after 11 years you just wipe it off and you're done. You can cut on it (if you're carefull with your knives), put steaming hot pans on it, spill on it, the stuff just works.

Offline Van G

  • Posts: 34
Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2015, 12:55 PM »
Thanks for the replies. Will see if I can locate fabricator here in Toronto.

Stone like granite or Quartz would likely be similarly priced.

How do I frame to accept the top? Cross members along apron every 16" or so?

Offline HDClown

  • Posts: 87
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2015, 02:49 PM »
I was just looking into SS countertop prices as I have a section outside where I want to install a countertop. Cheapest prices I could fine for SS counter top pieces worked out to $60-65/sq ft for 304SS.  You can granite starting in the $25/sq ft range, of course, it gets more expensive pretty quickly, and you can easily be at $60-65/sq ft like the SS.  However, that's all up to you on what kind of granite you want.  You could easily stay on the low end.  I just couldn't find fabricated SS any cheaper than that $60/sq ft mark.


Offline fperra

  • Posts: 16
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2015, 03:23 PM »
Make a cement top for the egg. I have an extra larg and a large BGE and I poured a cement top for them. Here's what it looks like:


Offline Van G

  • Posts: 34
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2015, 06:06 PM »
I've seen a few DIY on pouring cement top but lack the tools for doing edging or polish. 

Did you cut out your holes or template and pour?

Offline fperra

  • Posts: 16
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2015, 06:48 PM »
Template and pour.

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3472
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2015, 08:16 PM »
Make a cement top for the egg. I have an extra larg and a large BGE and I poured a cement top for them. Here's what it looks like:

That looks very nice.
Why 2 cookers, one for turkey and one for ribs...?
Tim

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2345
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2015, 09:45 PM »
Make a cement top for the egg. I have an extra larg and a large BGE and I poured a cement top for them. Here's what it looks like:


I really like your cement top, why didn't you make it longer to get more work space?

Jack

Offline Van G

  • Posts: 34
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2015, 10:33 PM »
How did you get edges rounded and top polished?

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3604
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2015, 09:03 AM »
@fperra
Nice job on the concrete pour. Is that made from the lightweight GFRC version of concrete that's made specifically for countertops by Buddy Rhodes & Fu-Tung Cheng?

What did you use to join the 2 slabs together in the middle?

Offline deepcreek

  • Posts: 646
    • TimberFire Studio
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2015, 09:12 AM »
Thanks for the replies. Will see if I can locate fabricator here in Toronto.

Stone like granite or Quartz would likely be similarly priced.

How do I frame to accept the top? Cross members along apron every 16" or so?

For stainless, I would install a doubled up 3/4" plywood deck and stick the stainless down with silicone.  Weight it and clamp while drying.

Have the stainless fabricated with a 1-5/8 edge.

In my experience, commercial stainless fabricators who specialize in restaurants are much less expensive than the residential ones who do kitchen counters.
Joe Adams
TimberFire Studio
Houston, Texas

http://www.facebook.com/timberfire

Offline fperra

  • Posts: 16
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2015, 11:30 AM »
How did you get edges rounded and top polished?

The edges came out of the mold that way. I made the mold out of 3/4" white melamine and ran a bead of silicone along the bottom edges of the mold to get the rounded edges.

@fperra
Nice job on the concrete pour. Is that made from the lightweight GFRC version of concrete that's made specifically for countertops by Buddy Rhodes & Fu-Tung Cheng?

What did you use to join the 2 slabs together in the middle?

Standard weight concrete from Lowes. The top is re enforced with rebar. I made it in two pieces because the weight of a single slab would be too much for two old guys with bad backs to lift. [big grin] The two slabs are connected with a stainless steel bar between them and glued with epoxy. 


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3604
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2015, 01:18 PM »
@fperra
A lot of clever ideas here, melamine for a smooth surface finish & ease of release, silicone caulk for the radius, the SST bar with epoxy.  [thumbs up]

I can especially appreciate the old guys with bad backs statement.

Offline Van G

  • Posts: 34
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #15 on: June 02, 2015, 01:51 PM »
Cool. If I don't need special equip to edge and wet polish then concrete is a cool top.

Did you use melamine strips for the sides and radius for Kamado?

Offline fperra

  • Posts: 16
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2015, 02:23 PM »
Cool. If I don't need special equip to edge and wet polish then concrete is a cool top.

Did you use melamine strips for the sides and radius for Kamado?

