Author Topic: Getting better edge banding results  (Read 5822 times)

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Offline ryanjg117

  • Posts: 111
Getting better edge banding results
« on: August 25, 2015, 08:55 PM »
Relatively new to edge banding and just finished a custom closet using prefinished birch plywood with a roll of prefinished birch edge banding. The type of edge banding I used included the heat-activated glue backing. I applied with a hot iron, back-rubbed it with a wood block, and then trimmed the excess with a FastCap Quad Blade Trimmer. While the results weren't horrible, there is some light fraying (tear-out) and some of the glue has come out of the seams and is visible on the veneer. I can sand it off, but with the thin veneer of the plywood, I often end up accidentally sanding through the veneer. Wondering if I should ditch the Quad Trimmer and just use a straight-edge, and how I might be able to clean up that glue without having to sand. (Isopropyl alcohol?)

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Offline Steve Rowe

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Re: Getting better edge banding results
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2015, 09:37 PM »
On wood veneer edgebanding, I would ditch the quad trimmer.  These trimmers work extremely well with PVC edgebanding but always tear the grain on wood banding.  This is not unique to the Fastcap product as I also have a Freud unit and it is equally bad on wood.  I also tried a trimmer called a Bandit and it was even worse with wood banding. 

For a manual trimmer, IMO the best is the Varikant trimmer which works pretty well since you can adjust direction of cut very easily.  This works very similar to a wood chisel but doesn't have the handle limitations.  Of course the best and most expensive option is the MFK700 trimmer.  I then remove any excess glue with a scraper.  Some solvents just make the glue a mess so I gave up on that a long time ago but YMMV.

Offline Dbn107

  • Posts: 19
Re: Getting better edge banding results
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2015, 11:58 PM »
I'd echo what Steve said about the trimmers working poorly on real wood.  We use a lot of the pre-finished maple and I found the best for me is to use a single edge razor blade partially buried in a small wood block.  Its tough to easily explain, I'll try and attach the video where I stole the idea from.  The nice thing is you can skew the blade a little to get a slight angle on the cut.  It works and is very cheap.  For the glue squeeze out try experimenting with the temperature sometimes the highest setting melts the glue so much it squeezes out more then is needed to get adequate adhesion.  Otherwise with the pre finished ply I usually try and scrape the glue while its still hot, its sometimes easy enough to use your fingernail.  Or a fine scotchbrite pad.


Offline Chris Wong

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Re: Getting better edge banding results
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2015, 12:21 AM »
The reason that tools that trim two edges simultaneously don't work well is because inevitably, one cutter is going against the grain and one is going with it.  I find that a sharp plane blade does a good job.  If you have a lot to do, have a look at something like the Veritas Flush Plane or Veritas Cabinetmakers Trimming Plane.
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Offline JeremyH.

  • Posts: 196
Re: Getting better edge banding results
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2015, 11:21 PM »
Wood is certainly tough. I use a razor blade by hand and it takes some time to develop skills with it, but I've found it to offer better results than the little device made for it that was around. I'd like to try the wood block trick there.

Sadly with wood, no matter what, sometimes it screws up and you're doing it over again.

But I don't understand glue comments? I found that it's super easy to get off with a razor blade, and/or it comes off when you trim it. If I don't see squeeze out, the tape is probably going to come off.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3594
Re: Getting better edge banding results
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2015, 04:16 PM »
What about a thicker edge and then use a router to trim, like the 1010 with the edging plate, or a standard trim router (or MFK 700)?  I find it much harder to burn the veneer of the existing ply when there is more of an edge to sand.

Relatively new to edge banding and just finished a custom closet using prefinished birch plywood with a roll of prefinished birch edge banding. The type of edge banding I used included the heat-activated glue backing. I applied with a hot iron, back-rubbed it with a wood block, and then trimmed the excess with a FastCap Quad Blade Trimmer. While the results weren't horrible, there is some light fraying (tear-out) and some of the glue has come out of the seams and is visible on the veneer. I can sand it off, but with the thin veneer of the plywood, I often end up accidentally sanding through the veneer. Wondering if I should ditch the Quad Trimmer and just use a straight-edge, and how I might be able to clean up that glue without having to sand. (Isopropyl alcohol?)
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Offline Scorpion

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Re: Getting better edge banding results
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2016, 12:25 AM »

The reason that tools that trim two edges simultaneously don't work well is because inevitably, one cutter is going against the grain and one is going with it. 

For this reason I use the fastcap quad trimmer but only trim on edge at a time to prevent the tear out.  Also can't trim excess in a single pass of its more than 1/16th.  Follow those two rules and I've been successful frequently.

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Getting better edge banding results
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2016, 10:57 AM »
I have used a good quality bastard file, it must have a tooth on one edge. Other than using the OF 700 this is the fastest and easiest way to get a good edge particularly with wood veneer edge banding.
Technique is important. Much easier to show in a video than to describe, but essentially I just position the file at a 5-10 degree angle to the substrate and use a cutting motion forward (never back) to remove the excess banding. If you cut on a the back stroke it will sometimes pull the edging off or splinter into the just edged side.
I always wait till the glue has fully cooled off before I trim my banding so as not to spread any squeeze out it all over the surface. I go over the just ironed tape with a small block of hard maple applying pressure and kind of roll the edges slightly to make sure there is proper adhesion.
I have used chisels, Vertex, razor blades, and Olfa knife with the blade extended and none of them work as well, cleanly and as fast as a file particularly on veneered wood. I finish up with 220 sand paper on a block or wood on a 10 or 15 degree angle to the substrate and then spray a bit of lacquer or clear finish on the exposed edge. I use a razor and carefully remove any glue, but usually I don't get any on the surface or it gets removed with the file.
Hope that helps. Only practice makes you better, but it's worth it.
Tim
« Last Edit: January 09, 2016, 11:36 AM by Tim Raleigh »