Author Topic: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks  (Read 17719 times)

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Offline Grasshopper

  • Posts: 594
Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« on: February 12, 2015, 06:33 PM »
I have been attempting to master the lock-miter joint on my CMS-VL router table and I was fortunate enough to find the Wood Whisperer's thread where he built some really nice newel posts using lock miter joints.  Check it out below-

http://festoolownersgroup.com/member-projects/new-stairway-overhaul-(before-after)/msg373211/#msg373211

In an effort to not completely derail that thread, I thought it would make sense to have a dedicated thread to discuss tips and tricks to setting up a lock miter joint on the router table.

On the thread mentioned above there were many good suggestions for setting up the lock-miter. 

Please chime in with your workflow with this frustrating joint (it is at least very frustrating to me), those with the CMS I'm particularly interested in hearing from.

Aspiring DIY'er (hence the name "grasshopper" as I am looking to learn from all the masters on the FOG)- TS 55, OF 1400, MFT/3, VS600 Dovetail Jig, MFS700+ MFS2000 extension profiles, Kapex, Kapex UG set, T12 Li set(x2), CT22, Domino, Carvex, RO90, RO150, MFK700, CMS-VL, Qwas super pack & Cool Wife.

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Offline Grasshopper

  • Posts: 594
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2015, 06:39 PM »
To kick things off, I am including some of the tips that were shared in the other post:

I'd love to see workflows featuring the CMS, especially ways to cut the vertical pieces in multiple passes (without screwing up your setup).  I'm not exactly sure how you could do a stop block with the CMS fence.


Paul Marcel did a nice video on using the Valfor Tools GrooveCenter and 2-Axis Depth Gauge to set up a lock miter bit.



Tim



Nice work on the posts!  I'm a huge proponent of the lock miter bit.  I use it on all my kitchen cabinet/vanity drawers.  You don't need to plunk down any hard-earned on fancy gauges.  I did a tutorial on a drawer build on sawmill creek using 2 pieces of scrap it's on post #3:  Lock Miter Tutorial and our own Peter Parfitt made a rather excellend Youtube showing the setup in more depth.



For anyone wanting to use the lock miter bit, you might want to check out Infinity Tool's LMM-002 Lock Miter Master Jig for aligning the bit to the fence and to the workpiece.  It's also mentioned in an article in Fine Homebuilding.  There's also a good on setting up the bit.  It won't eliminate fine tuning, but it will save a ton of time setting up the bit.  YMMV...

Aspiring DIY'er (hence the name "grasshopper" as I am looking to learn from all the masters on the FOG)- TS 55, OF 1400, MFT/3, VS600 Dovetail Jig, MFS700+ MFS2000 extension profiles, Kapex, Kapex UG set, T12 Li set(x2), CT22, Domino, Carvex, RO90, RO150, MFK700, CMS-VL, Qwas super pack & Cool Wife.

Offline Baremeg55

  • Posts: 613
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2015, 09:58 PM »
The last time I checked out the lock miter bits, though some while back, you could also get the matching set up guide blocks.  While you can ease into the correct settings, I wouldn't bother without the guides.  For the small price you pay, you won't waste as much wood or your time.....  Of course, once you have the correct depths/fence settings, you can make your own guide blocks.....

Offline Grasshopper

  • Posts: 594
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2015, 12:36 AM »
Do you know If CMT has a guide block set? (Or if there are compatible guide blocks for CMT bits).

setup just inching along is a huge pain.

I'm also struggling to find the best way to run the vertical piece along the CMS fence.

The last time I checked out the lock miter bits, though some while back, you could also get the matching set up guide blocks.  While you can ease into the correct settings, I wouldn't bother without the guides.  For the small price you pay, you won't waste as much wood or your time.....  Of course, once you have the correct depths/fence settings, you can make your own guide blocks.....
Aspiring DIY'er (hence the name "grasshopper" as I am looking to learn from all the masters on the FOG)- TS 55, OF 1400, MFT/3, VS600 Dovetail Jig, MFS700+ MFS2000 extension profiles, Kapex, Kapex UG set, T12 Li set(x2), CT22, Domino, Carvex, RO90, RO150, MFK700, CMS-VL, Qwas super pack & Cool Wife.