Yes, melamine for the sides and the form screwed together so it can be taken apart to release the concrete. For the holes I used 2" thick foam insulation from Lowes. After you cut the foam circle to the size you need, wrap the edges with packing tape so the concrete doesn't stick. I did wet polish my top, but you could get by without that if you use a finer concrete mix. There is a lot of information on youtube about making concrete counter tops.

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1958
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #17 on: June 03, 2015, 11:32 AM »
The early Big Green Egg tables were made from Cypress, which can be fairly rot resistant if the right boards are chosen for the project.  Now, I think they went Tropical on their Wood selection, and want even more money for the tables.
 I've refinished a few of the Cypress Tables, I use Sikkens Cetol Marine Finish on them. No need to refinish or touch up every few months, and a lot of stuff can be removed with a damp cloth if the finish is still on decent shape.  Cypress isn't that expensive of a wood either usually. I use 5/4 for top boards or maybe 6/4 to match what BGE built in their tables.  Sometimes I run boards through my lunchbox planer to match an odd thickness after sanding original tops.
 The support boards for the Eggs themselves on the bottom are always much thicker than the table tops and I added more bracing than BGE did when the tables were new.
 If you want to go the Stainless steel or Concrete route for a top, I can see all the pros of doing so.  :)
 If you do decide to build a wood top, please screw the boards from the bottom side of the table, taking care not to pop out through the boards with too long of a screw.
 The boards will look better without screw heads all over the place on topside, and you prevent water from sitting in the screwhead depressions .
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Van G

  • Posts: 34
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #18 on: June 04, 2015, 11:27 PM »
Got a few quotes on 16GA and 18GA 304 SS and its running at about $600-700 based on a 3x8 and 4x8 sheet. Little steep.

Concrete have the longevity? Since it's always getting stronger I'll assume it will last the test of time and maintenance would consist of resealing every couple years.

Looking at something like 36" wide x 72"-88" long.

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1958
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2015, 08:26 AM »
Got a few quotes on 16GA and 18GA 304 SS and its running at about $600-700 based on a 3x8 and 4x8 sheet. Little steep.

Concrete have the longevity? Since it's always getting stronger I'll assume it will last the test of time and maintenance would consist of resealing every couple years.

Looking at something like 36" wide x 72"-88" long.
  Another way to go with Stainless steel is modifiying a used Restaurant or Hospital Table that you buy from a salvage or other type place. You can cut the table top with an abrasive saw, smooth out your cut line, and polish the top a bit if needed.
  As far as Stainless steel sheets that are new, which grade are you being quoted,
 2B, 3B, 4B, ie, what finish is on the raw sheet?
 2B is usually the cheapest since it's very raw and a dull grey that will get dressed up in the finishing process once the material is done being fabricated into whatever it's being used for.
 Higher, prefinished grades are covered with a plastic protective sheet that gets peeled off during the building process, but you are paying for that prefinished material since it was more money to process that sheet at the mill.
 Is wood still an option for you? 
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Van G

  • Posts: 34
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #20 on: June 05, 2015, 08:59 AM »
Quoted 304 #4 - brush finish

I'm back to wood top - cedar base and harder species top. Would prefer solid top but glue up may not hold outside.

This will be on wheels and covered when not in use so it will see little rain or snow.

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1958
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #21 on: June 05, 2015, 12:22 PM »
Quoted 304 #4 - brush finish

I'm back to wood top - cedar base and harder species top. Would prefer solid top but glue up may not hold outside.

This will be on wheels and covered when not in use so it will see little rain or snow.
  The two Table by BGE that I've redone so far did not have glued tops, instead, close fitting boards that allowed for water swelling of the wood, and were only fastened to the frame by the screws under the frame boards, into the top boards.
 White Oak will take water/moisture well, but is a open pore wood, so I don't know if you want that look.
 Makore, Mahogany, Cypress, Black Locust all come to mind, maybe Larch might work for you if you finish it well to help seal it.
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Van G

  • Posts: 34
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #22 on: June 05, 2015, 02:42 PM »
Was thinking Ipe or other tropical in deck boards (5/4, edge relieved). Put them at 1/8 or 1/4 spacing and just have plastic trays and butcher block for food management. Hit Ipe and cedar frame with appropriate oil and should be good for a couple years.

The pour in place edging systems from ZCounter and the likes are intriguing for concrete top.

