Author Topic: How to square up lumber with my MFT and TS after the jointer/planer?  (Read 2651 times)

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Offline Slider613

  • Posts: 37
I have an MFT 3 and a TS 75, after the Jointer and Planet, I usually take my wood the table saw to rip a parralel edge to make a four squared board.

I know I can draw a line on the board and put the track on that line to square it up.

But when I am doing allot of boards this will take allot of time and likely will be less precise than on my table Saw.

Any tips and tricks?

I saw the Parralel guide, is that the answer?
TS 75 EQ, Router 1400 OF, Carvex PS420 EQB, Rotex 90 and 125, ETS 150/3, Domino DF 500 + Kit, CXS Drill set, T18 Drill Set, MFT/3, Rails 75" and 2x 55" with Connector and Case, Compact Cleaning Kit, Sys 4 TLsort/3, CT 48 with 27mm and 36mm anti static hose, Sys MFT-FX set.

Plus a whole stack of accessories

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Offline Getmaverick

  • Posts: 81
The way I do it is I straight line rip my board first with the TS. I cut to approximate length on my miter saw. I then joint one face on the jointer then plane to thickness.
Now I can cut to width on the table saw. From there I square one end then flip and cut to length. You can use the mft in place of the miter saw if you need to.

Offline Bohdan

  • Posts: 791

I know I can draw a line on the board and put the track on that line to square it up.

I saw the Parralel guide, is that the answer?

There is no need for a line. Just place the rail on the board to clear the rough edge and cut.

A parallel guide is handy for when you are cutting boards to a repeatable width but don't use the Festool one, the after market ones are much better and easier to use.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 662
The TS is the answer, and since you have one why not use it?

There is nothing sacrilegious about using a TS is there. It may not
be Festool green but I don't think you will get struck by lightning.

Use each tool for what it's best at. This is one area where a TS excels,
processing lumber. Save your TS75 and MFT for other chores where
they perform best.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Slider613

  • Posts: 37
Thanks everyone, I guess I'll just stick to the usual method of squaring the final side on my table saw.

I was curious if there was an easy Festool way to do the job, but I'll just stick to what I've been doing.
TS 75 EQ, Router 1400 OF, Carvex PS420 EQB, Rotex 90 and 125, ETS 150/3, Domino DF 500 + Kit, CXS Drill set, T18 Drill Set, MFT/3, Rails 75" and 2x 55" with Connector and Case, Compact Cleaning Kit, Sys 4 TLsort/3, CT 48 with 27mm and 36mm anti static hose, Sys MFT-FX set.

Plus a whole stack of accessories

Offline Corwin

  • Posts: 2405
While your table saw is made for this job, this job can also be done with your MFT and track saw if you use an appropriate setup. Well, that is assuming that your workpieces are short enough to process on the MFT.

I don't have a table saw in my shop, so I have a few options for setting up the track saw. I can do this using the fenced sled that I illustrate in the MFT Zero-Clearance Fence & Fenced Sled thread. Maybe this will give you some ideas.
Looks like your rabbit joint is a hare off! ;)

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 1975
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
I don't understand why you would not be using your table saw since you indicate you have one.
Birdhunter

Offline Slider613

  • Posts: 37
I don't understand why you would not be using your table saw since you indicate you have one.

I do use my table saw, as I said in the opening post.

I asked a question, can this be done on a MFT easily, apparently not, so I will continue with the table saw.
TS 75 EQ, Router 1400 OF, Carvex PS420 EQB, Rotex 90 and 125, ETS 150/3, Domino DF 500 + Kit, CXS Drill set, T18 Drill Set, MFT/3, Rails 75" and 2x 55" with Connector and Case, Compact Cleaning Kit, Sys 4 TLsort/3, CT 48 with 27mm and 36mm anti static hose, Sys MFT-FX set.

Plus a whole stack of accessories

Offline LZ

  • Posts: 18
You might consider GRS-16 from TSO products. Do not have one yet, but it is something that should work if you are not close to your TS.

Offline curiousdork

  • Posts: 44
  • I code and woodwork.
I have an MFT 3 and a TS 75, after the Jointer and Planet, I usually take my wood the table saw to rip a parralel edge to make a four squared board.

I know I can draw a line on the board and put the track on that line to square it up.

But when I am doing allot of boards this will take allot of time and likely will be less precise than on my table Saw.

Any tips and tricks?

I saw the Parralel guide, is that the answer?

From what I've seen, it's not nearly as fast.  With a table saw, you can straight line rip to width once you have your fence set at the desired width.  I'm currently in this same boat where I have a TS 75 but no table saw (garage rebuild is still in the design process) so I have to make do with what I got.  I'm currently renting a shop so I do majority of my work there (going to leave that shop once the garage is done) and, yes, the table saw is a lot faster for parallel rips.

Offline curiousdork

  • Posts: 44
  • I code and woodwork.
You might consider GRS-16 from TSO products. Do not have one yet, but it is something that should work if you are not close to your TS.

I talked to Hans over the phone and he didn't recommend this approach but since I just procured my GRS-16 I'll have to give it a try.  I have an 8/4 red oak slab that I'm going to face and edge joint with  hand planes.  Once I have my true face and edge, the plan is to square up one end with the saw and use that as reference surface for the straight line rip.  Message me in a week or so since I have a tendency to forget.  :)

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1728
I think others are right. I don't think the Parallel Guides are the right solution. I guess I don't see what's wrong with what you are currently doing. For me, the fastest and most accurate way to rip a board to final width is on a table saw with a high quality combination blade that leaves a smooth edge. Once the board is jointed on one edge and face, then planed to thickness, I almost always use a table saw to rip it to the right width (sometimes with one pass over the jointer to be sure it's smooth). Then, I cut the board to it's final length using my TS55 and MFT with the fence and guide rail. I know the fence/miter gauge isn't the most popular part of the system around here, but it works for me and the result is a perfectly square cut. So crosscutting to the final length is the last step for me.
Randy