Author Topic: Help me understand this whole systainer/sysport thing  (Read 4685 times)

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Offline WillAdams

  • Posts: 11
Re: Help me understand this whole systainer/sysport thing
« Reply #30 on: April 18, 2018, 11:47 AM »
The odd thing is, most of the tools which I would want in this portable tool storage / work area setup would be hand tools, so integration with the vacuum isn't desirable, and I hope to be using the vacuum sufficiently w/ a CNC that the UDD will pay off.

Okay, specifics then. Does this seem reasonable for getting up / down basement steps and doing some light hand tool work?

  • Festool 498660 SysRoll Systainer and Storage Dolly
  • Festool 500076 SYS-MFT Tabletop Systainer
  • Festool 200119 SYS 4 Sortainer

Would that get to a reasonable work height for hand tool work? (I'm thinking not) --- is the SysRoll suited for rolling back up against the railing of a deck, locking the wheels, clamping the Tabletop Systainer to the railing and then doing some (moderate) hand tool work on it?

What additional Systainer / Sortainer would be the best complement to the above to get it to a reasonable working height without making it too heavy to move up / down steps?

Would I find it annoying to remove the Tabletop Systainer to get at tools in an ordinary Systainer in-between it and the Sortainer?

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2362
Re: Help me understand this whole systainer/sysport thing
« Reply #31 on: April 18, 2018, 12:54 PM »

Start with the dimensions in height as approximations...


The Sys1 is 4"
The Sys2 is 6.2"
The Sys3 is 8.25"
The Sys4 is 12.4"

If you want a comfortable height for sawing or planing, I think you should get to around 30" at a minimum   If you want to work on your knees, it can be much shorter.  A MFT table is about 35". 

The SysRoll does not have locking casters and I don't think it would be that stable to try to saw, route or plane something on it.  I have looked at them many times but for my use around the house, I didn't find them that compelling when I look at stability, portability and still having to deal with removing the stack to get to the middle.  Others here that own them can speak to their utility with that.  If you are going to a job site, I think the utility is better.

If all you are doing is going up and down basement steps for a project, consider just two stacks of Systainers that you can lock together and carry in each hand to get you to a better and more stable 'working' height without the SysRoll.

Sortainers CAN be heavy if they get filled with tools/parts/bolts/etc.  I have 8 of the Sortainers and like them a lot, but they are stationary. 

I'd start with they typical types of power tools and hand tools you will use on projects away from the workshop - drill, maybe sander or jigsaw and their Systainer height if you happen to have them and fill in from there. 

Next figure out if you want the Systainer for the power tools to go up and down the stairs.  I personally leave them in the shop when doing home projects and just take the tools in a Sys Toolbox with other things.

Which leads to my favorite hand carry items for around the house or projects at family/friends homes are the Sys Storage and Sys Toolbox. 

My shop is in the basement but I have a Sys Storage on the first floor in a closet on a shelf for typical tools around the house - pliers, adjustable wrenches, screwdrivers  hammer, prybar, flashlight, nailset, assorted screws, wire nuts, tester, etc.   The Sys Storage is great for my hand-tools and assorted collection of fasteners.  And the cantilevered top gives you easy access. 

The Sys Toolbox is nice for grabbing other tools from my workshop - scrapers, caulk guns, a hand plane, torch or tubing tools for plumbing, a CXS drill, drill bits, as well as project hardware or supplies. 

There was a guy on FOG that made a wooden 'top' for the Sys Toolbox to essentially allow a worksurface above the handles.  I can't find the PDF but it was an interesting way to convert the box with the elevated handle into a bench of sorts.  But it was a cool idea and enabled a 'Sys-MFT' like top for work holding above the base.

Hope this is of help - Share your stack when you get it figured out!

Online Peter_C

  • Posts: 572
Re: Help me understand this whole systainer/sysport thing
« Reply #32 on: April 18, 2018, 01:25 PM »
Okay, specifics then. Does this seem reasonable for getting up / down basement steps and doing some light hand tool work?

