Author Topic: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project  (Read 70905 times)

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Offline awdriven

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Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« on: May 11, 2011, 05:16 PM »
I'm putting together a simple raised bed garden on Friday and got the idea to build one of these guys as a surprise - http://brucepostco.com/tower.html



It's probably beyond a 1 day build for me with all of those shelves (looking at the large 11-shelf), but I keep thinking it's really just repeating a lot of the same cuts over and over, and who knows, maybe I will surprise myself or someone here could recommend some time saving ideas.

Any ideas for working efficiently on this? I'm planning on making a sketchup model so I can have my angles established ahead of time. I won't be getting the stock until Friday morning.

Once I get my miter saw dialed in, the shelves would just be a matter of measuring and sliding in the shelves. If I use dadoes, small errors in shelf length would be hidden.

Have to look at my MFT - maybe I could use the fence, guide rail and limit stop to repeatably plow dadoes with an OF1400? (Just mark centerline of each one and slide the workpiece to center each dado)

Much as I'd love it, Domino'ing this together would probably be overkill. (at least for the shelves.) It probably makes sense to domino the uprights and possibly the base together, though.

What would be the best time-efficient way to secure the shelves in place?

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Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2011, 06:56 PM »
If my dadoes were stopped on both ends, it would hold the shelves in place.

Thinking about it more, perhaps I could make a template out of half inch plywood for the legs. That would make pretty quick work of routing the dadoes and also remove the need for measuring and marking as long as I was dead-on with cutting the legs and placing the template each time.

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2011, 01:17 AM »
It's definitely easier looking at it on my computer screen compared to what you showed me on your cell phone.  Now I have lots of ideas for you.  I'll go over all of it when I see you later today.  I'm also bringing a more powerful saw that'll put the TS75 to shame for what we tried earlier.

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2011, 07:27 AM »
Now I have lots of ideas for you.  I'll go over all of it when I see you later today.  I'm also bringing a more powerful saw that'll put the TS75 to shame for what we tried earlier.

Ken:
You have certainly aroused my curiosity, (not that that's difficult) I would love to see any or all of the above.
Tim

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2011, 09:37 AM »
It was good putting a face to a name yesterday, Ken - Thanks for stopping by!

My guess is a 2-man hand saw ;) Just give me a ring around the same time as yesterday.

Honestly though, I have been trying to remind myself of the power and flexibility of hand tools.

There are more hints in the other pictures about how this was put together. I think some of the decisions were made with easy assembly via screws in mind, though.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2011, 09:27 PM »
I did a quick sketchup so I could figure out the angles. I drew it with 2x6 uprights, but looking at the pictures and then my drawing, I think the real thing was built with 2x4.



Sketchup Model DownloadSketchup Model


Offline BTDT

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2011, 09:37 PM »
This looks like a cool project. Keep us posted! I might need the push. Of course I think this would be prime opportunity to use some of my Sipo Dominos.

Good luck tomorrow!

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2011, 11:23 PM »
I spoke with Bruce Post this morning to gain a little insight into his design of the tower and confirm some things I noticed in the pictures.  To me it appeared that the dados for the slats were tapered and beveled.  Bruce referred to it as a keystone design to lock the slats in place, yet allow removal for whatever the need.  They also handle the weight of the dirt and plant material.  I'm thinking he uses a jig mounted router that keeps the router at a bevel that's a complimentary angle to the upright framework, hogging out the main amount of the dado with a straight bit, then cutting the sides of the dado with a dovetail bit, two times for each slat.  In doing the geometric calculations and using Bruce's measurements from his website, I came up with a slightly different, but close angle of inclination to what awdriven is showing in Sketch up.  I'm also guessing they are 2x6's because of the depth of the slats.  5 1/2" looks like it would fit better than the 3 1/2" of a 2x4.  Then again, sometimes it does look like 2x4 construction.  I might make a visit to Bruce's place next month while I'm in Maryland and if I do, maybe I can get some good pictures and accurate detail to confirm or correct some of these ideas.

He uses Phillips head screws to connect the basic framework.  I was thinking more along the lines of using exterior pocket hole screws with pocket hole joinery and matching pocket hole plugs for a better look.  Bruce recommends placing a full size traffic cone or upside down clay pot within to displace the need for a lot of dirt to fill the interior volume.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2011, 11:27 PM by Ken Nagrod »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2011, 09:12 AM »
Thanks for the recommendations! I think I will make a template out of some quarter inch MDF sheet and some wedges made of three quarter inch ply. This would allow .me to make the dadoes at a tapered depth by tilting the template and router relative to the stock.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2011, 09:15 AM »
And I don't thinly the tapered dadoes would need to change the bevel of the compound cut on the shelves, just the miter angle.

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2011, 09:21 AM »
From looking at the parts picture, it appears to be a consistent bevel on the slats or shelves.

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2011, 10:05 AM »
I'm thinking he uses a jig mounted router that keeps the router at a bevel that's a complimentary angle to the upright framework, hogging out the main amount of the dado with a straight bit, then cutting the sides of the dado with a dovetail bit, two times for each slat.

Ken:
Why would you have to dovetail the slat inserts? If you cut the miter a bit over, couldn't a friction fit in the sloping dado cut be enough to hold it in place?

I'm also guessing they are 2x6's because of the depth of the slats.  5 1/2" looks like it would fit better than the 3 1/2" of a 2x4.  Then again, sometimes it does look like 2x4 construction. 

Ya, in the 11 slat version it looks like 2x4 but in the photo of the parts (on the site) it looks like 2x6 or even slightly 3 1/2" x 6 stock.

He uses Phillips head screws to connect the basic framework.  I was thinking more along the lines of using exterior pocket hole screws with pocket hole joinery and matching pocket hole plugs for a better look.

Ya, pocket screws and plugs would definitely look nice. I notice staining from the screw holes on the frame, but it is a planter after all so maybe not that big a deal.
Tim

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2011, 10:10 AM »
Ken:
Why would you have to dovetail the slat inserts? If you cut the miter a bit over, couldn't a friction fit in the sloping dado cut be enough to hold it in place?



That's one of the things that isn't clear to me just yet after viewing the pictures and talking with Bruce over the phone.  I really need to see it in person and since I'll be down that way, I might just make the trip across the Chesepeake Bay to find out.

Offline Tom Bellemare

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2011, 10:44 AM »
I made a planter out of a bunch of old, used cedar fence pickets a few years ago using sipo dominoes and no glue. I call it a puzzle planter. At first, I tried to seal it up and keep it looking like new cedar. That lasted about one season and then the top started to loose its finish. I was going to clean it up with a sander and maintain it but it was so full of basil I decided to let it go natural. When the basil died off, I had already gotten into the mindset that natural was good so here it is now:

38080-0


I really like this strawberry tower and showed it to Veronica. She wants one. I still have several of those used pickets and I'm going to figure out how to build one with just sipo dominoes and no glue. At least, I think I am.


Tom


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Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #14 on: May 15, 2011, 09:52 AM »
I'm glad some other folks are taking an interest in this too!

Unfortunately with some delays I had during the day Friday, I didn't get any farther than buying the stock. (I did finish a white oak raised bed garden though.)

The smell of cedar is taunting me now.

I spent more time in Sketchup last night and my model is very close now. I think I figured the angles out.

Still to do in the model is to incorporate the tapered dadoes in the legs and model all the shelves.

Any ideas on how to build a jig to route the dadoes? Something to keep in mind is that there are 88 dadoes to cut, so I think the most efficient jig would be something that makes it easy to consistently place the dadoes. The idea in my head is a flat template that a bearing guided router template bit could follow - except the whole template would be wedge shaped. An alternative would be a jig that tilts the stock instead of the router.

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #15 on: May 15, 2011, 03:37 PM »


I spent more time in Sketchup last night and my model is very close now. I think I figured the angles out.

I was curious about the size of the uprights so I did some work in sketchup. Based on using the picture of the 6 ft. version (Photomatch) it looks like everything is 2x4's (1 1/2x 3 1/2") and 1"x4" slats.

