Author Topic: PVC moulding  (Read 2452 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Rusty Miller

  • Posts: 238
PVC moulding
« on: July 21, 2014, 08:38 AM »
Just wondering if any of you have worked with pvc moulding and flat stock.  My questions are does the flat stock cut fine with TS55 and how does it do for routing.  Also if you are sticking it to itself or wood what kind of glue do you use.

Any help,
Rusty
Rusty Miller
I'd rather be woodworking!

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline roblg3

  • Posts: 751
  • Transforming into a whole new machine
Re: PVC moulding
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2014, 12:19 AM »
PVC mills and cuts easily.  I would suggest if you have alot or will do more PVC work that you look into getting the plastics blade for the saw.  Slow down the speed so you don't wind up with a melted mess.  Its plastic so when it gets hot instead of cutting, it will melt and Leave your edges gummy.  About speed 3 with the plasti
Rob Gardner
Operator
RL3 Enterprises

Offline Rusty Miller

  • Posts: 238
Re: PVC moulding
« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2014, 07:57 AM »
Thanks Rob.  It's really a kinda one time thing right now.  I made an outdoor project for a friend a few years ago and some of the moulding has rotted away.  Just thought I would try something that might last a while longer.

Rusty
Rusty Miller
I'd rather be woodworking!

Offline roblg3

  • Posts: 751
  • Transforming into a whole new machine
Re: PVC moulding
« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2014, 08:19 PM »
You can cut it fine with any blade.  Just clean the blade afterward.  And if you have any antistatic spray for clothes, I recommend spraying the tools you'll be using.  That "dust" sticks like glue!  Even to your skin. But no worries it is only a nuisance nothing permanent.  Good luck and show pics!
Rob Gardner
Operator
RL3 Enterprises

Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7351
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: PVC moulding
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2014, 10:31 PM »
Just wondering if any of you have worked with pvc moulding and flat stock.  My questions are does the flat stock cut fine with TS55 and how does it do for routing.  Also if you are sticking it to itself or wood what kind of glue do you use.

Any help,
Rusty

I pretty much only use PVC outside.  As already mentioned pvc mills well, however, it should be noted that the trim/moldings/sheets are cellular (porous) pvc.  That means the cut/milled edges are not the smooth the the uncut material.  This really doesn't cause a problem if you are painting your work since the paint will fill the small pores on the milled sections.  If you aren't going to paint then the milled parts will look slightly different and will hold dirt and mildew far more than the uncut stuff.

As for glue, there is pvc cement made for pvc trim that dries a little slower.  If you need to glue the pvc to wood or other material use a construction adhesive, I use PL polyurethane glue.         
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline Curt Boyer

  • Posts: 192
Re: PVC moulding
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2014, 11:18 PM »
Here is some PVC moulding I made and installed today. PVC dents and scratches very easily, be careful handling it as it also has very sharp edges. You can remove small dents and scratches with a heat gun. Wave the heat gun over the imperfection and the PVC will swell filling up the dent. When you mill the edges if you sand with 150 then with 320 grit it will smooth it out almost like factory.
Have fun!
Curt

Offline Rusty Miller

  • Posts: 238
Re: PVC moulding
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2014, 07:16 AM »
Thanks guys for all the help, this should really make it easier.  I thought I had some pics of the original piece that I made but I can't find any.  I will take somemore as I go and post them when I'm finished.  Again, thanks, I knew I could count on the forum to help me out.

Rusty
Rusty Miller
I'd rather be woodworking!

Offline Rusty Miller

  • Posts: 238
Re: PVC moulding
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2014, 08:40 AM »
The project was a cover for a well pump in a ladies back yard.  It was an old fashion church building that would set overtop of the pump.  The picture is of the steeple part. The rest of the "church" has held up very well.  Hopefully a fix this time will last for the life of the cover and me.

Rusty
Rusty Miller
I'd rather be woodworking!

Offline Curt Boyer

  • Posts: 192
Re: PVC moulding
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2014, 08:27 PM »
Rusty
That looks like a fun project! When you glue PVC to PVC you apply glue to one side of the joint not both like wood. We just repaired something similar to your project and used Azek. Because PVC isn't structural we used cedar 2xs frame for rigidity and to mount it to the roof.
Cheers
Curt