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1958
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #23 on: June 05, 2015, 04:44 PM »
Was thinking Ipe or other tropical in deck boards (5/4, edge relieved). Put them at 1/8 or 1/4 spacing and just have plastic trays and butcher block for food management. Hit Ipe and cedar frame with appropriate oil and should be good for a couple years.

The pour in place edging systems from ZCounter and the likes are intriguing for concrete top.
  Ipe is usually not cheap, what price are you being quoted locally.
 Oiling will look nice, but not work well against UV rays unless the oil has an additive for this in it[some do].  Usually, you end up recoating more often with exterior oil finishes more than you'd expect to.
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Van G

  • Posts: 34
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #24 on: June 05, 2015, 08:46 PM »
I've already got some 5/4 x 6" boards (maybe 18') so I could use that and add to or keep it for another outdoor project.

I know Mahogany is similar price to Ipe here in Toronto. Will have to give GoodFellow a call on the others.

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1958
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #25 on: June 05, 2015, 08:59 PM »
I've already got some 5/4 x 6" boards (maybe 18') so I could use that and add to or keep it for another outdoor project.

I know Mahogany is similar price to Ipe here in Toronto. Will have to give GoodFellow a call on the others.
. Okay- Keep us informed... [cool]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2345
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #26 on: June 05, 2015, 09:21 PM »
I've already got some 5/4 x 6" boards (maybe 18') so I could use that and add to or keep it for another outdoor project.

I know Mahogany is similar price to Ipe here in Toronto. Will have to give GoodFellow a call on the others.
. Okay- Keep us informed... [cool]

Black Locust or White Oak would be my first two choices but Ipe and Mahogany (if you get the right species) would also be good woods for outdoors.

There must be over 30 different trees that yield mahogany wood and Ipe is a collection of tropical trees that yield similar wood some of the wood types twist and distort a lot.

Jack

Offline wkearney99

  • Posts: 65
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #27 on: June 09, 2015, 11:24 AM »
What finish/polish/sealer are you putting on the concrete top?

I've likewise got an XL BGE.  And for those that don't have one, it's like the money spent on Festool.  You question whether it'd really be worth THAT much money... until you get one and seriously question why you didn't get it sooner.  I use mine for both grilling and smoking; and the occasional pizza party.  With an adjustable rig and two stones you can do 13"-sized pies in 3-5 minutes, depending on the toppings.

I've got 14' along the side of a patio that I'd like to set up as some sort of outdoor 'kitchen' for the BGE and a gas grill.  But it's in full south-facing sun and I'm a bit concerned about how hot/humid it'll get inside.  I've got a resin cabinet nearby and that gets upwards of 125F inside.  Makes for problems grabbing metal implements or anything temperature sensitive (citronella candle puddles).  That and dealing with how crud just magically accumulates inside (airborne dust, grime, grass clippings, etc) make me want to find drawers/doors that can help keep that out.  But then we're back to the hot/humid box problems.

Offline Van G

  • Posts: 34
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #28 on: June 09, 2015, 11:41 AM »
What finish/polish/sealer are you putting on the concrete top?

I've likewise got an XL BGE.  And for those that don't have one, it's like the money spent on Festool.  You question whether it'd really be worth THAT much money... until you get one and seriously question why you didn't get it sooner.  I use mine for both grilling and smoking; and the occasional pizza party.  With an adjustable rig and two stones you can do 13"-sized pies in 3-5 minutes, depending on the toppings.

I've got 14' along the side of a patio that I'd like to set up as some sort of outdoor 'kitchen' for the BGE and a gas grill.  But it's in full south-facing sun and I'm a bit concerned about how hot/humid it'll get inside.  I've got a resin cabinet nearby and that gets upwards of 125F inside.  Makes for problems grabbing metal implements or anything temperature sensitive (citronella candle puddles).  That and dealing with how crud just magically accumulates inside (airborne dust, grime, grass clippings, etc) make me want to find drawers/doors that can help keep that out.  But then we're back to the hot/humid box problems.

I've been looking at Z Forms Edges and Seal. For pour in place on wheeled table, I am contemplating using ply or boards instead of concrete board they use in their projects.

Offline Chris Wong

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  • I make sculptural furniture.
    • Flair Woodworks
Re: Exterior Wood for Furniture - Table
« Reply #29 on: June 26, 2015, 11:11 AM »
How about locust?
Chris Wong, http://FlairWoodworks.com

The thoughts and ideas expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of http://UltimateTools.ca.  But Dan does say "hello".