I got 16 degree angle but that was somewhat of a compromise based on the photo match.
38131-0
The sketchup file is  rough and not complete, but if you would like me to send it to you I will.
Any ideas on how to build a jig to route the dadoes?  An alternative would be a jig that tilts the stock instead of the router.

My personal choice is to build a jig that tilts the stock.
Tim
« Last Edit: May 15, 2011, 03:40 PM by Tim Raleigh »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #16 on: May 15, 2011, 09:44 PM »
Sure, I'd love to see your model - my e-mail is knelson at (my alias) .net

So far, I have some up with these angles -

Shelves:
23.9 degree bevel  (note - I updated this after my original post.)
39.3 degree miter
Shelf 35 degrees from horizontal

Uprights 14.5 degrees from vertical.

The four uprights have about 4 inches of vertical mating in my model. My previous drawing had more - but this isn't very useful space-wise. (Can't grow strawberries there.) In my model, my tower is just shy of 6' 1" (when you include the flat shelf on top)

Next step is for me to experiment with those dadoes and their impact on the compound cuts of the shelves.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2011, 06:53 PM by awdriven »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #17 on: May 16, 2011, 03:43 PM »
I'm planning on making the dadoes taper from half inch depth to zero out half an inch from the outside edge of the 2x4.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2011, 12:08 AM »
Still working with the model. Thanks, Tim, for the Sketchup tips!

I wonder in the shelves are set at 38 degrees, which is a common crown molding spring angle. The way the shelves are dadoed into the upright, you have to cut a different miter than your saw's crown detents or marks on the scales would tell you, though.

I had been thinking about skipping the half laps in the base, but they're good for resisting the spreading forces.

I think I will skip the cutout in the cap piece and use some Sipo dominoes and glue to join the tops of the uprights.

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #19 on: May 18, 2011, 12:12 AM »
I think the purpose of the cap piece is to keep water (rain) off the upper joint to extend its life and add a little extra strength from separation.

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #20 on: May 18, 2011, 12:18 AM »
Still working with the model. Thanks, Tim, for the Sketchup tips!

I wonder in the shelves are set at 38 degrees, which is a common crown molding spring angle. The way the shelves are dadoed into the upright, you have to cut a different miter than your saw's crown detents or marks on the scales would tell you, though.

I had been thinking about skipping the half laps in the base, but they're good for resisting the spreading forces.

I think I will skip the cutout in the cap piece and use some Sipo dominoes and glue to join the tops of the uprights.

If that's the case, the shelf would be 4 7/16" or 4.44" in width OR that would be the length of the dado.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2011, 12:20 AM by Ken Nagrod »

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #21 on: May 18, 2011, 09:40 AM »
Still working with the model. Thanks, Tim, for the Sketchup tips!

I wonder in the shelves are set at 38 degrees, which is a common crown molding spring angle. The way the shelves are dadoed into the upright, you have to cut a different miter than your saw's crown detents or marks on the scales would tell you, though.
When I did my drawing I just tried to follow the photo as closely as possible so I never knew the angle. Because the upright is both tilted and turned the compound angle of the shelf is probably never going to relate to any crown detents.

I had been thinking about skipping the half laps in the base, but they're good for resisting the spreading forces.
When I built my model I thought the half laps were a good idea. I would keep them.

I think I will skip the cutout in the cap piece and use some Sipo dominoes and glue to join the tops of the uprights.

The cutout does seem to be a royal PIA, but I think it would do a better job of holding the uprights together. For the top cap I would probably use a 2x and cut a small peak 5 degrees or so into it so the water ran off, rather than sitting on top and eventually warping it rendering it totally useless.


If that's the case, the shelf would be 4 7/16" or 4.44" in width OR that would be the length of the dado.

The length of the dado (in my drawing) would be less than 3.5" as it tapers to a depth of 0" before the outside edge of the upright. You could probably use 1x3 (3/4"x 2 1/2) for the shelves as there is an 1" overhang on the back of the shelves. Other than an easy way to locate each shelves for assembly, I am not really sure what structural value those dadoes have.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2011, 09:53 AM »
I wanted to say this would be a pain, but if you think about it - it's just two perpendicular rectangles that need to be routed out. Is the 'festool' way to do this with the MFS?

Mark the center of the workpiece, set up the MFS templates to appropriate size and route?

Ok, maybe you guilted me into it ;)


I adjusted the shelves last night by widening them 1 inch at the short ends if the miters. This made them 'cut' into the uprights by a little more than a quarter inch. (Quarter inch tapered dado) I experimented with half an inch, but that looked excessive. What say the think tank, is that enough support?

This probably really belongs in the 'member projects' area now.

Offline William Herrold

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2011, 11:15 AM »
This is a great project! I'm trying to look at it from the perspective of latitude, specifically- the choice between constructing a triangle or a quadrangle. Those of us in "the North" will understand. Next, I'm going to call my Aunt, down South in N.Cal for advice...The sweetest strawberries I've had..Thankyou, Joanne....
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Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2011, 11:20 AM »
I think when Ken spoke to the person who sells these, he said that this design makes it easy to remove a shelf if that's needed for any reason. I don't think there is any strength added by them, just ease of assembly and maintenance.

I'd think it would be easiest and cleanest to fill the planter by installing the shelves progressively as you fill it up. It would also be helpful if you ever had to empty the planter to move it. I could see a shelf getting damaged by someone elses's kids climbing on it. (Mine would never do that.  ::) )

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #25 on: May 18, 2011, 05:16 PM »
Tim, a tapered cap, like a fence post topper could look nice and also be really functional. Another time where it would be nice to have a band saw  [unsure]

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2011, 02:32 AM »
Some updated exports from the Sketchup Model -

On shows the whole project (with possible post cap) and the other shows the dadoed shelf setup. I still need to figure out a jig to efficiently and consistently route 88 tapered dadoes. Maybe just a tray that holds the stock at the proper angle and supports an plywood template above, that I can use a bearing-guided bit inside.




Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #27 on: May 19, 2011, 09:12 AM »
I'm trying to look at it from the perspective of latitude, specifically- the choice between constructing a triangle or a quadrangle. Those of us in "the North" will understand.

Hu...triangle or quadrangle? I don't understand? Maybe 'cause I'm in the southern of Canada. [big grin]
Tim

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2011, 09:35 AM »
Tim, a tapered cap, like a fence post topper could look nice and also be really functional. Another time where it would be nice to have a band saw  [unsure]

You could probably use a table saw for this as long as the cut was 3" or less.

Some updated exports from the Sketchup Model -

Looks good!
Hopefully you didn't have to extend each shelf individually to get the right length...?

On shows the whole project (with possible post cap) and the other shows the dadoed shelf setup. I still need to figure out a jig to efficiently and consistently route 88 tapered dadoes. Maybe just a tray that holds the stock at the proper angle and supports an plywood template above, that I can use a bearing-guided bit inside.

I am not sure about a bearing guided bit, my preference would be a template guide and straight bit as there is more flexibility in cut depth.
I think the MFS would be perfect for making the template.
I am thinking you will also need a left and right hand jig for those dadoes, I don't think you can just turn the uprights and have the sloped dadoes oriented the right way.
If I get some time I will see if I can draw up a jig.
I think you can be fairly sure if you build one of these your relatives will want one as well.
Tim
« Last Edit: May 19, 2011, 12:33 PM by Tim Raleigh »

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2011, 12:33 PM »
Tim,

I agree, this is probably a good use for the MFS, although I don't have one to lend K. and I don't believe he has one either, so this is another one of those great reasons to convince his wife he needs another tool - Festool for HER project.  [smile]

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2011, 12:43 PM »
I agree, this is probably a good use for the MFS, although I don't have one to lend K. and I don't believe he has one either, so this is another one of those great reasons to convince his wife he needs another tool - Festool for HER project.  [smile]

Ken:
I think he's half way there if it's for her, maybe she can buy it for him for fathers day.

It will be interesting to see if he can get some more requests for these...it wouldn't take that much more time to make 2-3 than one.
Tim

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #31 on: May 19, 2011, 12:46 PM »
I agree, this is probably a good use for the MFS, although I don't have one to lend K. and I don't believe he has one either, so this is another one of those great reasons to convince his wife he needs another tool - Festool for HER project.  [smile]

Ken:
I think he's half way there if it's for her, maybe she can buy it for him for fathers day.

