Author Topic: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space  (Read 6868 times)

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Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #30 on: October 19, 2017, 11:21 PM »
3/4 inch Mahogany plywood is much easier to find.  Not every carries 1/2 inch.  If you want to use dowels or dominos to join the drawer than 3/4 is a better choice for added strength.

1/2 works well in miter joints, rabbits and dados.  I wouldn’t use 1/2 for domino and dowel based joints in a drawer. 

The downside is darker wood for your drawer.  The upside of Mahogany will be the ability to squeeze every useable cubic inch out of the available drawer space.  If you can find Brazilian Mahogany sheets you can get a much lighter finish that will compliment the Cherry wood very well. Brazilian Mahogany shares some similar red tones with Cherry wood. 

The other alternative is Beech.  Festool chose Beech for dominos for a good reason.  It’s very stable for indoor use.  It stains better and has a nicer grain patterns than Birch.  There’s also less defects in Beech plywood.  Beech also accept dyes much better than birch so there more options to change the color to your liking.

Beech plywood would be another good option.  People choose birch because it’s 20-35% cheaper than Beech plywood.

Here’s link on staining Beech. It makes beautiful drawers.

https://www.woodworkerssource.com/blog/woodworking-101/tips-tricks/finishing-tips-for-beech-woodworking-projects/

Thanks again Steven, all good information.

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Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #31 on: October 19, 2017, 11:23 PM »
You can use the 4mm Dominos. Just takes a little fore though and careful layout.

These pieces are 50mm tall, the top of the groove/dado is 15mm from the bottom.

I used the paddle Domino, referenced the bottom with the paddles instead of the top.

These are for the shop, going to spray them with KA+, which ever color I have enough of. Piece were made from drops of other jobs.


Tom

Thanks Tom; as I said above, all good information.

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #32 on: October 19, 2017, 11:29 PM »

I am watching this as I have similar plans.

Assuming that this thing is shaking like there is no tomorrow, then fatigue is your biggest concern.
That excludes Aluminium.
But it adds in Fibreglass, steel and wood.
The marine ply, screwed and glued may not be a bad option.

There are a lot of platforms with "slide out drawers" made with either that or MDF that seem to hold up... I have only glanced at them so not sure what they are  but they slide on plastic that looks a bit like an upside down ski base.

Another option that would not really helpful is saving time, but has some strength:
A laminated drawer like a canoe. and basically it is like fibreglass in that the fibres run in the direction needed for strength, but using thin wood strips that make a plywood composite. Then the wood can carries the stress gracefully around the corner. (Like your basic a cheap chair.)
That sort means that the cans lay on their sides as the corner has a fillet of material.

I think you need some requirements:
1) Water proof?
2) Corrosion?
3) cycles of fatigue?
4) etc... etc...

If you did the canoe style, then you would need the mandrel to lay them up on.
So whether it was fibreglass, hammered copper, or laminated wood, you need the same male mandrel.

I do not think you can do better than that... hence I would probably 'screw and glue' rectangles together...

Thanks again Holmz. These do not need to be waterproof, or highly corrosion resistant (although that's always nice). Fatigue is always an issue to consider on a "moving apartment".

You have some interesting options, but again, alas, way above my pay grade (and more importantly, skill!)

-Dick

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #33 on: October 20, 2017, 12:03 AM »
Hi all,

I want to thank all of you who have replied for your thoughtful ideas.

After much deliberation, I have decided to have my local HVAC shop fabricate the four pantry drawer boxes (12-1/4" wide, 16 to 21" deep) from 1/16" galvanized steel. The flat pattern for all four walls and the bottom will be in the shape of a fat cross, and they just love to use their plasma cutter for this sort of stuff. Normally I object to this, but in this case, once the four walls are folded up 90*, the corners will be welded, and will undo all the ragged edges (as long as the original rectangular pattern is sheared).

