Author Topic: Augmented rail splinterguard technique  (Read 2526 times)

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Online Naildrivingman

  • Posts: 83
Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« on: May 19, 2017, 06:11 AM »
This is probably not an original thought, but it has worked well for me.

When I install a new splinterguard, I clean the residual adhesive with denatured alcohol, mask off the back side of the rail (except for the groove where the new insert will live, then I spray an even coat of 3M Super 77 adhesive.  Once dry, I cut the insert to length of rail less 1/4" and install to the rail 1/8" short of each end.  I rebate the length because several times I've caught the edge of the splinterguard when moving the rails (especially the longer ones) and once a slight separation is introduced, foreign material gets in over time and eventually managed to work the initial slight separation larger and larger.  I use my rails on average two to three times per month (so not a lot), but all my splinterguards are well over two years old.  I attribute this longevity to the technique outlined above.

I hope this helps.
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Offline Edward A Reno III

  • Posts: 3034
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2017, 07:52 AM »
Thanks for the spray adhesive tip.
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Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 439
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2017, 09:39 AM »
This is probably not an original thought, but it has worked well for me.

When I install a new splinterguard, I clean the residual adhesive with denatured alcohol, mask off the back side of the rail (except for the groove where the new insert will live, then I spray an even coat of 3M Super 77 adhesive.  Once dry, I cut the insert to length of rail less 1/4" and install to the rail 1/8" short of each end.  I rebate the length because several times I've caught the edge of the splinterguard when moving the rails (especially the longer ones) and once a slight separation is introduced, foreign material gets in over time and eventually managed to work the initial slight separation larger and larger.  I use my rails on average two to three times per month (so not a lot), but all my splinterguards are well over two years old.  I attribute this longevity to the technique outlined above.

I hope this helps.

Interesting idea.  I have two new rails, so the splinter guards are already installed to the ends.  After reading this, I think I will try to cut the ends to 45 degrees - thoughts?

Offline Bohdan

  • Posts: 721
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2017, 09:46 AM »
The only time that it would matter is when you join two rails then there would be a piece of splinterguard missing and maybe some splinters.

Offline jtwood

  • Posts: 214
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2017, 11:44 PM »
Great idea, thanks.

I live in the desert, where the splinterguards on my 3 rails peel off by themselves at least once a year.  I'll try the 3M adhesive and tapering the ends.

Steve

Online Naildrivingman

  • Posts: 83
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2017, 05:41 PM »
The only time that it would matter is when you join two rails then there would be a piece of splinterguard missing and maybe some splinters.

I would guess that you are correct about the potential for splinters.  I do not join rails. I could never seem to get it exact (I did not buy the rail alignment jig from woodpecker et al).  I only own a 55" rail and a 109". When I transport the long one it is painful, but I like the idea that I have the long rail ready to go, rather than taking the time to join two.

The method that I have used seems to be far superior to simply relying on the factory installed tape.

Good luck all.
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Offline RobBob

  • Posts: 1060
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2017, 07:35 PM »
@Naildrivingman What do you mean by "rebate the length"? 

Online Naildrivingman

  • Posts: 83
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2017, 08:11 PM »
@Naildrivingman What do you mean by "rebate the length"?

I cut the splinterguard appx 1/4" shorter than the rail and split that difference on each end. The result is that I have 1/8" of no splinterguard at the start and end of my rails.
Dance with who brung ya...

Offline RobBob

  • Posts: 1060
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2017, 08:35 PM »
@Naildrivingman What do you mean by "rebate the length"?

I cut the splinterguard appx 1/4" shorter than the rail and split that difference on each end. The result is that I have 1/8" of no splinterguard at the start and end of my rails.

Gottcha.  Thanks.

Offline mo siopa

  • Posts: 79
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2017, 06:12 PM »
I see one potential problem with this- you won't be cutting at 90 degrees (or whatever bevel angle you set) to the surface.  The edge of the guide will be raised by the thickness of the glue while other edge is not.  In most cases, this would be negligible.  It could be a problem if you intend to join edges though.
Can somebody tell me what kind of a world we live in where a man, dressed up as a bat, gets all of my press?

Offline oneinch

  • Posts: 9
  • I'm a rookie. I measure once and buy twice.
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2017, 06:19 PM »
My rails are kept in unconditioned space: freezing cold to hot as heck. The splinter guard ends curl. I read a few tips recently on this forum to try. 1) Apply Fastcap speed tape; which I did. This is essentially the same tip as using a spray adhesive. I think either is a good idea. 2) Put a tiny spring clamp on each end when in storage. I'm doing this too. Time will tell if these efforts work.

I also cut the guard .125" short on each end as well as nipping the corners at 45°.

I read that the Festool adhesive is weak for a reason. It allows the guard to be repositioned outward and recut for a fresh edge.

Online Svar

  • Posts: 913
Re: Augmented rail splinterguard technique
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2017, 06:22 PM »
I see one potential problem with this- you won't be cutting at 90 degrees (or whatever bevel angle you set) to the surface.  The edge of the guide will be raised by the thickness of the glue while other edge is not.  In most cases, this would be negligible.  It could be a problem if you intend to join edges though.
You are overthinking it. It is negligible. Besides the non-slip strips on the other side are soft and compressible. They easily deform depending on the pressure you apply to the saw. And even that is not a problem.