It will be interesting to see if he can get some more requests for these...it wouldn't take that much more time to make 2-3 than one.
Tim

As long as it doesn't confilict with any design infringements that Bruce Post may have on this.

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2011, 12:57 PM »
I agree, this is probably a good use for the MFS, although I don't have one to lend K. and I don't believe he has one either, so this is another one of those great reasons to convince his wife he needs another tool - Festool for HER project.  [smile]

Ken:
I think he's half way there if it's for her, maybe she can buy it for him for fathers day.

It will be interesting to see if he can get some more requests for these...it wouldn't take that much more time to make 2-3 than one.
Tim

As long as it doesn't confilict with any design infringements that Bruce Post may have on this.

Ah, ya I think it might be an issue if he was starting a business but giving them away?
Tim

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #33 on: May 19, 2011, 01:16 PM »
Either way, I wouldn't want to harm the guy's business. He did some very nice work designing it and gives some good pre-sales information on his website that I wouldn't want to make him regret publishing. I think his price is fair given the complexity.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #34 on: May 19, 2011, 01:23 PM »
If Tool Nut is on the ball, the MFS will be employed on the project  [smile]

I've been thinking about the leg jig for a while. I'll need to try it in sketchup, but it IS possible I may need to make two templates - have to see.

I've seen some scarfing jigs made for boat building that give me some ideas for that ramp shape to taper the dado. The ideal jig would be one that is either usable for both sides or easily changed to work for both sides. Building two complicated jigs would be no fun and increase the chances of them not matching exactly.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2011, 01:30 PM by awdriven »

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #35 on: May 19, 2011, 06:47 PM »
If Tool Nut is on the ball, the MFS will be employed on the project  [smile]

I've been thinking about the leg jig for a while. I'll need to try it in sketchup, but it IS possible I may need to make two templates - have to see.

I've seen some scarfing jigs made for boat building that give me some ideas for that ramp shape to taper the dado. The ideal jig would be one that is either usable for both sides or easily changed to work for both sides. Building two complicated jigs would be no fun and increase the chances of them not matching exactly.

Also, check out Gary Katz's jig for a tapered and fluted newel post for some inspiration.
I guess we're way beyond that one day build on this project. [big grin]
Tim

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #36 on: May 19, 2011, 06:51 PM »
Tim,

Maybe this could be a collaborative effort.  You make some parts, someone else makes a bunch of another part and so on.  Then you all just ship to each other.  [wink]

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #37 on: May 19, 2011, 07:48 PM »
Tim,

Maybe this could be a collaborative effort.  You make some parts, someone else makes a bunch of another part and so on.  Then you all just ship to each other.  [wink]

It's a good idea.
Actually, if I was Bruce I would call Ken Kelly and get him to make these for me!
Tim
« Last Edit: May 20, 2011, 12:52 PM by Tim Raleigh »

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #38 on: May 19, 2011, 07:49 PM »
Tim,

Maybe this could be a collaborative effort.  You make some parts, someone else makes a bunch of another part and so on.  Then you all just ship to each other.  [wink]

It's a good idea.
Actually, if I was Bruce I would call Ken and get him to make these for me!
Tim

 [thumbs up] [doh]

Online Peter Halle

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #39 on: May 19, 2011, 07:52 PM »
IKEA operates that way  [popcorn] [doh]
Scraps to Smiles.  To be continued.....  Stay Tuned.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #40 on: May 19, 2011, 11:13 PM »
I call not-it on making all those shelves :)

Thanks for the link, Tim. I have a couple of Gary's DVDs and have been a visitor to the jlc finish carpentry forum for a while.

Deciding if the jig should locate all the dadoes (comb shaped template) or if the workpiece should slide through the jig) is something I am debating now.

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #41 on: May 20, 2011, 10:08 AM »
I call not-it on making all those shelves :)

Thanks for the link, Tim. I have a couple of Gary's DVDs and have been a visitor to the jlc finish carpentry forum for a while.

Deciding if the jig should locate all the dadoes (comb shaped template) or if the workpiece should slide through the jig) is something I am debating now.

This project looks simple but it's not that easy.
Those dadoes are wicked little pieces of work, not only are they sloped but the sides are also angled. Unless you know someone with a  CNC, there is some hand work (176 cuts to be exact) or match up pair of dovetail for one side and chamfering bit for the other. 
Building a jig for a table saw and cutting the dadoes with a dado set, set to the correct angle is probably the fastest way to do this but I don't think it would be the safest.
Wicked....
Tim

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #42 on: May 20, 2011, 05:16 PM »
I will post some jig sketches soon. I'm hopeful there will be little hand tuning.

Sketchup has been very helpful. I made and learned from a lot of mistakes. I "made" uprights in the jig and learned I could put the stock in the wrong way, figured out how to design the jig to change over between left and right, etc.

Offline Wood_Junkie

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #43 on: May 20, 2011, 06:06 PM »
I have followed this thread with an interest in the complex design (e.g. the geometry is crazzzy).


I don't want to derail the cool design discussion, but for lookie-loos interested in building one in a weekend... it just occurred to me that by sacrificing a little bit of the aesthetics (and save a ton of time) you could build the same functional piece, using square lumber (e.g. 4x4) for the corners of the pyramid.

This would remove the complicated elements of the compound-angled dadoes.  Just make the spacing marks on the pole.
Then you could use the Domino, MFT, some Qwas dogs, and using the guide rail as the Domino baseplate reference, with some stops on the guide rail... This would create an easily referenceable setup.  Mortise, mortise, slide.  Mortise, mortise, slide.

Or, you could still use sliding dovetails, but they wouldn't be compound angles.  The only angle would be to achieve the "tilt" of the slat.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #44 on: May 21, 2011, 02:55 AM »
Been working on possible jigs for a while this evening and running out of ideas. I'll e-mail the model to anyone who wants to bake their noodle a while thinking about how to do this efficiently ;p

The only feasible dado solution I see at the moment is something I think Tim had suggested. Come up with a jig setup that can hog out most of the material. (I am reasonably close to drawing something that could do this.) Then come back with maybe a Japanese pull saw and cut the angled shoulders. You could make some little guides that would help to angle the blade correctly. Still, that's 88 dadoes to tune up that way.

I'm seriously thinking about just using some Sipo dominoes for the job. (Since it's FOG, does that mean you won't say using Dominos is cheating?) I haven't thought much about the dominoes yet, but wonder whether assembly would be difficult. I guess I would glue up just one set of shelves at a time, possibly doing two opposing sides as separate assemblies first - then bringing together the two assemblies to complete the glue-up of the last two courses of shelves. I'd want to be careful not to distort the assembly - I was thinking ratchet straps may be a good way to pull the uprights tight against the shelf edges.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #45 on: May 21, 2011, 03:09 AM »
A couple renderings of the cutouts needed in the uprights -




Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #46 on: May 21, 2011, 04:30 PM »
Are there ~27 degree dovetail and chamfer bits out there that may work for the shoulders?

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #47 on: May 21, 2011, 08:55 PM »
This seems to be getting way too complicated.  After reviewing the parts photo again, I believe this has nothing to do with any special router bits or even a router.

It appears that Bruce set up a stacked dado on his table saw or on a radial arm saw.  Set it for the maximum depth of the groove shown, which is on the inside of all of the uprights.  He set the dado to a bevel.  Placed each upright flat on his table saw at an angle to the dado using his miter gauge or a sliding fixture and a stop prevented the upright from going all the way through the dado blade.  That's how he gets the beveled, tapered, stopped groove.  It's the changing depth of the groove on two adjacent uprights that causes the shelf/slat to wedge in tight when inserted.  Just make the slat's sides a slightly different miter angle than what the uprights are mitered at.  Decrease it by a degree or so and that'll wedge it tight in the grooves.  The bevel angle on the slats and uprights match.  You could leave the miters the same as well, but I think the slats would come out a little too easy.  That's why I'm thinking that the miter angles should be mismatched by just a degree or so.