I will then pop rivet the slides to the sides, and screw the Cherry solid wood fronts on using the special screws with oversized heads that allow some adjustment (sorry, can't remember the name/brand of these right now). I'm ordering one of these recessed handles from Lee Valley: Cherry Pull #02G13.25, as well as one each in Red Oak and Maple, and I'll see which looks best against the Cherry planks I have. (sorry, trying to paste in the URL for these didn't work)

If the pantry boxes are stiff enough (and I think they will be), I'll have them do the four galley drawer boxes the same; these drawers are 18 to 19-3/4" wide, and 21-1/2 to 23-1/4" deep (I said I had to shuck-&-jive around plumbing and such!) If the pantry drawers are "iffy" stiffness-wise, then these wider ones will be made from 0.080" galvanized steel.

BTW, I've greatly increased the available volume over the last few weeks: my first drawer design was just under 8 cubic feet, and now I'm just under 11-1/2 cubic feet! I'll report back on my progress as things develop.

Regards, Dick

Offline mike_aa

  • Posts: 980
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #34 on: October 20, 2017, 12:32 AM »
@dicktill 

How about some pictures as you are putting them together and of the final product?

Thanks, Mike A.

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 580
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #35 on: October 20, 2017, 12:36 PM »
@dicktill 

How about some pictures as you are putting them together and of the final product?

Thanks, Mike A.

Ditto

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1913
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #36 on: October 20, 2017, 01:28 PM »
Interesting thread, I look forward to the updates.
+1

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #37 on: October 20, 2017, 08:00 PM »
@dicktill 

How about some pictures as you are putting them together and of the final product?

Thanks, Mike A.
Ditto
Interesting thread, I look forward to the updates.

Wow, thanks for all the interest guys, especially now that for the most part I've decided to not use my woodwooding skills (such as they are) and tools. Dang, not a single Domino in sight.

I will post some pics as I go along, and there are a couple of other projects (shoe & map shelves in the aisle, and a cabinet in the bath) in the camper that will be made of wood, and should have some Dominos. But perhaps those should be posted in the "members projects" section? Perhaps the continuation of this one too, with a link posted here?

Regards, Dick

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #38 on: October 20, 2017, 08:07 PM »
... and screw the Cherry solid wood fronts on using the special screws with oversized heads that allow some adjustment (sorry, can't remember the name/brand of these right now).

Can someone help me out here? I've seen (recently) these screws with oversized heads that you put into an oversized hole in the drawer box (faux) front to attach the real front. You then have a bit of wiggle room/adjustment available.

Thanks Dick

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #39 on: October 20, 2017, 08:10 PM »
Depends on thickness/flexibility of the metal bottom sheet, thickness of the vertical walls and the quality of the material. With good plywood (that dosn't mainly consist of air pockets inside) it wasn't a problem so far to use these in 4x50 for 12mm plywood (bigger should wall thickness permit it, if needed pre-drilled 1mm smaller than the screws shaft diameter to avoid splitting) and spaced every ~6-8cm (depending on feel, I usually tend toward overkill).

For 9mm ply I would try the 3mm ones (in biggest length), build one sample piece and abuse it massively to find out if it'll hold together. Nevertheless, I would suggest you make the walls a bit thicker and place the rails into a groove (so the walls grow to the outside but you won't really waste useable space on the inside) to have more meat to connect the bottom into.

The linked screws will waste ~2-3mm below the bottom for the screw heads but have the benefit that they would hold against the sheet. To use countersunk ones (when needing that space) in this configuration I would increse the amount of screws to lessen the load on the individual one (so they don't pull through the sheet, aluminium is soft).

As I tend toward overdoing it (but I'm not in a mass-production environment, so the extra cost for screws and labor are no real issue for me) you might get away with less screws or could need more - YMMV. It's always a good idea to do science and screw some into a test piece to pull them straight out again, to get an idea how good they'll hold in your material. As is to build a prototype to test into oblivion before doing the real thing, when it is hard enough work to destroy it... it'll most likely last under normal use conditions.

