Author Topic: Router bit storage  (Read 3881 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline CADru

  • Posts: 50
Router bit storage
« on: August 05, 2018, 06:17 PM »
In an attempt to eliminate rust from my router bit shanks this is what I came up with. I started with the festool foam insert for storing my router bits. Though rusty shank became an issue with this setup so I switched to bit holders from Lee Valley. Didn't care for the combo bit shank option from Rockler, though less expensive. Sent them back.
http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=50697&cat=1,46168,69435,46180

I use AutoCAD to create my insert/hole layout templates. Then print at 1:1 on 13' x 19" paper using my large format printer. I cut the insert base from 3/4" birch plywood using a 1/4" hardboard template. Cut with jigsaw and cleanup with template bit on router table. I drilled the bit holder mounting holes on a drill press. I tape my printed hole layout to the insert base and drill my holes directly through the paper template. Coated the plywood insert with 4 coats spray Spar poly.

Router Bit kit: Router bits (of course) 1/4", 1/2", 8 mm shank. Pitch/resin remover, rust/stain remover, brush, bearing lube, scotch bright, allen keys & bearings/screws (in an old pill bottle) and a small rag. My remover solutions are Boeshield stored in small spray bottles I found at a local Walmart. As a rust prevention I use Zerust Plastab cards with great success. Each 1x3 card has a protection radius of 7" for 2 years.
http://www.zerustproducts.com/products/electronics-tools-parts/plastabs/

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2503
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2018, 08:21 PM »
I use the FT foam insert for my router bits and have had no problems.  But my shop is heated and cooled.  I guess your's is more exposed to the elements if you were getting rust on the shafts.

Have you tried Boeshield T9 on your tools by chance?   I've been happy with it for rust prevention on items I store in my car and outside in the garage.

Offline CADru

  • Posts: 50
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2018, 08:45 PM »
I use the FT foam insert for my router bits and have had no problems.  But my shop is heated and cooled.  I guess your's is more exposed to the elements if you were getting rust on the shafts.

Have you tried Boeshield T9 on your tools by chance?   I've been happy with it for rust prevention on items I store in my car and outside in the garage.
@neilc These bits spend most of their time in my vehicle, so yes, I'd say more exposed to the elements  [big grin]. Due mostly to temperature changes moving from conditioned space to non-conditioned space probably yields my lite shaft rusting. I hoping the bit holders provide more air movement then the foam insert. Yes on the T9, the Boeshield products are best IMO.

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 975
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2018, 03:14 AM »
Nice setup. I'm thinking about doing similar but with a SORT/3 drawer (and use a combi systainer for the router to always have the bits accessible).

Regarding rust on the shafts: I suspect the holders (instead of foam) won't do much of a difference when the problem is condensation caused by temperature changes, water vapor is quite mobile.

I think putting protection on the bits themselves (shielding them from 'seeing' the water) likely is a more promising approach. Possibly having a small container holding a one-hole foam insert moistened with a non-drying* oil to quickly stick the bits in (so the shaft is lubed) prior to putting them into their storage location could do that trick.

*) With this I refer to a stable oil, not a drying/curing/oxidising kind that can self-ignite

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 785
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2018, 08:38 AM »
Does anyone have experience with the Lee Valley cannisters that contain a desiccant that absorbs water vapor?  They are reusable.  You heat them in an oven when they are saturated.  I have one in a plane drawer, but it's in Colorado where the average humidity runs pretty low, so it's hardly a fair test.

Nice organization!  What do you have in the containers?

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 15
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2018, 09:30 AM »
I don't have experience with LV onces, but I do use something similar (Caruba Silica Gel Cases, I had them originally for my camera and lenses). Since using these tins in the drawers where I store my chisels and bits the rust has been significantly reduced. Combined with a regular wiping with "Metall Siegel" resulted in no rust at all anymore. This is in a normally humid climate, but this summer here in North Western Europe is extremely dry, so this year is not a good reference. Mind though that you have to regularly recondition the silica. Most people wait too long to do that, which make that stuff a lot less efficient.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3630
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2018, 10:03 AM »
Very nicely done!    [smile]
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline CADru

  • Posts: 50
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2018, 06:52 PM »
Does anyone have experience with the Lee Valley cannisters that contain a desiccant that absorbs water vapor?  They are reusable.  You heat them in an oven when they are saturated.  I have one in a plane drawer, but it's in Colorado where the average humidity runs pretty low, so it's hardly a fair test.

Nice organization!  What do you have in the containers?
@HarveyWildes If you mean the blue plastic containers they are additional router bits. I recently decided to give the Katana series bits from MLCS a try and they ship their bits in these plastic containers. I was surprised, haven't seen these individual containers in years. I remember years ago purchasing some Amana tool router bits and the plastic containers were similar but yellow in color.
https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/kathome.htm

Offline CADru

  • Posts: 50
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2018, 07:10 PM »

I think putting protection on the bits themselves (shielding them from 'seeing' the water) likely is a more promising approach. Possibly having a small container holding a one-hole foam insert moistened with a non-drying* oil to quickly stick the bits in (so the shaft is lubed) prior to putting them into their storage location could do that trick.