What do you think?
« Last Edit: May 22, 2011, 01:26 AM by Ken Nagrod »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #48 on: May 21, 2011, 11:54 PM »
Very well could be, Ken - I took your theme and considered for a while.

I thought this joint would be such a pain to make by pretty much any means - the reality has to be reasonably easy to produce. It wouldn't be economical to sell this if it took as much detailed manual labor as we think the 'perfect way' would.

I adjusted my imaginary jig to 7/8ths dado width, which would hog out the area (and then some) taken up by the sloped walls. This would allow the shelf to fit but leave some small gaps. How unsightly would they really be? The shelves are going to be filled with dirt and plants.

It seems to work! The front-visible gap is at the bottom. The gap on top may not be very visible from the front because the void/gap is hidden inside the dado.

I'm starting the build on Monday. I'll start out prototyping this and change over to Dominoes if needed. (Though I need to make sure I have an assembly plan in that case.)

Some more images -








Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #49 on: May 22, 2011, 12:59 AM »
I don't understand why you would have a visible gap if you follow the method I outlined?  The dados hide the slight miter discrepancy between the slat and the uprights if you decide to do mismatched miter angles.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2011, 01:28 AM by Ken Nagrod »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #50 on: May 22, 2011, 10:22 AM »
Hey Ken, I was thinking similar on tuning the fit with the miter angle.

If you look in the first picture in my last post, the box shape is the cutting path of my imaginary router bit. It follows a ramp that tapers the depth of cut. It's also tilted a bit,which I did to make it more closely match the "perfect" joint. (like the bevel in  your dado stack)

I don't have a table saw that could be used with a dado cutter, but could work up a router jig that would get it done. (Probably slower though)

IIRC, the walls of the dado are about 27 degrees from the bottom.

The width and shape of the kerf taken by the dado cutter on a table saw gives another clue. You could bevel it and get the walls close, but the floor wouldn't be right. The depth of cut would be too deep on one side. That floor issue wouldn't be very visible, though.

You could also cut the shoulders with the TS55 set on a bevel, and finish removing the waste with a router. The jig that holds the workpiece would be the same.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #51 on: May 23, 2011, 10:17 PM »
I cut the uprights today after making a pair of prototypes out of Fir. The test fit was promising and the spread between the legs at the ground is within a few mm of the Sketchup model. I'll do the cross braces before I start the process of dadoing the uprights.

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #52 on: May 23, 2011, 10:45 PM »
I cut the uprights today after making a pair of prototypes out of Fir. The test fit was promising and the spread between the legs at the ground is within a few mm of the Sketchup model. I'll do the cross braces before I start the process of dadoing the uprights.

Nice! Hope it goes well.
Post some pictures when you can.
Thanks
Tim

Offline Festoller

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #53 on: May 24, 2011, 11:54 AM »
Well this doesn't require as much skills as the tower, but it serves the same purpose [cool]:





Take a look:

http://gizfactory.com/article/vertical-planters-from-h2o-designs/
« Last Edit: May 25, 2011, 03:46 AM by Festoller »
The fact that we live at the bottom of a deep gravity well, on the surface of a gas covered planet going around a nuclear fireball 90 million miles away and think this to be normal is obviously some indication of how skewed our perspective tends to be. -Douglas Adams-

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #54 on: May 24, 2011, 09:33 PM »
Today I had a little road trip I had to make in the morning, but I got in a good 6 or 7 hours on the project today. I made all the half-lap joints today using the MFS. The learning curve was MUCH easier because of all the info posted by members here. I test fit the uprights with the cross braecs and the fit was NICE. I'm glad I took my time cutting the uprights because they're basically the backbone of the piece. I went to cut the cross braces and realized that I shouldn't have cut off 8 inches from that last cedar 2x4. I was short - darn.

I panicked, then remembered I had a cedar 2x4 left over from a project a few years ago. Whew, it was just long enough and even matched dimensions of the rest of the stock. my current stock.  I made more half-laps with the MFS and used a jigsaw to cut out the central interlocking half-lap joint. It was then that I threw away my good fortune of having the extra 2x4 because I cut out the wrong edge of one of the 2x4s. It caused the half-laps to be on the wrong side to mate with the uprights.

At this point it was getting late to run to the lumber yard, so I cut out the middle of the 2x4, cut a new piece to replace it, and tied the piece back together with 4 8x22x40 sipo dominoes. It's drying in the garage now. I'm not sure - maybe I'll just get another piece of cedar and re-cut it. What would FOG do? These cross-braces are covered with dirt once finished, so esthetics are less of a consideration than strength. I could also possibly drill a few pilot holes and drive a screw through each pair of domino joints?

Any advice on assembly methods? Domino and glue the uprights to the cross braces?

At the peak, where the four uprights meet - I have a ~2x2 block of cedar. I'm trying to figure out the best way to marry up the peaks of the uprights and this 'core'. Ken, if you're in the neighborhood again soon, this piece is something I may need a hand with - Was having a hard time getting a good piece nice and square on 4 sides for this. (After MFSing a lot today, maybe I can rig something up.)

Next step is to temporarily assemble the uprights to the base pieces and make a test shelf.

Next step is to temporarily assemble

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #55 on: May 24, 2011, 10:45 PM »
At this point it was getting late to run to the lumber yard, so I cut out the middle of the 2x4, cut a new piece to replace it, and tied the piece back together with 4 8x22x40 sipo dominoes. It's drying in the garage now. I'm not sure - maybe I'll just get another piece of cedar and re-cut it. What would FOG do? These cross-braces are covered with dirt once finished, so esthetics are less of a consideration than strength.
Leave it it should be fine. Like you say, you're covering it with dirt and this is a prototype.

I could also possibly drill a few pilot holes and drive a screw through each pair of domino joints?
I wouldn't do this. I would wait until I screwed up another piece of wood somewhere else (cause chances are I would) and then replace it.

Any advice on assembly methods? Domino and glue the uprights to the cross braces?

Depends on what you want it to look like. For me I would just glue and screw it together as the original was.

At the peak, where the four uprights meet - I have a ~2x2 block of cedar. I'm trying to figure out the best way to marry up the peaks of the uprights and this 'core'. Ken, if you're in the neighborhood again soon, this piece is something I may need a hand with - Was having a hard time getting a good piece nice and square on 4 sides for this. (After MFSing a lot today, maybe I can rig something up.)

Not sure I understand - what is the function of this 2x2 block of cedar?

Tim



Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #56 on: May 24, 2011, 10:56 PM »
Tim,

The block of cedar is the top cap to the uprights.


Today I had a little road trip I had to make in the morning, but I got in a good 6 or 7 hours on the project today. I made all the half-lap joints today using the MFS. The learning curve was MUCH easier because of all the info posted by members here. I test fit the uprights with the cross braecs and the fit was NICE. I'm glad I took my time cutting the uprights because they're basically the backbone of the piece. I went to cut the cross braces and realized that I shouldn't have cut off 8 inches from that last cedar 2x4. I was short - darn.

I panicked, then remembered I had a cedar 2x4 left over from a project a few years ago. Whew, it was just long enough and even matched dimensions of the rest of the stock. my current stock.  I made more half-laps with the MFS and used a jigsaw to cut out the central interlocking half-lap joint. It was then that I threw away my good fortune of having the extra 2x4 because I cut out the wrong edge of one of the 2x4s. It caused the half-laps to be on the wrong side to mate with the uprights.

At this point it was getting late to run to the lumber yard, so I cut out the middle of the 2x4, cut a new piece to replace it, and tied the piece back together with 4 8x22x40 sipo dominoes. It's drying in the garage now. I'm not sure - maybe I'll just get another piece of cedar and re-cut it. What would FOG do? These cross-braces are covered with dirt once finished, so esthetics are less of a consideration than strength. I could also possibly drill a few pilot holes and drive a screw through each pair of domino joints?

Any advice on assembly methods? Domino and glue the uprights to the cross braces?

At the peak, where the four uprights meet - I have a ~2x2 block of cedar. I'm trying to figure out the best way to marry up the peaks of the uprights and this 'core'. Ken, if you're in the neighborhood again soon, this piece is something I may need a hand with - Was having a hard time getting a good piece nice and square on 4 sides for this. (After MFSing a lot today, maybe I can rig something up.)

