Author Topic: Question about dovetails  (Read 1345 times)

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Offline Mark Kolkmann

  • Posts: 5
Question about dovetails
« on: October 19, 2017, 12:09 AM »
I built some dovetail drawers this week and left the pins slightly proud. How would you normally flatten these? Plane, Belt sander, Saw, Orbital sander?

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Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5271
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Question about dovetails
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2017, 12:14 AM »
Sand with a Rotex or ETS.

Tom

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 216
Re: Question about dovetails
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2017, 12:53 AM »
This renowned furniture maker uses a belt sander (5:30 or so):

http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/09/22/chris-becksvoort-the-dovetail-master-at-work

Be careful not to round the edges when you sand, or in the case of drawers, the reveal will be uneven,

Since I cut dovetails only by hand, I never mix the process with a power tool. However, I never have to deal with protruded pins because I set the marking gauge a hair shy of the thickness of the stock and so all the pins are below the surfaces of the tail boards. I plane the boards till they are flush with the pins.

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3992
Re: Question about dovetails
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2017, 07:42 AM »
Those flat "no kerf" trimming saws are nice for things that really poke out.
You may not have that...

I sometime put a wad of duct tape on a file for rough work so I can get close to a surface without scaring the wood where the pointy end of the file rests.

After that a plane is nice... Or a sanding block. (Some why to keep a crisp edge.)
Or the edge gets a chamfer or a a small radius later, but not a taper like the old maps of the earth with ships falling off.

Offline Wooden Skye

  • Posts: 1059
  • My little girl was called home 12-28-15
Re: Question about dovetails
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2017, 08:31 AM »
Plane or sander.
Bryan

TS 55, (2) 1400 Guide Rails, 1900 Guide Rail, MFT/3, Domino DF 500, 2 domino systainers, ETS 150/3, RO 90, CT 26, (2) OF1400, RO 150. RTS 400, LR 32 set, PS300 jigsaw, 3 abrasive systainers, (2) sys toolbox, (2) sys mini, clamps and other accesories

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 580
Re: Question about dovetails
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2017, 11:15 AM »
Those flat "no kerf" trimming saws are nice for things that really poke out.
You may not have that...

I sometime put a wad of duct tape on a file for rough work so I can get close to a surface without scaring the wood where the pointy end of the file rests.

After that a plane is nice... Or a sanding block. (Some why to keep a crisp edge.)
Or the edge gets a chamfer or a a small radius later, but not a taper like the old maps of the earth with ships falling off.

I also like the saw/plane combination, but try to keep the dovetails just a little proud so the saw is not needed.  Because I have gotten scratches from the saw before, I also sometimes use tape to protect wood from that.

Offline ShadyMaple

  • Posts: 22
Re: Question about dovetails
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2017, 05:24 PM »
Get one of the sonic tools with a Flush trim blade.

Then, just sand it nice and clean.

Works great for this sort of thing.

Offline Chris Cianci

  • Posts: 2
Re: Question about dovetails
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2017, 05:30 PM »
Hi
I will use a flush trim bit w a bearing on a router, after you have a smooth flat surface for the router to ride on (i.e. No glue drops, or uneven spots , I use a plane or chisel to achieve that)
Best