Again, need a bit of help here. I'm not going to use these pan head Spax screws for this project, but they would be very handy for other projects. But I haven't found a source here in The States for them.

Thanks, Dick

Offline pixelated

  • Posts: 74
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #40 on: October 20, 2017, 08:48 PM »
McFeely's has some Spax pan head Phillips screws, similar but not the same as the linked ones;
https://www.mcfeelys.com/screw-fastener-web-store/mcfeelys-select-a-screw.html?brand_name=176&screw_head_type=36

McMaster-Carr might be a possibility too, though they don't ID brands.
https://www.mcmaster.com/#tapping-screws/=19wfwz1

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5271
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #41 on: October 20, 2017, 10:01 PM »
@dicktill

The Fastcap Powerhead. Here's the link----you have to scroll down to get to the sizes. I use the 1.25".

http://www.fastcap.com/estore/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=57675&idcategory=11

Tom

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #42 on: October 20, 2017, 10:02 PM »
McFeely's has some Spax pan head Phillips screws, similar but not the same as the linked ones;
https://www.mcfeelys.com/screw-fastener-web-store/mcfeelys-select-a-screw.html?brand_name=176&screw_head_type=36

McMaster-Carr might be a possibility too, though they don't ID brands.
https://www.mcmaster.com/#tapping-screws/=19wfwz1

Thanks Pixelated! I can live with the Phillips rather than the Torx drive, what I wanted was the pan head and the narrow threads, so the ones from McFeeley's will be great. I do buy a lot of stuff from McMaster-Carr, but all their self-tappers that I have purchased are primarily for sheet metal, and have more "balanced" threads, more like machine screws in that the peaks are more equal in size to the valleys (machine screws being equal). I do use a bunch of their self-tappers on the wood in the camper, but I think the Spax type thin threads will hold better due to less destruction of the wood.

Regards, Dick

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #43 on: October 20, 2017, 10:05 PM »
The Fastcap Powerhead. Here's the link----you have to scroll down to get to the sizes. I use the 1.25".

http://www.fastcap.com/estore/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=57675&idcategory=11

Tom

Bingo! That's the ones I saw (probably in a recent FOG post - maybe you posted it?), and I thought that they were Fastcap, but couldn't find them on their website. Of course it would have helped if I had remembered Powerhead!!!!

Thanks, Dick

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5271
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #44 on: October 20, 2017, 10:13 PM »
The Fastcap Powerhead. Here's the link----you have to scroll down to get to the sizes. I use the 1.25".

http://www.fastcap.com/estore/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=57675&idcategory=11

Tom

Bingo! That's the ones I saw (probably in a recent FOG post - maybe you posted it?), and I thought that they were Fastcap, but couldn't find them on their website. Of course it would have helped if I had remembered Powerhead!!!!

Thanks, Dick

That was me.

Tom

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #45 on: October 20, 2017, 10:18 PM »
The Fastcap Powerhead. Here's the link----you have to scroll down to get to the sizes. I use the 1.25".

http://www.fastcap.com/estore/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=57675&idcategory=11

Tom

Bingo! That's the ones I saw (probably in a recent FOG post - maybe you posted it?), and I thought that they were Fastcap, but couldn't find them on their website. Of course it would have helped if I had remembered Powerhead!!!!

Thanks, Dick

That was me.

Tom

In that case, double thanks Tom, else otherwise I wouldn't known about them!! [big grin] [embarassed]


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3613
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #46 on: October 20, 2017, 10:35 PM »
FWIW...galvanized steel cut with a plasma cutter will rust/corrode because it leaves a naked edge. A bit of humidity, a splash of vinegar, tomato juice, lime/lemon juice, even apple 🍎 cider will start the process. Also, randomly misplaced salt with a little humidity could start the process.   Think 15/20 not 3/4 years.

If this was my project, I’d start with some aluminum sheet.