Next step is to temporarily assemble the uprights to the base pieces and make a test shelf.

Next step is to temporarily assemble

I'm in the area all week.   Talk with ya tomorrow.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #57 on: May 24, 2011, 11:15 PM »
Thanks Tim - I've been happy that I had few mistakes so far. Cedar IS very apt to tear out when routing if you're not careful.

The only 2x4 work left are the mitered base pieces. I'm going to wait on cutting those until final assembly.

The 2x2 is just the point where the uprights meet. I didn't want to have a pointy top. I needed a way to keep the inside of the top part of the pyramid open.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #58 on: May 24, 2011, 11:30 PM »
Awesome, also sending you an e-mail about that other project, Ken.

Here's an x-ray view of the top of the tower. Hmm, I need to figure out how to make the cap too.


Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #59 on: May 24, 2011, 11:49 PM »
A couple bad quality build pictures from my phone :




Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #60 on: May 25, 2011, 12:19 AM »
A riff on the design,  which puts the shelves on the outside.

http://m.flickr.com/#/photos/larseraq/4611630409/

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Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #61 on: May 25, 2011, 12:27 AM »
Your photos don't show up without signing in it says.  Don't have an account, can't see 'em.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #62 on: May 25, 2011, 08:31 AM »
The Flickr ones, Ken? They're not my pictures, so its possible you need to be logged into Flickr to see them. I should also not re-host them for that reason, though.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #63 on: May 25, 2011, 08:38 AM »
For the Non-Flickrs, its a 3 sided pyramid with uprights like our project. The twist is that the shelves are on the OUTSIDE of the pyramid and fit into notches in the uprights. The shelves make beveled-side boxes. It's our project turned inside-out. :)

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #64 on: May 25, 2011, 09:19 AM »
Your photos don't show up without signing in it says.  Don't have an account, can't see 'em.

Here's a link (public) Plant Pyramid from Denmark.
This link starts at the beginning of the plant pyramid photo series. The plants look like they are doing well.

I don't like the design much, mostly because of the sharp corners.

Walking into that would really hurt your shin and some poor child could poke their eye out running into it.

Tim

Offline harry_

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #65 on: May 25, 2011, 10:01 AM »
Your photos don't show up without signing in it says.  Don't have an account, can't see 'em.

I was able to view them,... I was not required to log in
Disclaimer: This post is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead is purely coincidental. Void where prohibited. Some assembly required. Batteries not included. Contents may settle during shipment. Use only as directed. No other warranty expressed or implied. This is not an offer to sell securities. May be too intense for some viewers. No user-serviceable parts inside. Subject to change without notice. One size fits all (very poorly).

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #66 on: May 25, 2011, 10:34 AM »
Just make it a pentagon or octagon! (That's a lot of miters.)  ;D I still really like the one I'm building, but this was an interesting.

Offline kfitzsimons

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #67 on: May 25, 2011, 11:22 AM »
This has been a fun, entertaining and educational thread. And I'm not even thinking about making one! It's the FOG's version of the Car Talk Guys Puzzler.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #68 on: May 26, 2011, 08:28 AM »
You've got my number; I like a good puzzle. Glad this is entertaining some folks!

Should be more build updates soon.

Anyone find titebond 2 or 3 better for this application? I already have Titebond 2 and it is billed as good for outdoor use.

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #69 on: May 26, 2011, 12:40 PM »
You've got my number; I like a good puzzle. Glad this is entertaining some folks!

Should be more build updates soon.

Anyone find titebond 2 or 3 better for this application? I already have Titebond 2 and it is billed as good for outdoor use.

I think the consensus is that Titebond 2 has longer setup time and is easier to work with and probably better for this situation.
Here's a link to some comments by Gary Katz Greene & Greene Garage door(comment 23) about gluing up a large gate.
I like Titebond 3 for wood like Teak.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2011, 12:44 PM by Tim Raleigh »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #70 on: May 30, 2011, 04:12 AM »
Ok, more work on the project tomorrow. I think I have a jig design that will work. I cut some test mortises and the gaps were about as I'd expected, and acceptable for a planter like this.

The thing I am trying to figure out now is how to efficiently cut the shelves. They're a compound cut and my saw only has 38.5 detents with some adjustment on each side. Hopefully I can purposely adjust it out of range to my custom bevel setting.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #71 on: May 30, 2011, 11:26 PM »
I got the jig built and cut all the dadoes today.

I could have compensated better for variations in stock thickness, but I need to move this along!

The dadoes went smoothly once the jigs were built. I'll post some pictures later. (However, there is some variation in the cut depth due to some of the stock being a little thicker.

I also assembled the main frame. I glued and through-dominoed the half laps that join the uprights to the cross-braces. I glued and screwed the upper ends of the uprights together. Eventually the topper will also help hold everything together up top.

It came together pretty nicely and didn't need much persuasion to have everything mate up properly.

I had a scare while quickly fitting a test shelf, so I put my laser level on it and 90 percent of the dadoes are within a sixteenth of their mates (vertically), so hopefully not too much hand tuning when it comes time to put in shelves.

So, I have to cut the mitered base pieces, make the topper and cut 44 shelves.

Offline William Herrold

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #72 on: May 31, 2011, 01:45 PM »
I'd be tempted to put (well greased) casters on it, especially any design with more than three sides.
"I don't believe anything, but I have a lot of suspicions"
 R.A.W.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #73 on: May 31, 2011, 01:56 PM »
It's got some heft, even empty without its shelves. Ultimately it will live outside in the yard somewhere. Since it has 4 sides, I'll need to be careful about placement so every shelf gets enough sun. It'll be impossible to reposition once filled up. I'd need 9 inch pneumatic casters and a tractor to pull it  [tongue]

Offline Mike Goetzke

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #74 on: May 31, 2011, 05:09 PM »
A few years back I built one of these.:  http://www.woodstore.net/flowertuteur.html

Not as challenging but simple and functional.


Mike

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #75 on: June 01, 2011, 12:31 AM »
Some new pictures of the project as it stands today. Sorry, took them in a spare room downstairs so it's a mess and rather distracting. Also pretty dark, so little depth of field in these pictures.

I'll need to do some tuning of the miter on the shelf, fit isn't right yet. I think I'll also need to do a little cleaning up of the dadoes with a rasp or sanding block, just to relieve the top edge of the dado a bit more for a better fit. Shelf in the first photo obviously isn't  in the right location  [tongue]






Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #76 on: June 01, 2011, 12:47 AM »
Those dados don't appear deep enough for solid support of the slats with the weight of the plants and dirt, not to mention pulling the slats in and out over the life of the assembly will wear the edge and depth of the dados - I think. [unsure]  Was there a reason for not wanting or being able to go deeper with them?

Will you be keeping the math on them?  Might raise the value of the piece like it does with cartoonists drawings. (from what I've seen on TV)

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #77 on: June 01, 2011, 12:47 AM »
Sketchup drawings of the jigs. I was able to re-use the trough by simply spinning it 180 degrees when I was changing between doing left and right sides of an upright.  I made two parallelogram sleds/MFS-carriers. Their shape is the same, but flipped. I glued guide blocks onto the parallelogram base to register the sled to the proper angle relative to the trough and clamped the MFS carefully to the sled. I also had some wedges under the MFS to tilt it to a slight bevel angle. In retrospect, I would have experimented with this a bit more, but I've got growing plants at this point and I need to keep making good progress ;)

The term sled is misleading because I wedged it into place on the trough and slid the stock through the trough.

I plunged the bit through the MDF sled base to make the cutout. This had the nice effect of making it pretty easy to line up the marks I had made on the stock with where the cut would go.




Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #78 on: June 01, 2011, 12:56 AM »
I'm thinking about the dado depth too, this is approximately quarter inch. I'm not sure the shelves will really be carrying that much weight though, just a modest amount for the dirt actually inside each shelf. (At the lower shelves, that may be appreciable, though.) Staying true to the sketchup reverse engineering, Bruce's were probably close to half inch.