*) With this I refer to a stable oil, not a drying/curing/oxidising kind that can self-ignite

@Gregor I have been using Camellia Oil on other tools. Didn't seem proper to use on a router bit shank where it might impede collect friction. Might not be an issue just seems odd to me [unsure]

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4933
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2018, 09:48 PM »
I rather like your approach.  I think I’ll steal your idea but I’ll counterbore the holes that hold the router bits to some depth into the ply and eliminate the router bit holders from Lee Valley. If you throw in a small amount of non-gelling oil into each counterbore, the ply will absorb it and when the router bits are inserted into each counter bored hole, the residual oil will slough off and deposit itself on the router bit shaft... to a greater or lesser degree.

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 535
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2018, 08:23 AM »
@CADru I'm planning to do the same but with their the brass version. Obviously more expensive but I like the fact that those are taper and easy to remove. Each bit from LV comes with that plastic holder and I find them a tight fit. Since you are traveling with the bits it make more sense to use those  [wink]. Be careful when you pull out the bits to not cut your self.

LV also offer Van Guard wipes. Simply make an incision into the bag and leave it in your bits container.

I use GlideCote to protect the bits.

Disclaimer: It looks like I am advertising Lee Valley products but I am NOT believe me. The store is 5 minutes from work and I can't resist visiting them at least once a week  [eek]
Mario

Offline threesixright

  • Posts: 35
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2018, 10:50 AM »
How about using some Ballistol to clean the bit, then store it?

I wipe all my metal tools with it after use. 


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 975
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2018, 12:15 PM »
How about using some Ballistol to clean the bit, then store it?

I wipe all my metal tools with it after use.
Using it too for that purpose, seems to work good so far.

Offline CADru

  • Posts: 50
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #13 on: August 07, 2018, 05:21 PM »
How about using some Ballistol to clean the bit, then store it?

I wipe all my metal tools with it after use. 

Thanks for the tip. Would have to confirm/test usage on the plastic bit holder material. Wouldn't want it to break down the small internal compression fins that hold the bit secure.

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 616
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #14 on: August 07, 2018, 08:23 PM »
Does anyone have experience with the Lee Valley cannisters that contain a desiccant that absorbs water vapor?  They are reusable.  You heat them in an oven when they are saturated.  I have one in a plane drawer, but it's in Colorado where the average humidity runs pretty low, so it's hardly a fair test.

Nice organization!  What do you have in the containers?

I use these in my tool cabinets:

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=68931&cat=1,43456
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=53828&cat=1,43456,53828

in conjunction with the Boeshield T9, CRC or Movitt. My shop is wet in winter.

If I am building a new cabinet, I will try this: http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=69378&cat=1,43456


Offline aloysius

  • Posts: 286
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2018, 11:56 PM »
A thin coating of Camellia Oil and liberal scatterings of recycled Silica Gel sacks in a sealed container are time-honoured methodologies for rust prevention on raw iron & low alloy steel surfaces.

I'm sure there's higher tech (& undoubtedly more extravagant) measures available, but the abovementioned strategies have been successfully implemented (by substituting the oils & waxes & dried absorbent cereal grains for Silica nodules) for the past 3 millennia since the dawn of the iron age.
FOG-wit since '95:  Some say since birth...

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 1087
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2018, 05:43 PM »
OP: Any chance you could post a PDF file of the printout so that others could print out the template?
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 535
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2018, 06:41 PM »
@ben_r_
Quote from: ben_r=topic=56785.msg555643#msg555643 date=1535060615
OP: Any chance you could post a PDF file of the printout so that others could print out the template?

If you already have a systainer with an insert put the insert face down on a piece of paper or ply and trace it
Mario

Offline Don T

  • Posts: 1812
  • Phoenix, Az
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2018, 07:39 PM »
Here is a copy that someone drew up a long time ago.  Hope this works for you.  I also have the mini systainer if anyone wants it.
RO150, C12, DF 500 Q, CT33, TS75, MFT3, Kapex 120, MFT3/Kapex, MFK 700, RO 90, ETS150/3, CT22, Centrotec Installers Kit, Parallel Guides & Ext, Carvex, OF1400, LR32 Set, MFS400 w/700 rails, KA UG Set, First Aid Kit, RTS 400 EQ, Vecturo OS400 Set, CT Wings, CT Drill Guide, Pro 5, CXS, C18, HL850, Vac Sys set

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 1087
Re: Router bit storage
« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2018, 08:57 PM »
Here is a copy that someone drew up a long time ago.  Hope this works for you.  I also have the mini systainer if anyone wants it.
Thank you! And yes please add the Mini Systainer too! I use those a lot also.
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!