  • Festool 498660 SysRoll Systainer and Storage Dolly
  • Festool 500076 SYS-MFT Tabletop Systainer
  • Festool 200119 SYS 4 Sortainer
~
Would I find it annoying to remove the Tabletop Systainer to get at tools in an ordinary Systainer in-between it and the Sortainer?
Why not just get an ultra portable work bench? If the MFT is too much an X-table might fit the situation. I use the heck out of mine. It even gets used for gearing up for scuba with double tanks.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-X-Horse-2-5-ft-Workbench-229694/301046021

There are a lot of options that cost less than a Sys Roll, plus some type of work top, and at the same time will be more functional.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-1-8-ft-x-3-ft-Portable-Jobsite-Workbench-225047/205887786
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Professional-Woodworker-Foldable-Workbench-51834/204739343
https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-33-in-Folding-Portable-Workbench-DWST11556/301867227
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Keter-21-65-in-x-33-46-in-x-29-7-in-Folding-Work-Table-197283/203118732
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Worx-Pegasus-Multi-Function-Work-Table-and-Sawhorse-with-Quick-Clamps-and-Holding-Pegs-WX051/302287890
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Kreg-2-6-ft-Portable-Workbench-KWS1000/302433629

Offline WillAdams

  • Posts: 11
Re: Help me understand this whole systainer/sysport thing
« Reply #33 on: April 18, 2018, 06:02 PM »
I already use a folding workbench like to: https://www.homedepot.com/p/Professional-Woodworker-Foldable-Workbench-51834/204739343

My idea behind this is that I'd have one thing to grab, it'd roll up the stairs easily, in a single trip, I'd get some working done, then put it away --- currently, the folding workbench is one trip, a toolbox is another, and any clamps or other odds-and-ends (or other toolboxes) are separate trips --- some projects it feels as if I spend more time hauling stuff up/down than actually working.

The overbox/worktop is interesting and I may look into that as a further improvement.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 13
Re: Help me understand this whole systainer/sysport thing
« Reply #34 on: May 20, 2018, 06:49 PM »
The systainers were a pleasant surprise when I discovered Festool.  My dream is for a global ISO standard for a system of small containers/totes.  So far the world hasn't standardized a container smaller than a 20 foot conex.

As it is, what Festool has is the closest thing to getting it right. I own a lot of power tools, but the problem is of course with other brands you either don't get any case (really bad), or as is often the case they make a different case for every tool, everyone a different size and shape.  I'm sure many folks have the random pile of Milwaukee tool blow molded cases piled in the corner always wanting to fall over.  And then the random pile of all the tools that never had a case, or the really sad cardboard box, maybe a bunch of the insanely pointless canvases bag (seriously, why not just cut to the chase and have them connect as a filter bag in a shop vac so they are useful).  I have most my life stored in rubber totes because of moving around. It's nice, just move stuff around with hand trucks, but they are not a good answer.  Lots of various tools, materials, etc get stored in Bins in a shelf system, not a great solution either.  Having everything in something like the festool systainers is the much better solution.  Biggest issue with converting tools over to them would be the cases they came with, can't throw them out as now that sucks if you go to sell them, yet they take up space and don't stack nice.

I would agree that they aren't going to be the fastest answer, but when you need to keep everything stored away, because either you go to a jobsite, or like me, you move around a lot, you have small shop space, you have a house under construction for years, etc.  Having a way to put everything away nicely that stacks nicely, or can have nice standardized cabinetry built for it is great.  Moving is so much easier when you keep all your belongings in totes/containers and just point to movers and they move it.  Also as people mentioned being able to put the tools away from dust and everything else is nice.  Means tearing tools down for maintenance cleaning less often.  Not having accessories scattered around with no home. Having a place for accessories in the case with the tool.  The key to managing small spaces is storage. A Systainer may seam big or wasteful, but it's actually a very efficient way to do it.  Shelves with scattered and tangled tools take up more room,  random sized cases package less efficiently than standard module based cases. People don't need bigger houses or garages, they need better planned storage.

Such cases also cause manufactures to think thru the design a little bit.  Try harder to fit into the same size case as the other stuff.   Some stuff will never happen,  I love that my Bosch table saw basically packs up into a cube. If they made a form fit case it dropped into, even better.   I would love to see a 12" compound miter saw that could do the same.

I have too many tools that lay around with no good way to store them.  I grew up with tools jammed under the workbench getting covered in everything in the garage, I don't want that again.

They could certainly make a better container, but even a less ideal container that is standardized is better than chaos.

Pretty sure if someone with a vacuum former started making plastic inserts for systainers for Milwaukee, Bosch, Dewalt tools they would have no problem selling them to folks.