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 454
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #47 on: October 21, 2017, 10:54 AM »
Should have read this thread sooner. If it were me I would be working with plastics, like ABS. I have a dream of building my own RV in a Transit platform. You can add wood faces if desired, or Corian, but RV's are known for moisture issues. Any exposed metal rusts. Wood warps. Plastic doesn't change dimensions and are unaffected my moisture. Heat could be an issue depending on vehicle location.

Plus plastic cuts with regular wood working tools :)

Otherwise I would probably buy a pan brake and build everything out of aluminum. Although even aluminum will corrode. Hmmm...starts making stainless seem more desirable. Don't underestimate how much moisture there will be. If you haven't already do your research on things like insulation as it need to be fully breathable. Many are using closed cell spray foam, or Thinsulate.

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1913
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #48 on: October 21, 2017, 11:12 AM »
Wow, thanks for all the interest guys, especially now that for the most part I've decided to not use my woodwooding skills (such as they are) and tools. Dang, not a single Domino in sight.

I will post some pics as I go along, and there are a couple of other projects (shoe & map shelves in the aisle, and a cabinet in the bath) in the camper that will be made of wood, and should have some Dominos. But perhaps those should be posted in the "members projects" section? Perhaps the continuation of this one too, with a link posted here?

Regards, Dick

I like innovative solutions to problems regardless of materials and I'm very curious what unexpected things come up in your pursuit and how they get handled. I think Cheese is right to be thinking about rust so I'm wondering about painting/coating options. Only experience I have painting galvanized is conduit with house primer and paint, and it's held up well. Other guys here have likely done much more of it if you want to go that route.

As for follow up, if you start another thread please post a link here. That way I'll get an email about it.
+1

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #49 on: October 21, 2017, 12:13 PM »
FWIW...galvanized steel cut with a plasma cutter will rust/corrode because it leaves a naked edge. A bit of humidity, a splash of vinegar, tomato juice, lime/lemon juice, even apple cider will start the process. Also, randomly misplaced salt with a little humidity could start the process.   Think 15/20 not 3/4 years.

If this was my project, I’d start with some aluminum sheet.

Very good point @Cheese, thanks. Actually it wouldn't matter if it was all sheared, as the corners (where the plasma cuts would be) are going to be welded, and hence the galvanizing burned away. But the top edges of all the walls (which will be sheared) are bare too. I had thought about using aluminum (perhaps one or two notches up in thickness), but then there is the potential fatique problem. Perhaps with the galvanized steel boxes I could clean them real well, especially the welded corners, and spray paint them with Rustoleum clean metal primer, then a finish coat of Rustoleum (probably gloss white)?

Should have read this thread sooner. If it were me I would be working with plastics, like ABS. I have a dream of building my own RV in a Transit platform. You can add wood faces if desired, or Corian, but RV's are known for moisture issues. Any exposed metal rusts. Wood warps. Plastic doesn't change dimensions and are unaffected my moisture. Heat could be an issue depending on vehicle location.

Plus plastic cuts with regular wood working tools :)

Otherwise I would probably buy a pan brake and build everything out of aluminum. Although even aluminum will corrode. Hmmm...starts making stainless seem more desirable. Don't underestimate how much moisture there will be. If you haven't already do your research on things like insulation as it need to be fully breathable. Many are using closed cell spray foam, or Thinsulate.

Thanks Peter C.

Not to go too far off-topic, I should give you a bit of background. The camper is a 2010 Chevy extended van based Roadtrek 190P. A lot of stuff was poorly done by the factory, especially the insulation. So we've stripped it to the bare walls, added an inch of Thinsulate, and covered that with "Low-E", which is like Reflectix, but with a foam rather than bubble core, and is supposed to be more fire resistant. This layer is sealed as best we could by taping the joints and penetrations with thin aluminum duct tape so that it forms an effective vapor barrier - this will keep the relative humidity fairly constant inside in all seasons. I'm also almost totally revising the electrical and plumbing systems; as part of the latter, adding a backup gravity drain system for if the macerator fails. This involved making a custom drain fitting, and so I bought an expensive digital Steinel heat gun and had to learn to weld ABS. It is quite different from metal welding in that you do not get a nice molten puddle that you can move around, but rather a gooey mess that is hard to manipulate - it required quite a bit of going back, grinding out, and refilling to make it water tight. Not one of my better skills (not that metal welding is either), and although it is an intriguing idea, I just wouldn't want to consider making eight drawer boxes this way if this is what you had in mind. Oh, and ABS can be real gummy to cut.