Getting the right angle takes some work, so you don't start cutting into the upright too close to the outside edge. I had one upright that I think was a bit thicker than the others, where the dado was overall a bit deeper and started closer to the outside face.

I think stainless pocket screws will be my backup plan for reinforcement if this doesn't pan out or can't readily be modified to work as we'd like.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2011, 01:01 AM by awdriven »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #79 on: June 01, 2011, 01:06 AM »
Might as well start collecting suggestions on how to deepen the dadoes if it turns out it is needed. I'm not great with neander techniques - would a hand plane work well in the cross-grain scenario like this? It's cedar, relatively soft and pretty dry.

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #80 on: June 01, 2011, 01:11 AM »
What's involved in taking it apart?  How did you attach the uprights to each other?

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #81 on: June 01, 2011, 01:24 AM »
Nah, it's not coming apart - pretty much all joints have glue -and- a mechanical fastener of some kind. (Screws or dominoes)

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #82 on: June 01, 2011, 01:30 AM »
Can you lay the whole assembly down on its side and mount the jig to each upright as before?  Then would there be enough room for the MFS setup?

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #83 on: June 01, 2011, 01:40 AM »
It's feasible for many of the dadoes. It starts getting tighter on space on the top 3 tiers of shelves. A smaller router would also probably help. The jig would need some new way of tapering the depth. Some wedges would probably be affixed to the lower surface of the MFS. Quarter inch thick tapering to zero over the ~3.5 inch distance.

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #84 on: June 01, 2011, 01:50 AM »
I'm guessing you'll figure out this new method.  I don't think the MFK700 would work considering what your doing, but you have the option of that router or my Bosch Colt if you want.  Just let me know.

Otherwise, special handplanes cause I don't think you want to chisel all that.  [blink]

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #85 on: June 01, 2011, 07:33 AM »
Otherwise, special handplanes cause I don't think you want to chisel all that.  [blink]

A nice shoulder plane like the medium Veritas should clean those up nicely. You won't get much extra depth without a lot of elbow grease so I wouldn't suggest it for that.

Tim

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #86 on: June 01, 2011, 07:38 AM »
Might as well start collecting suggestions on how to deepen the dadoes if it turns out it is needed. I'm not great with neander techniques - would a hand plane work well in the cross-grain scenario like this? It's cedar, relatively soft and pretty dry.

Great stuff. Thanks for posting. Ken is a brutal task master isn't he.  [big grin]
my two cents: I wouldn't try to deepen those dadoes, (clean them up ok) at least not assembled. It'll be a PIA. If you can take it apart without wrecking it then I would deepen them.
Again, thanks for posting. It's starting to take shape.
Tim

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #87 on: June 01, 2011, 09:11 AM »
Ken's like my Jiminy Cricket on this.  [tongue]

I grabbed the OF1400 and it'll actually reach even the top-most dado if you face the flat side of the machine toward the neighboring upright. The MFS can fit too.

I suppose I could do this by making a quarter inch spacer, putting it under the outboard end of the MFS, lay that over the existing dado, clamp, route, repeat 43x. It's sort of a self-imposed version of having to write on the blackboard after school.  [big grin]

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #88 on: June 01, 2011, 09:20 AM »
Ken's like my Jiminy Cricket on this.  [tongue]

I grabbed the OF1400 and it'll actually reach even the top-most dado if you face the flat side of the machine toward the neighboring upright. The MFS can fit too.

I suppose I could do this by making a quarter inch spacer, putting it under the outboard end of the MFS, lay that over the existing dado, clamp, route, repeat 43x. It's sort of a self-imposed version of having to write on the blackboard after school.  [big grin]

Jeesh! That's dedication.
Since you don't have the outside supports on the base you could lay it on it's side on a table and work it that way, it would be a darn site easier!
Tim

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #89 on: June 01, 2011, 11:02 AM »
Definitely was thinking about supporting the piece on its side so I could work in a flat, horizontal orientation.

Would I get an eighth of an inch with not too much work via the hand plane?  The router is fast once you've set it up and clamped everything in place, but the setup and changing locations/re-clamping takes time and you can't really finesse the cutting.

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #90 on: June 01, 2011, 01:17 PM »
Definitely was thinking about supporting the piece on its side so I could work in a flat, horizontal orientation.

Would I get an eighth of an inch with not too much work via the hand plane?  The router is fast once you've set it up and clamped everything in place, but the setup and changing locations/re-clamping takes time and you can't really finesse the cutting.

Yes, you should - well er,  it depends on what you call "too much work". Try a couple and see how it goes.
If the dadoes are 3/4" wide I would use the smaller (1/2") shoulder plane or chisel plane.
I would cut some small kerfs on each side of the dadoes with a dove tail or back saw to the depth you want to plane to. I would also score the back or deep end of the dado with a knife so you don't get a lot of tear out and splintering on the back side.
Tim

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #91 on: June 01, 2011, 02:39 PM »
AW, you could have built dozens of these in the time you've talked about them......... [tongue]
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #92 on: June 01, 2011, 03:45 PM »
Wish I had more shop time to dedicate to it, but I have to work on it as other things permit. Reasoning it out beforehand helps. I am really appreciative of the advice people have been giving.

I'll be happy to share information so others can build one of their own. I'm now pretty convinced that only the dedicated would follow through with this. If you just want a planter and not a project, you'd pay Bruce for one ;)

If you're willing to skip the dadoes and secure the shelves with screws, it would save considerable time.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #93 on: June 06, 2011, 09:33 PM »
Still kicking! After a few days hiatus, I spent some time deepening the dadoes after work.

I just scored with a pull saw and used a hand plane. I got through four courses of shelves and also flush cut my dominoes and sander a little. I also marked out the depth of cut for the other shelves, so we'll see how far I can get in the coming day or two.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #94 on: June 09, 2011, 01:24 PM »
Time has been pretty limited this week but I think I have just a dozen or so dadoes left to deepen. I should be able to finish that tonight. It just takes a couple strokes of the pull saw and a couple minutes with the hand plane. I'm taking them all down to ~3/8th inch deep.

For some satisfaction, I'll probably then cut and attach the base pieces.

Then it's on to shelves -

I'll make up another test shelf and fine-tune the miter angle so the back-side of the shelf wedges the shelf in place in the dado.

I mapped out my cutlist on sketchup the other night. I needed to slightly nest the shelf pieces so I wouldn't run out of lumber. The most efficient way to do this is probably to set up two miter saws. Otherwise I'd have to re-set the miter and bevel for every shelf.

During all this time, the baby Strawberry plants have been growing in my back garden. It looks like slugs have been nibbling some of the leaves, so I picked up some thin copper ribbon to ring the garden bed. Apparently slugs won't cross it. (Creates an uncomfortable electric charge.)

The copper got me thinking. I picked up some 16 mil copper sheet that I'd like to use to clad the cap piece. If I can waterproof it with the copper, that may open up some options for gluing something up to form the pyramid structure of the cap.

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #95 on: June 09, 2011, 01:33 PM »
Sounds good, but when was the last time your family's seen you and how are your hands feeling after all that planing?

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #96 on: June 09, 2011, 01:37 PM »
It just takes a couple strokes of the pull saw and a couple minutes with the hand plane. I'm taking them all down to ~3/8th inch deep.

Can't wait to see it. BTW, what kind of plane are you using for the dadoes?

I mapped out my cutlist on sketchup the other night. I needed to slightly nest the shelf pieces so I wouldn't run out of lumber. The most efficient way to do this is probably to set up two miter saws. Otherwise I'd have to re-set the miter and bevel for every shelf.
...ya, lots of cutting there.
Tim

Sounds good, but when was the last time your family's seen you and how are your hands feeling after all that planing?

...ya and all that plane-ing

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #97 on: June 09, 2011, 02:45 PM »
The dado cleanup hasn't been bad at all, actually. It just makes you go a little stir crazy because its 88 dadoes and they're all alike.

The key is just finding the most efficient way to do it. It went a lot faster when I just took the pull saw and made all of those cuts for every dado, rather than changing back and forth between cutting and planeing(?) Changing tools and changing position takes time.