Offline Brent Taylor

  • Posts: 471
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2015, 07:33 AM »
The last time I checked out the lock miter bits, though some while back, you could also get the matching set up guide blocks.  While you can ease into the correct settings, I wouldn't bother without the guides.  For the small price you pay, you won't waste as much wood or your time.....  Of course, once you have the correct depths/fence settings, you can make your own guide blocks.....
This is the method that I also use, & for all the thickness that I use.

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1680
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2015, 07:54 AM »
Do you know If CMT has a guide block set? (Or if there are compatible guide blocks for CMT bits).

setup just inching along is a huge pain.

I'm also struggling to find the best way to run the vertical piece along the CMS fence.

The last time I checked out the lock miter bits, though some while back, you could also get the matching set up guide blocks.  While you can ease into the correct settings, I wouldn't bother without the guides.  For the small price you pay, you won't waste as much wood or your time.....  Of course, once you have the correct depths/fence settings, you can make your own guide blocks.....

Rockler used to a lock miter bit with a setup block. Experience with Rockler bits is inconsistent, but I've found that, if you aren't going to use a particular bit more than for one or just a few projects, their bits can be a good buy. If you're going to use on numerous projects, I'd say that Rockler bits aren't the way to go. Sometimes they have sales on bits that make them even more attractive as an option for single projects or only sporadic use.
Randy

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3299
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2015, 08:17 AM »
The last time I checked out the lock miter bits, though some while back, you could also get the matching set up guide blocks.  While you can ease into the correct settings, I wouldn't bother without the guides.  For the small price you pay, you won't waste as much wood or your time.....  Of course, once you have the correct depths/fence settings, you can make your own guide blocks.....

It's a piece of cake to make your own setup blocks.  There are numerous places to buy UHMW plastic strips, 3/4" x 4" x 48".  Once made, they hold up very well, unlike MDF. 

- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline hrrb

  • Posts: 183
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2015, 10:04 AM »
Do you know If CMT has a guide block set? (Or if there are compatible guide blocks for CMT bits).

setup just inching along is a huge pain.

I'm also struggling to find the best way to run the vertical piece along the CMS fence.


...just had a quick browse through the CMT main catalogue. It doesn't seem they got at set up block.

Kind regards
Henrik

Offline Grasshopper

  • Posts: 594
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2015, 11:25 AM »
Thanks for the input thus far!  Man, setup is a pain.  I am still trying to adjust for the fence depth.  Back a mm, forward a mm.  I feel bad for the scrap pile that I have accumulated setting this up.

This tutorial was helpful because it has a few pictures that indicate when the cutter is too high or low on the router base side , and whether or not too much or too little cutter is exposed for the fence side.

http://stuswoodworks.com/2009/04/setting-up-a-locking-miter-bit/
Aspiring DIY'er (hence the name "grasshopper" as I am looking to learn from all the masters on the FOG)- TS 55, OF 1400, MFT/3, VS600 Dovetail Jig, MFS700+ MFS2000 extension profiles, Kapex, Kapex UG set, T12 Li set(x2), CT22, Domino, Carvex, RO90, RO150, MFK700, CMS-VL, Qwas super pack & Cool Wife.

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1680
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2015, 12:10 PM »
Here is a link to a setup jig that Infinity Tools started selling a year or so ago. I have no experience with it, but it allegedly works for the thickness woods they indicate on their site. There are 2 jigs. You can buy either depending on what you need or you can buy the set of 2. As far as I can tell they are supposed to work with any lock miter bit of the size listed in their specs. (Sorry the link didn't appear as an actual link but you can copy into your browser.)

http://www.infinitytools.com/Router-Bit-Set-Up-Jigs/products/1330/

If someone buys and uses it, I'd like to hear how well it works. As described, it looks like it would take the guesswork out of the setup process and get it very close, if not right on, the first time.
Randy

Offline Grasshopper

  • Posts: 594
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #10 on: February 13, 2015, 12:45 PM »
I will have to try that.  The part that is proving to not be a piece of cake (operator error of course), is setting up the bit well enough the first time to then be able to make a setup block.

