Author Topic: How to guide OF 1010 properly along a curved edge?  (Read 3208 times)

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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3613
Re: How to guide OF 1010 properly along a curved edge?
« Reply #30 on: October 23, 2017, 09:44 AM »
Some Milky/translucent plexiglass cover over the LEDs.

Exactly...this is what I'm doing for some built-in cabinets. The translucent cover does a great job in reducing the individual LED "spotlight" effect. Most of the strip LED suppliers offer these covers in different widths and lengths.

The 2nd photo gives you an idea on how even the LED beam spread is with the cover in place.

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Offline shu

  • Posts: 12
Re: How to guide OF 1010 properly along a curved edge?
« Reply #31 on: October 23, 2017, 10:24 AM »
@Gregor,
Thanks so very much for the impressive illustrations. The solution is very straightforward and easy to follow. Are the template bits set in your link the only thing I need to buy?

@antss,
Thanks a lot for helping others understanding my questions!

@Cheese,
Thanks. I do prepare to try a cover if the test result is not ideal.


Offline shu

  • Posts: 12
Re: How to guide OF 1010 properly along a curved edge?
« Reply #32 on: October 23, 2017, 10:48 AM »
It seems the bit set is 1/2" which can not be used on 1010.

Am I looking at something like this?

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 2974
Re: How to guide OF 1010 properly along a curved edge?
« Reply #33 on: October 23, 2017, 11:05 AM »
It seems the bit set is 1/2" which can not be used on 1010.

Am I looking at something like this?

Try this rabbeting bit set from Lee Valley. It has an 8mm shank.

Offline antss

  • Posts: 1378
Re: How to guide OF 1010 properly along a curved edge?
« Reply #34 on: October 23, 2017, 12:19 PM »
Gregor , your solution is very elegant , drawings through and your English is much better than my Deutch.

It has a too many steps and requires too much material for my tastes though.

The sub base and pin method Alex and I suggest requires less steps, material , and router bits to accomplish.  Even the  CMT flex template and a mortise bit would be less complicated.

What matters though, is what shu finds to be most effective.  He seems to have reservations about guiding the router along the edge with an index pin(s).  So if your way with all the templates and router bits gets him to the finished project , it's a good one.

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 550
Re: How to guide OF 1010 properly along a curved edge?
« Reply #35 on: October 23, 2017, 12:42 PM »
It seems the bit set is 1/2" which can not be used on 1010.

Am I looking at something like this?

Try this rabbeting bit set from Lee Valley. It has an 8mm shank.
Yes, something like that would do in case it enables the dimensions you need.
As I wrote:  the ones I linked were just to show how these kind of bits look - as I have no clue how these are named across the ocean and which places sell ones that last while not being overpriced... I just used a google image search.

A full set with a thin bit, a thick bit and a pile of different sized bearings might be interesting in case you plan to do more template work in the future, as such one allows to create and manipulate a wide range of templates (creating positive/negative ones for inserts, perfectly joining two kinds of wood along a non-straight seam, other fun stuff).
« Last Edit: October 23, 2017, 12:51 PM by Gregor »

Online Alex

  • Posts: 5478
Re: How to guide OF 1010 properly along a curved edge?
« Reply #36 on: October 23, 2017, 01:19 PM »
@Michael Kellough,

Is there any video or illustration I can use to understand @Alex's two pin method?

Why ask Michael and not Alex? Hm.  [scratch chin]





Shopped this together with a pic I found on the net. The two pins on the base will let you follow any curve.

The steeper the curve the closer the pins need to be together. With a smoother curve you can space them a bit wider for better stability.

Just take it slowly when you work and make sure both pins stay in contact with the edge. Since the slot is completely hidden you don't need to worry too much about precision.
 

Offline antss

  • Posts: 1378
Re: How to guide OF 1010 properly along a curved edge?
« Reply #37 on: October 23, 2017, 01:25 PM »
Quote
Since the slot is completely hidden you don't need to worry too much about precision.

When the question first came up I was thinking this was for a shelf where you could see the slot when installed.   Now knowing that isn't the case , I'd probably just mark a line 30mm off the edge and free hand the groove.

Won't be as neat as one of these other methods, but it'll be done in an hour and ready to install lights.

Offline shu

  • Posts: 12
Re: How to guide OF 1010 properly along a curved edge?
« Reply #38 on: October 23, 2017, 06:45 PM »
@Alex,

Thanks a lot for the photo and explanation. I now fully understand what the two pin means.

@antss

I'd eager to learn and explore all possible solutions.
If I have conservation, my only concern is:
If the distance between the bit and the line connecting the two pins is fixed(we call it A), the setback of the cut slot to the edge depends on the shape of the curve. If it's convex, the setback will be shorter; if concave, longer. And the more curvature, the more difference.

As the change of the curve is consistent, I have no way to change the distance A accordingly. Therefore I will end up have a slot that never parallels to the original curved edge.

PS. I told a lie that I actually need to have the slot 6mm off the edge, in lieu of 30mm. So precision will be required and freehand is not an option here.

Can I summerise:
Two pin method give bests control, but is more suitable for a curve with unchanged curvature, when precision required.

@Michael Kellough @Gregor, Thanks, I will go for the Lee Valley one.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2017, 07:22 AM by shu »