I took your advice on the Veritas medium shoulder plane, Tim. It's a very nice piece and I am sure over the years I'll have plenty of uses for it. The hole through the body makes it very easy to hold the plane and move around the assembled workpiece.  It's cedar, so it's very prone to tear-out, but its not a hard wood.

I think making up a new jig and moving around the OF1400 would have taken longer and been more tiring. The results may have looked more uniform and perfect that way, but I suspect as I cut and install shelves, I'll probably need to plane a little here and there anyway for a good fit.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #98 on: June 11, 2011, 10:34 AM »
I glued and screwed the base cross-braces yesterday and the dadoes are done, wahoo! I'm planning on cutting shelves and/or working on the cap depending on weather.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #99 on: June 11, 2011, 09:54 PM »
Got 75% of the shelves cut and fit today! I'm including a progress shot from earlier in the day. Hopefully I can finish shelves tomorrow and possibly make headway on the cap piece, but I'll have limited to to work on this tomorrow.

After I got the miter saw set up I realized, duh, just flip the stock over and I wouldn't have to be changing miter and bevel angles.



Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #100 on: June 11, 2011, 09:58 PM »
Looks really good!

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #101 on: June 11, 2011, 10:08 PM »
That looks great!
Congratulations, too good for strawberry's or what ever you're gonna put in it.
Tim

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #102 on: June 12, 2011, 11:34 PM »
Thanks so much for the compliments and the advice! I finished the shelves today, did a bit of sanding to break the edges of the shelves slightly, clean up some pencil marks, etc. I need to make the top and I think then it's all over except for the dirt and greenery!

The dadoes could be a little more refined - with some more improvements to the jig, this could have been done a lot faster. I'd like them to be held back a bit further from the edge of the 2x4 too (concealed) but it looks OK. My cedar shelves were a little thicker than my pine test pieces and since I lack a thickness planer, I just relieved the edges of the shelves slightly with the RO90 as I installed them.

Here are a couple more poor quality pictures from my phone. I promise better quality ones before I fill it up.





Now I have to figure out how to execute the cap.

P.S. - My house isn't falling down - camera phone has some crazy lens distortion sometimes.  [eek]
« Last Edit: June 12, 2011, 11:37 PM by awdriven »

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #103 on: June 12, 2011, 11:42 PM »
Cut a square the size you want for the top.  Place it on the top of the tower in the exact position and trace the intersection of the uprights on the bottom side of the top piece.  Route them out, take the piece and give it to me so I can cut your 4 bevels on the top of the top piece on my table saw.


EDIT:  Just make sure the square piece is thick enough to have plenty of meat between the deepest areas that are routed out and the thinnest parts of the top bevels.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2011, 12:07 AM by Ken Nagrod »

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #104 on: June 13, 2011, 12:08 AM »
Check my edit above.

It looks like the tower is propping up the garage header.  [big grin]

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #105 on: June 13, 2011, 09:21 AM »
Wow it came together nicely.
I am almost sorry this thread is coming to an end. I am happy that you persevered.
It's been fun to watch.
Tim

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #106 on: June 13, 2011, 03:16 PM »
That would be awesome, thanks Ken!

The cap as I have it drawn is a 3/4 x 8" x 8" square with an 8" x 8" by 1 inch tall pyramid on top.

My thought was that I'd route out the square base piece and drive a couple screws down through the top of the square into the tops of the uprights to lock them in place. Then place the pyramid on top and use a pair of screws to attach that. That leaves open the option to either copper-clad or not.


Now, down to practical considerations -

I don't have any 8 inch wide stock, so unless I source some, this would be a glue-up.

Do you need this to be one piece in order to make it safe to cut? Any issue with a glue-up? I could probably just drop the height of the pyramid section to 3/4 inch and it could be made up from stock on hand if that works.

I have some 2x4 and 4x4 cedar on hand as well. I may be able to do something with those, but they have radiused edges.

Thanks again, the thread will keep going until some strawberries have been taste tested  [tongue]

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #107 on: June 13, 2011, 09:48 PM »
I ripped the radius edges off some leftover cedar 2x4 and glued it up into an approximately 8.5x8.5x1.5 slab. We'll see how it sands up tomorrow.

Offline BTDT

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #108 on: June 13, 2011, 10:03 PM »
Looking great! I won't be satisfied until I see it in place and full of plants!!! Seriously, I'm glad you have been sharing this project. The design, problem solving and build have been great to follow and read.

When you first showed this planter I was dead certain I would want to build one. I still do. It might not be as large though.

Brad

Offline Greg Powers

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #109 on: June 13, 2011, 10:15 PM »
Seems ashame to fill it with dirt and plants [sad] And cover up all the hard work.
Greg Powers
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Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #110 on: June 14, 2011, 01:25 AM »
Not a bad idea having a 2-piece top.  You're going to have to decide the size of the pyramid for what you consider visually pleasing.  For a copper cover, you could either get a thin sheet and form it over the pyramid piece using things like a large dowel (wooden closet rod), the most difficult areas being the corners at the edges, then trim the excess.  Or get a thick sheet of copper and pound the pyramid top into it using sacrificial wood as the beater block and something like a thick canvas tarp folded up as the cushion for the copper like metal forming with a sandbag.  The easy, quick way out would be cutting the copper to fit and solder the seam(s) but I don't like the idea of the soldered joint out in the weather as it will at some point become brittle and fail plus it won't look as good, in my opinion.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #111 on: June 14, 2011, 11:25 AM »
The glue up looks pretty decent after drying over night. I'll sand it up and cut it to size/shape tonight.

If I can, I'll also glue up a matching 8x8x3/4 base piece.

I should have the copper in hand this evening. It's 26 gauge material, so pretty readily formed. (I say that, but have never done this before.) I understand that normal copper roofing material is 24 gauge.

Ken, just shoot me a PM or e-mail and let me know when it would be convenient to pick up the pyramid stock. I'll check out height options. The glue-up leaves the option to go up to appx 1.5 inches, but that 1 inch rise seems to look pretty good in Sketchup. I don't want the cap to compete with the rest of the piece.

« Last Edit: June 15, 2011, 09:43 AM by awdriven »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #112 on: June 14, 2011, 05:00 PM »
BTDT, if you are interested, I'd be glad to share information to help with a build. I think a 3 or 4 footer would have a lot of the fun but take quite a bit less time.

I'd love to see what people are able to do in terms of improving the design and making the build process Faster, Simpler, Better or all of the above.

I'm glad people have been enjoying the updates and wish I could have given you some more interesting pictures or videos along the way.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #113 on: June 18, 2011, 02:26 PM »
The pyramid glue-up is in Ken's hands for cutting and this morning I glued up the 3/4 x 8 x 8 base. Hopefully I can route the recess in that base piece later today. I made it slightly oversized so I can trim it to match the pyramid.

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #114 on: June 18, 2011, 02:29 PM »
I knew there was something I was supposed to be doing instead of hanging out on here!

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #115 on: June 20, 2011, 08:33 PM »
Many of us are aware of the long time debate as to whether having a table saw is necessary or needed at all after owning the Festool TS saws and guide rails.  I've said it before that I don't think they can totally replace a table saw, so having one would be beneficial for many woodworkers/carpenters, I think.  This just goes to prove that point.  

This is the top cap that AWDRIVEN asked me to make from his cedar glue up.  I made a vertical fixture that entrapped the the 8x8x1.5" block (dimensions after thickness planing it and squaring it up) and clamped it to ride the rip fence on my table saw.  Cut the four sides at a 15 degree bevel.  Final dimensions as it stands are 7 13/16" x 7 13/16" x 1 1/4" height at center and 5/16" thick around the edge after fine tuning it.  The square in the middle of the block is the result of my blade only able to cut 3 9/16" deep per pass.  We are having a discussion about whether to keep the raised square or I can just hand saw and finish sand it to a full pyramid.  If anyone has opinions on which way to go, I'm open to hearing stuff.

I don't see how either of the Festool TS saws would have been able to do this.