Sheesh this is very frustrating the first time.  Way more annoying than I thought it would be (45 degree miters with dominos for joinery is looking pretty tempting about now  :)

I received a PM from another user who said he was reluctant to remove the bit after finally setting it up and joked that he'd almost need to buy a new router table and router, keeping the first one setup as the dedicated lock miter station.  I now totally know what he means.

It's a piece of cake to make your own setup blocks.  There are numerous places to buy UHMW plastic strips, 3/4" x 4" x 48".  Once made, they hold up very well, unlike MDF.
Aspiring DIY'er (hence the name "grasshopper" as I am looking to learn from all the masters on the FOG)- TS 55, OF 1400, MFT/3, VS600 Dovetail Jig, MFS700+ MFS2000 extension profiles, Kapex, Kapex UG set, T12 Li set(x2), CT22, Domino, Carvex, RO90, RO150, MFK700, CMS-VL, Qwas super pack & Cool Wife.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3299
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2015, 01:18 PM »
Here is a link to a setup jig that Infinity Tools started selling a year or so ago. I have no experience with it, but it allegedly works for the thickness woods they indicate on their site. There are 2 jigs. You can buy either depending on what you need or you can buy the set of 2. As far as I can tell they are supposed to work with any lock miter bit of the size listed in their specs. (Sorry the link didn't appear as an actual link but you can copy into your browser.)

http://www.infinitytools.com/Router-Bit-Set-Up-Jigs/products/1330/

If someone buys and uses it, I'd like to hear how well it works. As described, it looks like it would take the guesswork out of the setup process and get it very close, if not right on, the first time.

That's the one I mentioned here

- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

  • Posts: 987
    • Jim Kirkpatrick Woodworking
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #12 on: February 13, 2015, 01:47 PM »
Setup blocks that are made or purchased are really just to ball park your initial setup.  3/4" Plywood as everyone knows, is not 3/4" thick, it's slightly thinner.  So a template made with 3/4" stock will not work with 3/4" plywood.  You will need to make several different templates for different thicknesses of stock.  And even then, I've found that plywood can vary sheet to sheet so when using a 2nd sheet of ply of the same grade and species, you may need to check the bit height.

Setting the bit height for the first time is pretty straightforward.  Having a nice router lift in your table and a digital readout makes life a little easier and a whole lot faster.  In fact, I don't know how you can proceed without them.  You can start my eyeballing the center of the bit on your work piece and with 2 scrap pieces, mill them lying flat on your table like in the picture.  Flip one over and join them together as shown:


After the bit height is set, the fence adjustment is next and is quite easy.  With a scrap test piece of stock, run it flat on the table and the fence is set correctly when the bit stops reducing the length of your test piece.  Once the bit height and fence distance is correct, mill another piece of stock lying flat and save for future setups.


I think this is one of the greatest and easiest joints ever for making drawers!
« Last Edit: February 13, 2015, 01:53 PM by Jim Kirkpatrick »

Offline RobBob

  • Posts: 1094
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #13 on: February 13, 2015, 05:01 PM »
Here is a link to a setup jig that Infinity Tools started selling a year or so ago. I have no experience with it, but it allegedly works for the thickness woods they indicate on their site. There are 2 jigs. You can buy either depending on what you need or you can buy the set of 2. As far as I can tell they are supposed to work with any lock miter bit of the size listed in their specs. (Sorry the link didn't appear as an actual link but you can copy into your browser.)

http://www.infinitytools.com/Router-Bit-Set-Up-Jigs/products/1330/

If someone buys and uses it, I'd like to hear how well it works. As described, it looks like it would take the guesswork out of the setup process and get it very close, if not right on, the first time.

That's the one I mentioned here.

So, what are the pros/cons of the red metal jigs vs. the white plastic jigs?

Offline bkharman

  • Posts: 1880
Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #14 on: February 13, 2015, 05:09 PM »
Quote


So, what are the pros/cons of the red metal jigs vs. the white plastic jigs?

The red metal jigs allow you to adjust quickly to the center of any thickness wood the bit supports.

