Author Topic: Kitchen Ceiling  (Read 4397 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline johnleve

  • Posts: 120
Kitchen Ceiling
« on: December 08, 2015, 06:49 PM »
I have been debating for a while on what to do about my kitchen ceiling.  The house was built in 1930 and the original ceiling is plaster.  The 'wet' portion of the second floor is above the kitchen and it appears that from time-to-time there has been a need to get above the ceiling for repairs and modifications.  The plaster was in rough shape in appearance with the various patches.  I decided to cover it up with drywall directly over the top and had thought that at some point I would put up metal or pvc tiles.  Well it has been a year and I never mudded nor have I put up tiles.  I want to do some work on the bathroom above the kitchen but that is a while off at this point so want to have access to it while at the same time getting a finished look in the otherwise completely remodeled kitchen.

The solution that I am thinking would be best is a suspended ceiling but I don't want to loose much headroom and a lot of them are not very attractive.  I would remove the entirety of the current ceiling as the plan is for easy access and that would get me at least a couple of inches but not 6 or anything like that.  I ran across the following site and am thinking that I could so something very similar on my own.  Has anyone ever taken on such a project?  Does anyone have suggestions for alternatives?

Here is the manufactured product that brought the idea to mind: http://evobaideas.com/gallery/

The concept seems fairly easy to pull off but I wonder if I am not thinking of something that is going to cause difficulties in completing it.  If I do it myself I will make the panels a little larger or small than 2'x2' so they will the space as evenly as possible in at least one of the dimensions.

The one concern I do have would be fire.  Right now there is a very positive fire block between the floors- the plaster ceiling.  Removing that would not be ideal but then again suspended ceilings are used in many places so perhaps it really doesn't add up to much of an issue.  I believe the ceiling will be painted white so for the tiles I could use metal or maybe cut squares of gypsum board or maybe even tin tiles affixed to squares of gypsum if the 2x2 pattern would work out okay.  I have yet to dive into the building code but will be doing so before getting started, just wondering if there isn't that perfect solution that I am just unaware of.

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5767
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Kitchen Ceiling
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2015, 07:06 PM »

Offline chris s

  • Posts: 105
Re: Kitchen Ceiling
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2015, 09:37 AM »
Would it be possible to replace the plaster in the utility (tub ) area with sheetrock  Sealed to prevent air  movement . Then install a suspended ceiling. Kind of like a trap door under the suspended ceiling.
 I believe a normal 2x2 tile will work with a two inch clearance.

Offline johnleve

  • Posts: 120
Re: Kitchen Ceiling
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2015, 11:33 AM »
Thank you guys for the replies.

I am trying to wrap my head around the code, it seems to me that as long as the drop ceiling is fire rated, panels made of gypsum, and there is an alarm in the dead space I would be okay but I am still not sure.  There is also the issue of what the grid system is made of and whether or not that would have an impact on it.  I really want to make the grid out of wood and have it create depth in the ceiling, using a metal grid system is just not an option.  I believe the idea is that there needs to be a barrier so that if there was a fire on the first floor it cannot quickly spread to the underside of the second so anyone upstairs can walk on it to get out.

Putting up gypsum on the joists might work but I really want to have access to quite a bit of the space, in addition to the plumbing, which covers 1/2 of the area, another 1/4 has hydronic heating plumbing.  Basically I would like to have access to 75% of the ceiling space.  I also would like to replace the radiator with floor heating which is another reason I want to have access to as much of the area as is possible.

I will probably call the city inspector and see if I can get a straight answer as to what they would like to see in a suspended ceiling.  If I cannot find a way to make that work I will probably have to just go with removing the plaster ceiling when I am ready to do the bathroom and then sheetrock the whole ceiling and be done with it.  I really don't like blocking all that plumbing off but at least it would be sheetrock which is much easier to repair.

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5767
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana

Offline johnleve

  • Posts: 120
Re: Kitchen Ceiling
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2015, 12:28 PM »
Thanks Tom, I will have to check with the wife to see what she thinks.  I think I might also be able affix tin tiles to the squares to minimize the suspended ceiling look.

Offline JimD

  • Posts: 349
Re: Kitchen Ceiling
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2016, 07:49 PM »
My situation is not the same but there are similarities.  I have a bathroom above the kitchen.  There has been a leak and there is damage in two areas.  I know the shower control leaks but I don't know if that damaged the ceiling (water leaks into the show, I don't know if it goes into the wall) or if the shower pan is leaking.  If the latter, it means removing the mud bed that is probably on the walls too.  Nasty job.  If it is just the shower control, that is cut a hole in the wall and replace, then patch the wallboard.

What makes my situation messy is the popcorn ceiling.  That is not as bad to take down as plaster but still creates quite a mess.  But I do not think I can replace the damaged drywall and patch the popcorn.  We do not like popcorn ceilings so I plan to take it down.  I already did a bigger room, our great room, and if we keep this house I will get rid of all the popcorn eventually.

Long way of saying I would pull the plaster and put up drywall.  For an occasional plumbing issue (say once every 10-20 years, you cut a hole and patch the ceiling when you are done.  Even if it was every 5 years, it isn't a huge job to fix a 2x2 foot hole. 

Offline rizzoa13

  • Posts: 585
Re: Kitchen Ceiling
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2016, 07:58 PM »
If you plan to redo the bathroom above the kitchen don't you plan to remove and lay new flooring in thst space? If so couldn't you remove the sheathing at that time to access the pipes and make any changes you want?

If I were in your shoes Id mud the ceiling you have up and deal with the plumbing for the bathroom from inside the bathroom.

Offline johnleve

  • Posts: 120
Re: Kitchen Ceiling
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2016, 04:26 PM »
Thank you for the suggestions, I have decided that the ceiling will be coming down.  I don't have a great picture of the largest issue I face and a large reason for the ceiling coming out but will attempt to explain it. 

A plumber got their hands on a saw and did a hack job on the floor joists.  On one about 80% is missing for about 8 inches and on another there are notches on both sides.  There is a tub that covers both of them so there is no weight on either of those two joists.  The tub is coming out and a shower stall is going in so I need to sister both of those joists which I think will be easier with access on both sides.

I addition I have some electrical that needs work and also look forward to getting a little more ceiling height.

I agree that patching drywall is not a huge issue and we will go with a flat ceiling which will be easy to work with in the future if needed.