But your last point is interesting: perhaps $tainless $teel is the answer.

Good luck with your homemade camper build. There are a lot of threads/blogs/forums on such things, a whole spectrum from very good to horrible. If you want some links and/or my opinionated advice, please contact me off line.

I like innovative solutions to problems regardless of materials and I'm very curious what unexpected things come up in your pursuit and how they get handled. I think Cheese is right to be thinking about rust so I'm wondering about painting/coating options. Only experience I have painting galvanized is conduit with house primer and paint, and it's held up well. Other guys here have likely done much more of it if you want to go that route.

As for follow up, if you start another thread please post a link here. That way I'll get an email about it.

Hi Paul G, thanks for your interest. I have painted galvanized steel before, and it turns out that the galvanizing is actually a better base than bare steel; perhaps the surface is a tad porous. I will try to follow through with pictures and links.

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 550
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #50 on: October 21, 2017, 01:24 PM »
So we've stripped it to the bare walls, added an inch of Thinsulate, and covered that with "Low-E", which is like Reflectix, but with a foam rather than bubble core, and is supposed to be more fire resistant. This layer is sealed as best we could by taping the joints and penetrations with thin aluminum duct tape so that it forms an effective vapor barrier - this will keep the relative humidity fairly constant inside in all seasons.
Keep in mind that a vapor barrier will not only keep moisture out but also work in the other direction - and humans emit water vapor on a constant basis...

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #51 on: October 21, 2017, 02:11 PM »
Keep in mind that a vapor barrier will not only keep moisture out but also work in the other direction - and humans emit water vapor on a constant basis...

Hi again Gregor. Absolutely right, and the main function of this vapor barrier is to keep the moisture in; if it gets too high, we can quickly air it out with the windows, doors, and large roof fan. If you do not have an effective vapor barrier then the moisture passes through the insulation (possibly soaking it, although Thinsulate is fairly immune to this compared to fiberglass) and condensing on the inside of the van walls (which can obviously have horrible effects) - and it negates the insulation's effectiveness, as it bypasses around or through it - see attached photo. Keeping the humidity low inside the van in cold weather is not an option as my wife has severe dry eye syndrome.

270449-0

... but we digress from the topic ...  : )

Regards, Dick

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #52 on: October 21, 2017, 02:55 PM »
Reality Check! - I calculated what the eight drawer boxes would weigh in 0.062" steel, and it came out to a whopping 106 pounds.   [eek]  So I went down to the shop and flexed the bottom of one of my cheap Sears tool box cabinet drawers (17 x 22, very similar to my largest galley drawer of 19-3/4 x 23-1/4) and I could press down pretty hard without a lot of deflection in the drawer bottom. That Sears drawer is a mere 0.031", so I think I'm overdesigning here. Obviously using this thinner material will cut the weight to a more reasonable 53 pounds. Not so sure that they'd be able to weld the corners though without burning them away, so maybe we'd need tabs bent on then the corners pop-riveted together. (Of course, there is also the huge er, tiny, increase of volume with this yet thinner material, tee hee.)

BTW when I did press down hard on the Sears drawer bottom, I sure got a lot of deflection in the cheap drawer slides. I have just received some of the KV 8400 RV Full Extension with Stay Close slides, and this will not be a problem with them. In addition, I am very impressed with the latch mechanism on these. Hmm, perhaps they had RV's in mind when they designed these.  [big grin]

« Last Edit: October 21, 2017, 02:57 PM by dicktill »

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1913
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #53 on: October 21, 2017, 04:13 PM »
Liking the idea about switching to stainless steel to avoid the rust issues. Plus it's more food safe and easier to clean.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2017, 04:24 PM by Paul G »
+1

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #54 on: October 21, 2017, 04:27 PM »
Liking the idea about switching to stainless steel to avoid the rust issues. Plus it's more food safe and easier to clean.