The blocks are good for a standard size. Say ¾" or 1"

I have the Infinity baby bit and really like it. Has a great cutting edge and with the red jig, you can setup in just a few minutes.

Cheers. Bryan.
People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?

Offline RobBob

  • Posts: 1094
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #15 on: February 13, 2015, 05:42 PM »
Ah, I see now.  Thanks for the info.

Offline Grasshopper

  • Posts: 594
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #16 on: February 13, 2015, 06:27 PM »
Jim,

Your images and tutorial are fantastic!  The photo of the completed joint gives me hope.

I am about to pull my hair out trying to get the bit height just right.  I have the CMS-VL table, so no digital readout on the lift.  I see how that could be quite handy now. 

Back to kill some more poplar 1x in an effort to set this thing up.

Setup blocks that are made or purchased are really just to ball park your initial setup.  3/4" Plywood as everyone knows, is not 3/4" thick, it's slightly thinner.  So a template made with 3/4" stock will not work with 3/4" plywood.  You will need to make several different templates for different thicknesses of stock.  And even then, I've found that plywood can vary sheet to sheet so when using a 2nd sheet of ply of the same grade and species, you may need to check the bit height.

Setting the bit height for the first time is pretty straightforward.  Having a nice router lift in your table and a digital readout makes life a little easier and a whole lot faster.  In fact, I don't know how you can proceed without them.  You can start my eyeballing the center of the bit on your work piece and with 2 scrap pieces, mill them lying flat on your table like in the picture.  Flip one over and join them together as shown:
(Attachment Link)

After the bit height is set, the fence adjustment is next and is quite easy.  With a scrap test piece of stock, run it flat on the table and the fence is set correctly when the bit stops reducing the length of your test piece.  Once the bit height and fence distance is correct, mill another piece of stock lying flat and save for future setups.
(Attachment Link)

I think this is one of the greatest and easiest joints ever for making drawers!
(Attachment Link)
Aspiring DIY'er (hence the name "grasshopper" as I am looking to learn from all the masters on the FOG)- TS 55, OF 1400, MFT/3, VS600 Dovetail Jig, MFS700+ MFS2000 extension profiles, Kapex, Kapex UG set, T12 Li set(x2), CT22, Domino, Carvex, RO90, RO150, MFK700, CMS-VL, Qwas super pack & Cool Wife.

Offline Grasshopper

  • Posts: 594
Help me solve my Lock Miter Woes
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2015, 12:23 AM »
OK, after spending hours getting the lock miter bit setup properly, I finally with glee made a setup block for future projects.  Before my hopes were dashed to pieces of course.

See photo of "acceptable" test piece that can be a setup block:


Now I ripped a couple long test pieces (around 40" long or so) and wanted to see the lock miter in all its glory, and I really have no idea what went wrong:

You can see the end of the joint is way off


Throughout the board, there are tons of valleys and chatter.  I assume operator error for sure.  The vertical piece (the one against the fence) took a ton of digs and looks terrible.

I used the CMS-VL, and cinched down the feather boards, and used a push stick.  The feather boards were pretty tight if that makes a difference.  I was pretty close to throwing the bit in the trash, but a cooler head prevailed and said I should "ask the FOG". 

See the chatter:





I realize that I'm new to the router table business and this is likely operator error, which is probably why I am baffled by the outcome.  Your insight is very appreciated. 
« Last Edit: February 14, 2015, 12:28 AM by Grasshopper »
Aspiring DIY'er (hence the name "grasshopper" as I am looking to learn from all the masters on the FOG)- TS 55, OF 1400, MFT/3, VS600 Dovetail Jig, MFS700+ MFS2000 extension profiles, Kapex, Kapex UG set, T12 Li set(x2), CT22, Domino, Carvex, RO90, RO150, MFK700, CMS-VL, Qwas super pack & Cool Wife.

Online deepcreek

  • Posts: 613
    • TimberFire Studio
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #18 on: February 14, 2015, 12:53 AM »
In my experience, lock miter bits in a router table are best suited for small boxes and other relatively short joinery.

