Author Topic: Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...  (Read 1212 times)

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Offline Gunso

  • Posts: 18
Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« on: January 24, 2019, 02:13 PM »
Can you recommend a technique to create a nice even dip in a chair base?

I replaced some old tired birch bases with an oak kitchen worktop but being flat the chairs are not as comfortable as before!


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Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 503
Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2019, 04:30 PM »
Sanding? [emoji41]

Or sitting (very extended periods) with high amounts of food consumption. [emoji6]

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3731
Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2019, 04:40 PM »
Replace a toddler’s diaper with sandpaper.

There are a lot of ways in this Search.


Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1400
Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2019, 04:55 PM »
I would trace out the area you want to carve out, then drill holes in the appropriate areas from 1/8" up to 3/8" or 1/2" (whatever your maximum depth will be).  These holes would be your depth gauges so you know you've carved out enough material.  Space them out about every 1" or so.  Maybe tighter in the back if the transition is more abrupt and you can space them out a little more where the transitions are a little more gradual. 

There are probably a number of ways to hog out the waste, from rotex sanders/RAS to hand tools.  The arbortech turbo plane on an angle grinder is pretty fast and efficient (need to clamp a template around the outside edges of the area you will be hogging out), however, it's about $150 so it's hard to justify for one time use.  It is a bit less messy since you're creating chips instead of fine dust, but you'll still want to do this outside if you can.  When you're close, refine it with a scraper and sander with an interface pad (or two).

I'm curious what methods others might recommend.  I've looked into this but haven't built something sculpted or carved before.   
-Raj

Offline Mario Turcot

  • Posts: 758
Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2019, 09:34 AM »
Power carving
thewoodwhisperer
@3:40
Mario

Offline harry_

  • Posts: 1225
Re: Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2019, 06:01 PM »
Skillsaw.

Not for the faint of heart.
Disclaimer: This post is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead is purely coincidental. Void where prohibited. Some assembly required. Batteries not included. Contents may settle during shipment. Use only as directed. No other warranty expressed or implied. This is not an offer to sell securities. May be too intense for some viewers. No user-serviceable parts inside. Subject to change without notice. One size fits all (very poorly).

Offline aloysius

  • Posts: 327
Re: Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2019, 06:42 PM »
An Arbortech Turboplane fitted to a nice small compact variable speed grinder the likes of Metabo's WEV10-125 Quick.  The bigger 1400-1700w tools from Metabo, Makita & others have much more output power, but also are physically larger & heavier, making them a bit of a handful.

My ultimate carving grinder is the long-discontinued WE9-125.  The speeds (3-10K) & lower power (900w) make for easier, safer control.  Combined with the old tool's small, bulbous bodygrip makes for one of the safest, easily handled & ergonomically superior carving grinder I've ever encountered.  Almost all others commonly have a less comfortable & securely gripped cylindrical body, are larger & heavier than the lovely little Metabo.

They still come up regularly in used guise from the usual sources.  What makes the WE9-125 so good as a carver, makes it less than suitable as a metal & stone processing tool, however.  Here, power, speed and a secure 2-hand grip become much more important than the little Metabo provides.

The smaller carving combo is more about delicacy & finesse than the brute force & power that larger tools provide.

Arbortech's turboblade is a lovely, (relatively) safe, smooth & secure means of freehand carving & hollowing.  Ideally suited to chair & stool seat hollowing I'd suggest, being specifically designed with this particular task in mind.  Once you get the balance between tool, grinder speed, angle of attack & pressure correct, progress becomes almost intuitively fast, smooth & controllable.  It's the weapon of choice for rapid but controllable gross material removal from just about all the commercial carvers I've known.

A final smooth with a small-format ROS like Metabo's 70mm SxE400 or the equivalent Mirka Ceros fitted with intermediate contour pads with will allow a final finish in no time.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2019, 01:54 AM by aloysius »
FOG-wit since '95:  Some say since birth...

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 282
Re: Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2019, 10:24 PM »
I don't think Festool is the solutions in this instance.  Look into travishers and scorps.


Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2537
Re: Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2019, 01:24 AM »
The RAS 115 works great for this application. I have made 5 Maloof-inspired chairs with seat bowls using the RAS. Great sander for this application and paired with Saphir 24 grit, you can carve quickly.

Offline AndrewG

  • Posts: 64
Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2019, 06:46 AM »
I’m making a sculpted chair and initially used a holey galahad wheel on my angle grinder and found that it worked great but the dust was too much. I ended up buying the RAS 115 and although it’s not perfect dust extraction, it’s still pretty good.

One thing I was impressed with was how much control I had when sculpting to a line. You of course have the option of fitting finer grits etc for a better finish. I don’t use it often, but when I do it’s an absolute pleasure to use.

Offline JD2720

  • Posts: 1060
Re: Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2019, 07:54 AM »
I don't think Festool is the solutions in this instance.  Look into travishers and scorps.

That is not true. I made several chairs & shaped the seats using a HL 850 planer with an undulating planer head. I Then finished with a RO 150 sander. I have never gotten any complaints from clients.

Offline demographic

  • Posts: 403
Re: Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2019, 03:43 PM »
Skillsaw.

Not for the faint of heart.

You beat me to it.
Kind of like the way Izzy Swan made a bowl using a circ saw on Youtube.

Offline dupe

  • Posts: 72
Re: Can you recommend a method for chair seat shaping ...
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2019, 02:15 PM »
some day I'll work out one of these setups

MFT.1080    CT.Midi    DF.500    DTS.400    ETS.EC150/3    RO.150