Correct, my acknowledgement that SS was probably the answer was buried in reply #49: "perhaps $tainless $teel is the answer".

Thanks, Dick

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 550
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #55 on: October 21, 2017, 04:38 PM »
Liking the idea about switching to stainless steel to avoid the rust issues. Plus it's more food safe and easier to clean.
Let's do a reality check:
- do you put your food into these drawers without any form of wrapping or box?
- do you see yourself use the vehicle in a prepper manner (loaded up to the top)?
- how many km (miles, whatever units) do you do per year on offroad tracks (or mismaintained roads) so will vibrations really an issue with a design built lighter than a tank?
- what is the projected lifetime of the build (how long will the vehicle last)?

Bottom line: will an overengineerd (heavy and expensive) design really have tangible advantages, compared to a simpler build?

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 454
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #56 on: October 21, 2017, 05:03 PM »
The more I think about it ABS is the right material. It glues super easy. You put everything together, than with a needle type tool inject glue into the joints. Cut a square strip of say 3/16"x3/16" and glue them inside every 90* corner. Depending on size of said drawers 3/16" might just be the thickness needed for the actual drawer box. No dados, no complicated designs, just build a box, yet strong as heck, and CHEAP! Plus light weight :)

Anyone got a reason ABS wouldn't work? I can't think of one.

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #57 on: October 21, 2017, 05:25 PM »
Thanks again Gregor - my answers in red below - not sure what you're suggesting with this, please explain.
Let's do a reality check:
- do you put your food into these drawers without any form of wrapping or box?  No
- do you see yourself use the vehicle in a prepper manner (loaded up to the top)? I'm assuming you mean proper manner - yes, absolutely loaded
- how many km (miles, whatever units) do you do per year on offroad tracks  very little (or mismaintained roads  hey, most roads in The States are mismaintained! [big grin]) so will vibrations really an issue with a design built lighter than a tank? agree
- what is the projected lifetime of the build (how long will the vehicle last)? probably 10-15 years - the big question is whether we will last that long [big grin]

Bottom line: will an overengineerd (heavy and expensive) design really have tangible advantages, compared to a simpler build? absolutely not, and I'm trying not to overengineer it, hence the recent mention of .031" stock (galvanized or SS, aluminum would still have to be .062")

Offline dicktill

  • Posts: 276
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #58 on: October 21, 2017, 05:32 PM »
The more I think about it ABS is the right material. It glues super easy. You put everything together, than with a needle type tool inject glue into the joints. Cut a square strip of say 3/16"x3/16" and glue them inside every 90* corner. Depending on size of said drawers 3/16" might just be the thickness needed for the actual drawer box. No dados, no complicated designs, just build a box, yet strong as heck, and CHEAP! Plus light weight :)

Anyone got a reason ABS wouldn't work? I can't think of one.

Sorry Peter, I hadn't thought of simply gluing the ABS - doh. I checked on McMaster-Carr, and they only have 1/8" or 1/4", not 3/16", but there may be other sources. I am concerned about having to have a reinforcement inside of the corners, as that messes up the storage volume. The only gluing of ABS that I've done is plumbing, and those joints are in shear, so not sure how well it works in tension. Not saying it isn't strong, I just don't know.

Thanks, Dick

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3992
Re: building drawer boxes to maximize (internal) space
« Reply #59 on: October 21, 2017, 06:23 PM »
What is the fatigue strength of welded ABS?
(Making a single test drawer and loading it with cans - driving down a dirt road for 20miles - would be a start.)

I would think that fatigue would be the major consideration?