For long lengths, you really need a shaper with a power feeder.
Joe Adams
TimberFire Studio
Houston, Texas

http://www.facebook.com/timberfire

Offline Linbro

  • Posts: 195
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #19 on: February 14, 2015, 07:03 AM »
I don't think the bit is to blame - so don't throw it away! More likely the CMS isn't up to it, or your stock isn't true?
Is the fence set correctly? Is the outfeed half of the fence in the right position? Your 3rd and 4th pic look like the result of the two fence halves being lined up, instead of them being offset from each other, causing the board to 'drop into' the cutter.

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3446
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #20 on: February 14, 2015, 08:13 AM »
How many passes and what router (1400?) are you using in the CMS. It does look like the stock is moving away from the bit as you are feeding it. Use stacked feather boards on the infeed and out feed side for the vertical pieces. Support the out feed and infeed sides so the board stays stable.
Tim

Offline hrrb

  • Posts: 183
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #21 on: February 14, 2015, 08:33 AM »
Holy Crab Cake!  [scared]
How could it go that wrong? Sorry for being straightforward...that looks terrible! [sad]

Did you do it in one pass or 2 to 3 passes? I can't really see the thickness of the stock from your photos but if it's too thick and you try to chew it in one bite it's hard to ensure that the featherboards keep the stock tight to the fence and table top. And then you might get a poor result.

When using a router in a table it is very important that your featherboards keep the stock tight to the fence and table top. I myself have learned that the hard way.

If you do the job in 2-3 passes it might help you. You might have a look at Paul Marcels video. Doing the job in 2-3 passes is exactly what he does.

Ohh...and don't go too fast! Go nice and slowly untill you master the technique.

Don't give up yet  [wink]

Kind regards
Henrik

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3299
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #22 on: February 14, 2015, 09:58 AM »
I've found that I need to use a sacrificial fence (1/2" plywood) to keep the piece being routed straight with the fence for the entire pass through.  That has eliminated the gouging like shown on the horizontal piece.  The challenge is in keeping the vertical piece from rocking as it passes through the bit. 

- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Grasshopper

  • Posts: 594
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #23 on: February 14, 2015, 11:20 AM »
Thanks for the many replies.  I am certain this is operator error.  I am optimistic you can help me solve this.

My router table experience is very limited, so I've checked my ego at the door and am humbly seeking your experience  ;)

Here are responses to the questions:

DeepCreek - That makes sense, I'm still hoping to make this work for a pair of newel posts I want to build.

Linbro - I was actually considering throwing the bit away due to frustration.  I'm certain the bit is perfect as it is brand new.  Regarding my fence setup, the two fences are lined up with each other.  I've never run a stepped fence (and with the lock miter, it was a bear to set the fence up having to account for a MM here or there to get things lined up. )

Tim - I am using the OF 1400, and hogging this out in one pass.  I realize that multiple passes would be ideal, I just can't figure out an easy way to do that on the CMS.  Dialing in the hight and fence literally took many hours of fine tuning.  I am using the Festool stock feather boards (the black push board that presses the stock down, and the clear plastic "fingers" that presses the stock against the fence).  As I have no miter slot, I'm not seeing an easy way to add feather boards to the out feed and infeed sides as you suggest.

With the CMS fence so touchy, and no place to put "stop blocks" I cannot envision how I can graduate the fence backward to accomplish multiple passes.  I hope that I am missing something basic.


Hrrb - I agree that it looks terrible.  In fact, its the worst I've seen.  I had to check my ego at the door to post these pictures for sure.   [wink]

The stock is 3/4" thick and it is Poplar.  As I had mentioned above, I hogged these out in one pass, which I assume is a major contributor to the outcome.  Simply put, I cannot envision how to make multiple passes using the CMS-VL router table, and stock feather boards.  The feather board is set to as tight as I can get it to go.  I don't know how to ease in with multiple passes with my current setup.

Willy - I see where a sacrificial fence would be helpful.  Any tips on how to integrate one with the CMS fence.

See pictures below of my setup. 