There is barrel distortion from the lens of my camera.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2011, 12:44 AM by Ken Nagrod »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #116 on: June 20, 2011, 09:16 PM »
Looks beautiful! A compelling argument for the table saw. A TS75 in CMS wouldn't have had the reach either, I don't think.

The little button on top looks cool - nice when a little detail just reveals itself to you as you work.   I was hoping the endgrain would make a cool pattern and it did :)

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #117 on: June 20, 2011, 09:29 PM »
Looks beautiful! A compelling argument for the table saw. A TS75 in CMS wouldn't have had the reach either, I don't think.

The little button on top looks cool - nice when a little detail just reveals itself to you as you work.   I was hoping the endgrain would make a cool pattern and it did :)


You could look at it that way  [big grin].  I forgot to mention to you how deep of a cut per side I could get with the dimensions of the block, when we first discussed this.  I decided to wait until it was done to offer you the option of keeping it or not.  I figured yesterdays phone pics wouldn't do it justice and you might get some helpful opinions here.

The TS75 mounted in a CMS or the CS70 can't cut anywhere near the depth my table saw can.  I'm pretty sure they're limited to 70mm and my saw cuts to 90.5mm.

By the way, for any of our proficient hand tool users out there, yes this could have been done with a raised panel cutting hand plane, but they're pretty hard to come by and this was a freebie so power tools it is.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2011, 10:05 PM by Ken Nagrod »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #118 on: June 20, 2011, 11:51 PM »
Just trimming the raised part off flush is an option too and might look good.

I took the dimensions and plugged them into Sketchup, here are the two side by side. I think it would look better mated up with a half inch thick piece instead of three quarter?



« Last Edit: June 21, 2011, 12:18 AM by awdriven »

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #119 on: June 21, 2011, 12:12 AM »
Keep in mind, if I trim off the square button, you can't go back to the pyramid shape without cutting down the size of the block.

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #120 on: June 21, 2011, 12:25 AM »
Think it would be hard to hand saw it? My pull saw has a really flexible blade, it would wander.  Looks like I oopsed the image urls in my last post - fixed them.

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #121 on: June 21, 2011, 12:27 AM »
Should be easy work for my Lie Nielsen dovetail saw.  [cool] ..... are you sure you want to do this ? ? ?

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #122 on: June 21, 2011, 07:57 AM »
Sure, let's go pointy. I am sure :)

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #123 on: June 21, 2011, 09:03 AM »
I think it would look better mated up with a half inch thick piece instead of three quarter?

I thought the 3/4  would look better but after looking at your Sketchup model I agree the 1/2" looks a little better. It's lighter and not so heavy looking.

are you sure you want to do this ? ? ?

ya, I agree no button on top. Although I like it, it looks a bit like the top of a pagoda. Actually the whole tower has that feel to it.

Tim

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #124 on: June 21, 2011, 10:10 AM »
Thanks Tim, very helpful to have  a little design input near the end of the project - I've been staring at it too long!

I've got about 75 strawberry plants going, most with 2 to 8 strawberries growing on them. The trick to choosing a site is that I'll have to find something that allows each side to get reasonable sun.

Online waho6o9

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #125 on: June 21, 2011, 10:32 AM »
+1 for pagoda. Nice project, thanks for posting.

Offline jonny round boy

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #126 on: June 21, 2011, 12:51 PM »
The trick to choosing a site is that I'll have to find something that allows each side to get reasonable sun.

You mean you're not putting it on a motorised turntable, so they all get the sun?  [doh]

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Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #127 on: June 21, 2011, 01:40 PM »
Ok, just so we're very clear and it's official and notorized, you want the square button cut to give it the full pyramidal shape?

Offline awdriven

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Re: Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #128 on: June 21, 2011, 03:14 PM »
Is there a supplemental Domino instruction manual handy that I can use to solemnly swear?

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #129 on: June 21, 2011, 03:43 PM »
Top cap modified and complete including the sanding out of some blade tear out that could be seen but not felt on the two long grain beveled faces.

Again, barrel distortion in the lens.

« Last Edit: June 21, 2011, 06:40 PM by Ken Nagrod »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #130 on: June 21, 2011, 03:59 PM »
It looks fantastic, especially for something that the birds are going to be decorating soon!

Ken and I should be able to meet up tomorrow and we'll drop this on top of the 3/4 inch base piece I glued up and then decide if the base piece needs to be planed down a little in thickness.

I used a couple 5mm dominoes to register the glue-up this time, so it would be necessary to plane a little off each of the two faces, or the dominoes might get uncovered.

If it is easier for you, Ken - I can just give you a 7 foot length of 1x4 stock that would be less fuss to run through the planer. Cutting and gluing it up is easy.

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #131 on: June 21, 2011, 04:12 PM »
2 foot length is good enough to avoid dealing with the removal of snipe marks.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2011, 06:42 PM by Ken Nagrod »

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #132 on: July 02, 2011, 10:12 PM »
Placed it in the yard today - it's just pending installation of the cap piece.











Leveled it, filled 'er up with topsoil and transplanted the strawberry plants into it. I'll post some more pictures in the next day or two with the plants in there - but it looks kind of thin. I think it could hold a hundred little plants! (I think I put in about 65)

Offline Tim Raleigh

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #133 on: July 05, 2011, 12:14 AM »
Great work, nice pics.
Tim

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #134 on: July 18, 2011, 09:57 AM »
'Planted' pictures still to come - Ken dropped off the cap pieces and I installed it this weekend. It was a bit tedious because I was going for a centered, snug fit and that meant that it wasn't as simple as finding center and slapping down the MFS.

After cutting the mortice, I fixed the flat piece with four stainless screws driven down into the 2x4 uprights. Then I drove four screws upward into the pyramid section from below. The two faces didn't mate perfectly, possibly because screwing down the flat piece may have distorted it a bit. Since I had already glued a number of other joints, I broke out the TiteBond II again. Put the clamps to it and its looking pretty good now. I just need to sand the edges to flush them and remove some glue residue.

In terms of performance, the plants seem mostly to like the planter. I am still getting flowers and strawberries. The top tier soil does tend to dry out more quickly because it has more exposure to air and sunlight and is also just a smaller mass of soil. Those plants are 'ok', but not as happy as tenants on the lower floors. I'm hoping that if I can get the top plants to bulk up in size, the foliage will shade the soil. Soil washout was a bit of a concern to me, but so far it is seeming not to be much of an issue. It took about half a yard of soil to fill.

Thanks again to Ken for the help on this! The top really finishes it nicely. Everyone who has seen it really likes it.

Offline mparka

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #135 on: August 16, 2011, 03:30 PM »
whoa... what an incredible skill and effort!  I gotta keep my wife from seeing this thread over my shoulder.  Otherwise, it is definitely going to be added to "Honey, do" list..

Offline awdriven

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Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #136 on: August 17, 2011, 09:10 AM »
Thank you! It's been holding up well and now that the heat wave is over, the strawberry plants are happier - but someone/something keeps eating my strawberries before I can pick them!

I am getting a little separation of some of the top-pyramid pieces. The other lower glue joints seem to be doing OK. I'm going to fill in the minor gaps with some sealant. and clad that top part with some copper when I have the chance.

Offline awdriven

  • Posts: 286
Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #137 on: March 02, 2012, 03:46 PM »
I just ordered some new plants to re-populate the tower for this year. I have some survivors, but finishing the project in July was really far from ideal for the plants.

This year I am going to get them in early and give them a healthy helping of organic fertilizer to get them nice and bushy.

Some leaf coverage should help retain more moisture in the dirt. It should also help prevent soil washout. I did see some soil get washed out of the tower, but without leaf cover I am not surprised it happened.

There's still plenty of time to build yours ;)

Offline awdriven

  • Posts: 286
Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #138 on: March 23, 2012, 09:15 AM »
I'll try to get some pictures up soon - I planted about 100 bare-root strawberry plants into the tower a week ago and gave them a good shot of fertilizer. I'm getting some new growth on just about all of them. :)

Offline sochart

  • Posts: 1
Re: Festool this - Strawberry Tower project
« Reply #139 on: May 16, 2017, 07:49 PM »
Hi everyone. Do you have a sketchup copy of the plans please ?.