Festool Owners Group

FESTOOL DISCUSSIONS => Festool How To... => Topic started by: webpp on June 30, 2017, 01:23 AM

Title: MFK700 Functionalities
Post by: webpp on June 30, 2017, 01:23 AM
Hello guys,

I have a question regarding the MFK700 router. I know that is it an excellent trim router for the purpose of trimming edge banding (both ABS/PVC and solid wood trim).

My question is can I use it to trim melamine edge using a compression bit to get a perfect side without any chipping? In other words, I would use my TS-75 track saw to cut my melamine 2mm more than needed, then I would use my MFK700 with a compression bit to go over the edges to get a perfect chip-free edge. Can this process be done using your hands on top rather than mounting the MFK700 into a custom router table?

Also, beside a trim router, what other function can we do with the MFK700?

Thanks guys!
Title: Re: MFK700 Functionalities
Post by: grobkuschelig on July 01, 2017, 09:10 AM
Hi.
This is a very interesting topic. Unfortunately I can not yet add anything substantial.

Did you try the Melamine blade on the TS-75 in conjunction with tape on the cut line?

That is my plan for an upcoming project with double sided melamine plated MDF...
Title: Re: MFK700 Functionalities
Post by: Sparktrician on July 01, 2017, 03:48 PM
I prefer using an Amana No-File bit (https://www.amazon.com/Amana-Tool-47150-No-File-Laminate/dp/B000637V9E) when using laminates, and I suspect that it would work well for you. 
Title: Re: MFK700 Functionalities
Post by: ear3 on July 02, 2017, 11:54 AM
I've used that bit on Melamine.  Works great.

I prefer using an Amana No-File bit (https://www.amazon.com/Amana-Tool-47150-No-File-Laminate/dp/B000637V9E) when using laminates, and I suspect that it would work well for you.
Title: Re: MFK700 Functionalities
Post by: webpp on July 03, 2017, 12:09 AM
I prefer using an Amana No-File bit (https://www.amazon.com/Amana-Tool-47150-No-File-Laminate/dp/B000637V9E) when using laminates, and I suspect that it would work well for you.

I've used that bit on Melamine.  Works great.

Problem is that I'm asking about melamine that is already finished and ready to cut.

That bit looks like it is good for over hanging melamine sheets that you put over MDF with contact cement then you use that bit.
Title: Re: MFK700 Functionalities
Post by: Sparktrician on July 03, 2017, 04:51 PM
I prefer using an Amana No-File bit (https://www.amazon.com/Amana-Tool-47150-No-File-Laminate/dp/B000637V9E) when using laminates, and I suspect that it would work well for you.

I've used that bit on Melamine.  Works great.

Problem is that I'm asking about melamine that is already finished and ready to cut.

That bit looks like it is good for over hanging melamine sheets that you put over MDF with contact cement then you use that bit.


No, that's where a flush-cutting bit does best.  The No-File bit eases the cut corner just enough to make chipping the cut edge far more difficult.  It's very easy to set right when using the MFK 700. 
Title: Re: MFK700 Functionalities
Post by: webpp on July 04, 2017, 12:01 PM
No, that's where a flush-cutting bit does best.  The No-File bit eases the cut corner just enough to make chipping the cut edge far more difficult.  It's very easy to set right when using the MFK 700.

Care to elaborate further and explain to us the procedures, when you have the time?

Thanks.
Title: Re: MFK700 Functionalities
Post by: Sparktrician on July 05, 2017, 05:36 PM
No, that's where a flush-cutting bit does best.  The No-File bit eases the cut corner just enough to make chipping the cut edge far more difficult.  It's very easy to set right when using the MFK 700.

Care to elaborate further and explain to us the procedures, when you have the time?

Thanks.

Sure.  When you glue down a top surface and have a small amount hanging over the sides, you use a flush-cut bit with a bottom bearing to find the sides and cut the excess top off flush without cutting the side surfaces.  Once that is done, you have a very sharp 90 degree corner left over from the flush-cut bit.  Then you load up the No-File bit which also has a bottom bearing.  That No-File bit eases the transition corner by rounding it over smoothly and consistently.  Clear?
Title: Re: MFK700 Functionalities
Post by: Bert Vanderveen on July 06, 2017, 01:03 PM
No, that's where a flush-cutting bit does best.  The No-File bit eases the cut corner just enough to make chipping the cut edge far more difficult.  It's very easy to set right when using the MFK 700.

Care to elaborate further and explain to us the procedures, when you have the time?

Thanks.

Sure.  When you glue down a top surface and have a small amount hanging over the sides, you use a flush-cut bit with a bottom bearing to find the sides and cut the excess top off flush without cutting the side surfaces.  Once that is done, you have a very sharp 90 degree corner left over from the flush-cut bit.  Then you load up the No-File bit which also has a bottom bearing.  That No-File bit eases the transition corner by rounding it over smoothly and consistently.  Clear?

Regarding that sharp angle: I thought that using the 1.5 degree table on the MFK700 took care of that? The method is of course different — as in a different angle of attack than using a flush cutting bit.
I may be wrong about this, so please correct me.
Title: Re: MFK700 Functionalities
Post by: Sparktrician on July 06, 2017, 04:59 PM
No, that's where a flush-cutting bit does best.  The No-File bit eases the cut corner just enough to make chipping the cut edge far more difficult.  It's very easy to set right when using the MFK 700.

Care to elaborate further and explain to us the procedures, when you have the time?

Thanks.

Sure.  When you glue down a top surface and have a small amount hanging over the sides, you use a flush-cut bit with a bottom bearing to find the sides and cut the excess top off flush without cutting the side surfaces.  Once that is done, you have a very sharp 90 degree corner left over from the flush-cut bit.  Then you load up the No-File bit which also has a bottom bearing.  That No-File bit eases the transition corner by rounding it over smoothly and consistently.  Clear?

Regarding that sharp angle: I thought that using the 1.5 degree table on the MFK700 took care of that? The method is of course different — as in a different angle of attack than using a flush cutting bit.
I may be wrong about this, so please correct me.
 

The 1.5° base will give you just that, and you'll still have a sharp 88.5° transition.  The No-File bit gives you a round-over transition that is less susceptible to chipping and far easier on the hands in the case of a table-top.  Take a good look at the profile of the bit.  If nothing else, buy one and give it a try in contrast with the 1.5° base and a straight-cut bit.  I think you'll see the value.