Author Topic: Larch wood  (Read 1436 times)

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Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 828
Larch wood
« on: January 07, 2019, 11:39 AM »
I might have an opportunity on large amount of Larch wood and wondering if anyone here have experience with that specie. I am planning to use that wood for furniture like bed and table.

-By the grain pattern it look to me to be close to Dougle Fir?
-Do that specie is more prone to movement?

All I found about it is it's used mainly for construction and cutting board.

Info link
Mario

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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5777
Re: Larch wood
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2019, 02:07 PM »
The only thing I know about larch is that it's used a lot for construction lumber because it's a rapid grower. It's also relatively hard for a softwood.

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 531
Re: Larch wood
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2019, 03:53 AM »
I only know it to be more resilient against weather influences than similar species like douglas or different firs.

A little tougher, but sometimes a lot of knots and „twisted growth“.

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 828
Re: Larch wood
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2019, 06:39 AM »
I only know it to be more resilient against weather influences than similar species like douglas or different firs.

A little tougher, but sometimes a lot of knots and „twisted growth“.

Thanks to both of you for your input.

Note well taken, I have to avoid knots  [big grin].

What funny about this is that 3 people during the holidays told me that they need a new bed base. A good friend of mine suggest me a source for Larch at a scary crazy price. The only down side is that I have to visit my sister to get the wood. A 6hrs drive  [eek], at 1.20$ BF I believe it is worth  [smile]
Mario

Offline Jem

  • Posts: 3
Re: Larch wood
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2019, 10:55 AM »
The only thing I can add is that when I cut larch on my sawmill, the dust is like micro needles. It's the only wood species of the many I've cut which is like this. I have to remember to wear gloves or my hands feels like I've just handled a nano sized porcupine.  I've only used it for framing and making trusses, because of its superior strength and better rot resistance to spf.

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 828
Re: Larch wood
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2019, 11:26 AM »
The only thing I can add is that when I cut larch on my sawmill, the dust is like micro needles. It's the only wood species of the many I've cut which is like this. I have to remember to wear gloves or my hands feels like I've just handled a nano sized porcupine.  I've only used it for framing and making trusses, because of its superior strength and better rot resistance to spf.

Gloves that is  [big grin] ty
Mario

Offline Rob-GB

  • Posts: 1085
Re: Larch wood
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2019, 06:18 AM »
Larch gets used for fence panels and posts or sheds in the UK, not much else. In Bad Salzuflen, Germany there are examples of Larch clinker built boats that are riveted with copper.
Most of my woodwork related books are in boxes still so I can't find the ones that would provide better insights to its uses.

Given its external use and longevity maybe garden furniture would be a route to take.

Rob.

Offline Farming_Sawyer

  • Posts: 125
  • Sawyer, builder, winemaker, farmer, chef
    • Foley's Custom Sawmill
Re: Larch wood
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2019, 08:37 AM »
The only thing I can add is that when I cut larch on my sawmill, the dust is like micro needles. It's the only wood species of the many I've cut which is like this. I have to remember to wear gloves or my hands feels like I've just handled a nano sized porcupine.  I've only used it for framing and making trusses, because of its superior strength and better rot resistance to spf.
In Maine, I find Larch to be a fickle wood to mill. Some cut like pine, others like devil wood... Twisty and difficult. Even a good sized tree will have poor grain. I try to avoid milling it.
CT 26E, RO125, sys-mft, sys-toolbox, a bunch of 30 year old tools I'm looking to replace.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3849
Re: Larch wood
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2019, 09:20 AM »
“I try to avoid milling it.”

Can it be split?