Author Topic: Interesting hardware for inline splices?  (Read 1441 times)

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Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 207
Interesting hardware for inline splices?
« on: July 20, 2017, 07:38 PM »
I've got some LED tape light to put in underneath shelves.  The light itself will be hidden by the face-frame, but I'd like to hide the wires as best I can too.

Are there any interesting or well-suited connectors for splicing the wiring from the transformer to the LED tape?   And what do people use to keep the wires up and out of the way in this application?

Thanks,
Adam

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Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 4983
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Interesting hardware for inline splices?
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2017, 07:41 PM »
Where is the driver located?

Where are the wires to the tape entering the bottom of the cabinet from?

Why do you want to inline splice? Why not connect to the tape at an end?

Tom

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 207
Re: Interesting hardware for inline splices?
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2017, 09:36 PM »
The driver will be on the top of the bookcase, hidden behind trim.

Here's a mockup:

265957-0

My intention was to run the tape only behind the face frame, as opposed to wrapping it all the way to the back of the cabinet.  I figured I would run thermostat wire down the back and wire each shelf in parallel with the other shelves.  Plan was to penetrate the back of the cabinet just under the shelf and connect the tape to the wire via a pigtail connector, which would need to be spliced to the thermostat wire.  I figured an inline splice to the pigtail connector would be less visually obvious than wirenuts.

Thanks,
Adam


« Last Edit: July 20, 2017, 10:26 PM by mrFinpgh »

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 4983
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Interesting hardware for inline splices?
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2017, 09:45 PM »
The driver will be on the top of the bookcase, hidden behind trim.

Here's a mockup:


(Attachment Link)

My intention was to run the tape only behind the face frame, as opposed to wrapping it all the way to the back of the cabinet.  I figured I would run thermostat wire down the back and wire each shelf in parallel with the other shelves.  Plan was to penetrate the back of the cabinet just under the shelf and connect the tape to the wire via a pigtail connector, which would need to be spliced to the thermostat wire.  I figured an inline splice to the pigtail connector would be less visually obvious than wirenuts.

Thanks,
Adam

@mrFinpgh

Remove the photo, your personal info is visible.

No splice, use longer wire to get to the top. Use these connectors.

http://gmlighting.net/gm_final/data/_uploaded/product_files/LTR/SURE-TITE%20CONNECTOR%20SPEC%20SHEET.pdf

Use this channel to hide the wire. It comes in a darker color if needed.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Legrand-Wiremold-CordMate-Channel-White-C10/202059078

Tom

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 207
Re: Interesting hardware for inline splices?
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2017, 10:35 PM »
Thanks, Tom.  I don't know how that ended up being the image I uploaded.  Should be fixed, now.

Those both look like good solutions.   Thanks for suggesting them. 

Best,
Adam

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 431
Re: Interesting hardware for inline splices?
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2017, 10:42 PM »
I bought a bunch of connectors for the LED strips off of Amazon. Not nearly as nice with the screws as Tom's but they have been functioning well in a few houses for years now.

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 4983
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Interesting hardware for inline splices?
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2017, 11:29 PM »
I also recommend installing the LED tape in channels with lenses covering the LED's. This protects them while the casework is being dusted.

These LED tapes are in dual channels, 18" from the mirror inlaid into the top panel of the vanity.

I have no clue why the single strip of LED's is showing up in the picture---they don't exist.

Tom

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3132
Re: Interesting hardware for inline splices?
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2017, 01:04 PM »
I've used Molex connectors for almost 40 years. It's a crimp connection however it can also be soldered. They come in 2 different pin sizes and pins are available for wires from 14 through 30 gauge.
The pins can be removed from the housing and reinstalled in a different housing if you need to go from say a 2 pin connector to a 6 pin connector. The connectors are available as free hanging or panel mount.
Everything is relatively inexpensive except for the pin crimping tool.  [sad]

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 207
Re: Interesting hardware for inline splices?
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2017, 04:59 PM »
After all that, I decided it would be less stress to just solder all the connections.  :-)   It also gave me another opportunity to learn how to solder (I always seem to struggle with soldering anything.. be it plumbing connections or electronics).



Offline Naildrivingman

  • Posts: 192
Re: Interesting hardware for inline splices?
« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2017, 05:41 AM »

I have no clue why the single strip of LED's is showing up in the picture---they don't exist.

That is refraction from the camera lens.  Perfectly normal in most lenses until one enters the world of ultra high grade glass.  It is possibly also related to the mirror, but the lens for sure.
Dance with who brung ya...