See stock tight against my fence using all Festool factory feather board and guards:



View of bit from the top showing fence running mostly parallel:


Other angle of fence:


View of what the stock sees as it is being fed to the bit.  Stock is held pretty tight against the bit and fence:

« Last Edit: February 14, 2015, 11:22 AM by Grasshopper »
Aspiring DIY'er (hence the name "grasshopper" as I am looking to learn from all the masters on the FOG)- TS 55, OF 1400, MFT/3, VS600 Dovetail Jig, MFS700+ MFS2000 extension profiles, Kapex, Kapex UG set, T12 Li set(x2), CT22, Domino, Carvex, RO90, RO150, MFK700, CMS-VL, Qwas super pack & Cool Wife.

Offline bkharman

  • Posts: 1880
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #24 on: February 14, 2015, 12:34 PM »
Grasshopper.

There are many ways to accomplish the "multi pass" method. Since you know the fence can be a beast to mess with (stock CMS one that is). You might try putting a temporary fence or base off of your final cut.

I am tying this on my phone so it is hard to explain but if you set your final cut (fence and bit depth) and then have sacrificial boards in the table and against the fence, you can route out a shallow pass and then take that board away, put a smaller shim in and run again.

I think Paul Marcel has a video on this, or maybe it was Peter but there are some out in YT land.

I use an Incra fence which makes the above method moot, but the above procedure definitely works!  Not for all bits, but it does for the lock miter bit.

Cheers. Bryan.
People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?

Online deepcreek

  • Posts: 613
    • TimberFire Studio
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #25 on: February 14, 2015, 01:37 PM »
I'm not going to knock the CMS or the 1400 (my favorite handheld but underpowered for what you are doing) but it sounds like they may be part of the problem.

I have a Woodpecker table and router lift with a Hitachi 3-1/4HP variable speed router.  My lock miter bit is an Amana.  I have hogged out long lengths of soft stock (Red Cedar) for some exterior trim.  I added a lot of extra featherboards and had to leave extra length so I could cut off the tail end of the boards if things got squirrely as I exited the cut.  I made it work but the results were not perfect (which is my always my goal).
« Last Edit: February 14, 2015, 01:41 PM by deepcreek »
Joe Adams
TimberFire Studio
Houston, Texas

http://www.facebook.com/timberfire

Offline Linbro

  • Posts: 195
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #26 on: February 14, 2015, 03:13 PM »
When you run it with the stock flat on the table,  does the cutter remove much material at the point of the mitre?

Offline Grasshopper

  • Posts: 594
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #27 on: February 14, 2015, 03:15 PM »
When you run it with the stock flat on the table,  does the cutter remove much material at the point of the mitre?

The pass on the flat does take out a lot of material. The flat pass wasn't as bad as the vertical pass.
Aspiring DIY'er (hence the name "grasshopper" as I am looking to learn from all the masters on the FOG)- TS 55, OF 1400, MFT/3, VS600 Dovetail Jig, MFS700+ MFS2000 extension profiles, Kapex, Kapex UG set, T12 Li set(x2), CT22, Domino, Carvex, RO90, RO150, MFK700, CMS-VL, Qwas super pack & Cool Wife.

Offline Linbro

  • Posts: 195
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #28 on: February 14, 2015, 03:33 PM »
When you run it with the stock flat on the table,  does the cutter remove much material at the point of the mitre?

The pass on the flat does take out a lot of material. The flat pass wasn't as bad as the vertical pass.

Yeah, but at the point of the mitre?

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3299
Re: Lock Miter Tips and Tricks
« Reply #29 on: February 14, 2015, 06:41 PM »
Willy - I see where a sacrificial fence would be helpful.  Any tips on how to integrate one with the CMS fence.

Here's a shot of how I did one with 3/4" MDF.  It's a little too thick  for my purposes, which is why I suggested using 1/2" plywood. 

 [smile]

Edit: Just added a shot of the end result of using the sacrificial fence and the Infinity setup jig.  I had to make several fine-tuning adjustments, but this is the result.  Then - I thought to measure the thickness of the MDF.  It's greater than 3/4", so I get to do the process all over again with stock that is exactly 3/4" so I can make a set of UHMW setup blocks. 

« Last Edit: February 14, 2015, 06:49 PM by Sparktrician »
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young