Author Topic: Garden Shed paint removal / renovation after 20 years - tool? paper? tips?  (Read 1385 times)

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Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 133
Hi there,

I am in the process of renovating or at least keeping the garden shed at my Moms house intact.
It has not seen any care for the last two decades and that shows!
The boards are all bowed and cupped and have deep weathering in them.

I have kind of gone at it without much thought. So I spent the last weekend sanding down the fist two walls.
For tools I have:
- ETS EC 150/5
- RO 90
- CTL-SYS
- CTM 26 E AC

I used mostly granat. I started with 80 grit but soon learned that that was not aggressive enough. So I went for 60 grit, because I had nothing else.

I really like the ETS EC from a handling perspective, because of the light weight and the low center of gravity.

For all the corners and hard to reach places I went for the RO 90 and it is a wonderful little beast with the triangular pads. I recommend getting the "long triangular pad" as well. It really helped to get behind ducts and into angles...

I still need to do two sides and some more sanding on the front.
Do any of you have any tips?
What would be a good sand paper to speed things up?
Saphire?
Abranet?

Would the RO 150 be quicker?
I like the RO 90, but holding it up against the wall is a lot harder than the ETS EC. I fear the RO 150 might just be too heavy of a machine...

Thank you for your input! [emoji4]



*edit to make the title a little more telling.. ;)
« Last Edit: June 26, 2017, 06:40 PM by grobkuschelig »

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Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 133
Re: Garden Shed paint removal / renovation after 20 years
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2017, 04:40 PM »
Here, this is the only real "before" shot I have.
My Mom rocking the RO 90 on the window... ;)

Online Pnw painter

  • Posts: 93
If you've got the ETS EC 150/5 I wouldn't run out to buy a RO150. It might be a little faster, but on a vertical surface it'll be much more cumbersome to operate for long periods of time.

It's possible that a wood stripper might be a lot faster and easier.
Woodrich makes an excellent wood stripper and brightener. They also sell a small sample kit, which might be worth a try.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B014GF4LSQ/ref=mp_s_a_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1498587097&sr=8-1-fkmr0&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=hd-80+woodrich



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Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1947
You posted Paint Removal, but your shed looks more like an old Stain Job, not paint. Yes? No ? Anyway, looks like you're ready for Paint or more Stain at this point with all that bare sanded wood.  Nice work, and I'm tired just looking at the pics...... [wink]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Naildrivingman

  • Posts: 259
You posted Paint Removal, but your shed looks more like an old Stain Job, not paint. Yes? No ? Anyway, looks like you're ready for Paint or more Stain at this point with all that bare sanded wood.  Nice work, and I'm tired just looking at the pics...... [wink]

I'm thinking solid body stain, which is more like paint than stain. Either way, it looks like great progress to me.
Dance with who brung ya...

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 133
Thanks for the replies.
You are right, partly. ;)
Most of it is solid body stain, I think. The last wall (wind/weather-facing side) was painted over. That still need to be done...

I ordered some Abranet ACE to try out. I have used the standard Abranet, but only finer grits until now. I got p80, because the coarser grits have hole-patterns (not totally lining up with festool).

The biggest issue is not getting rid of the color/stain, but that the weathering "cracks & ridges" go deep into the wood.
I will take this as a motivation to not leave any project that needs to be maintained on a semi regular basis untouched for so long. If it would have been sanded down 5 or ten years ago, instead of just partial painting over, it would have been a much easier job. Then and now. [emoji51]

Has anyone of you tried Abranet ACE?
What about the festool papers other than Granat?

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1947
Thanks for the replies.
You are right, partly. ;)
Most of it is solid body stain, I think. The last wall (wind/weather-facing side) was painted over. That still need to be done...

I ordered some Abranet ACE to try out. I have used the standard Abranet, but only finer grits until now. I got p80, because the coarser grits have hole-patterns (not totally lining up with festool).

The biggest issue is not getting rid of the color/stain, but that the weathering "cracks & ridges" go deep into the wood.
I will take this as a motivation to not leave any project that needs to be maintained on a semi regular basis untouched for so long. If it would have been sanded down 5 or ten years ago, instead of just partial painting over, it would have been a much easier job. Then and now. [emoji51]

Has anyone of you tried Abranet ACE?
What about the festool papers other than Granat?
   If you're painting Oil Based Paint over the now sanded wood, you can use a Linseed Oil product as a 'sealer' of sorts to brush into those cracks before putting that Oil Based Primer on it.
 I've used Epifanes Easy Flow for this before Oil Primer, or for where I wasn't going to put Stain or Paint but wanted to help preserve the wood. I think most of the similar products are just Linseed Oil mixed with a solvent to help seep into the wood, so you could mix your own as well.
 If you're applying Stain, I'm not sure if anything goes on before the stain unless someone here can chime in[ Shout out to Scott B].....
 Saphir is another Festool Abrasive you could try.
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 133
Thanks @leakyroof

I have a "UV+mildew protection primer" which will go on before the stain (yes, special stain-primer), which should male it more durable.

I am basically sanding away all those ridges. This should not leave too many cracks or so.

I will try and pick up a 10-pack of coarse Saphir at my local festool dealer, just in case the Abranet does not perform... ;)