Author Topic: ripping a live edge slab  (Read 18735 times)

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Offline Wooden Skye

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #30 on: January 04, 2015, 05:48 PM »
I would use the trion or carvex.  It seems whatever you do will need the edge cleaned up, so being able to do in one pass without flipping the board would be best in my opinion.
Bryan

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Offline Chris99

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #31 on: January 04, 2015, 05:48 PM »
I just went through the same process with my TS75. I was almost able to rip through my piece, which was 4" thick when I started.

If you decide to use your track saw and have to flip the piece over, I would suggest you make a shallow cut as your first cut and then make the flip. After that do another, deeper pass. This way the slab is still strong enough to withstand the flip.

Good luck. Show some photos if you can.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2015, 05:50 PM by nerfball »

Offline BMH

  • Posts: 359
Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #32 on: January 04, 2015, 06:05 PM »
I did a live edge walnut shelves with the same issue. I did the cut with the TS55 flip it and did the same thing. You really need to mark the piece carefully and check 10 times before cutting. I was off by maybe 1/4-1mm along the whole 5 feet cut. Cleaned up the edges with a low angle jack plane. If I had to glue a couple of pieces together I would consider dominoing the pieces to keep them perfectly aligned. and reduce the amount of planing and sanding.

Offline lenick01

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #33 on: January 04, 2015, 11:23 PM »
Thanks to everyone for the great suggestions.  I'm up in Kingston Ontario and doubt I'd find any fancy equipment around town.  I like the idea of the TS55/Carvex which allows me an excuse to buy yet another green tool but isn't nearly as spendy as the  TS75!

The slab is acutally white oak, 52" at it's widest and about 29" at the other end.  It likely weights somewhere around 300 pounds.  It was cut from a >400 year old perfectly healthy tree in Southern Ontario and was on the property of some guy who wanted a new house  in that spot.  The trunk was cut into 3 22 foot pieces, not a knot in any of them.  Personally I think it's a crime that a municipality would allow this but at least I can try and make something out of it that will keep it around for some years to come.

Offline JJ Wavra

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #34 on: January 04, 2015, 11:55 PM »
I would just use your 55 with a rip blade.  If you don't think you can get it lined up just offset the blade by about half  its width so that you go through but end up with a step.  Then use a router with a bottom bearing to clean up and flush the joint. The nice thing is you will only lose a little more than the kerf plus a little offset and will end up with a pretty clean joint.
JJ

Offline WastedP

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #35 on: January 05, 2015, 12:41 AM »
Where do you live, no one does anything here for 20.00. I would charge a 100.00 to come to my shop an take my time like that. And I am betting most companies wont even deal with something like that. What if they screw that piece up, then they are on the line for the material for a 5.00 profit? Actually, I dont think I would even take the piece, there is no upside for me as a business. For FOG friend maybe not someone off the street.

Owl hardwood would do it, with a 2 week lead time. But only if you purchase from them and they wont guarantee a glue joint.

Western Montana, where one out of every 217 residents is a cabinetmaker.  Supply may outstrip demand here.

The guys I have worked with won't turn away any work, they'll figure out a way to fit it in, it wouldn't be "while you wait".  They would charge me 15 minutes (that's their minimum), the machine rate last I checked was $165 per hour.   With the blade change, I could see those three cuts taking ten minutes.  That shop gives me a good price because I used to work there, and I bring them my business, as well as the occasional pie.   Making $5.00 off those three cuts would be better for them than having the machine idle and the operator doing clean up.  They would do it for anyone off the street, not just me.

They aren't on the line for the material if I pay for machine time for specific cuts.  If I wanted them to produce a specific product for me, as opposed to carrying out my instructions on my material, then I'm sure their prices would be a lot higher.  They definitely won't give a guarantee on the glue joint unless they glued it up themselves, but they do glue-ups from stock cut on their bridge saw without any additional machining.  If they cut a large slab down the middle and it let some tension out of the stock and it bowed, it would be up to you to figure out how to proceed.

Even if you figured in the cost of pies, it would be cheaper than buying a new tracksaw.

Offline wow

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #36 on: January 05, 2015, 05:00 AM »
Even if you figured in the cost of pies, it would be cheaper than buying a new tracksaw.

WastedP, I think you just just made a very logical argument against buying a tool.

What were you thinking?  [scared]

Just kidding, of course. And as far as the bribery, I personally use fudge...
« Last Edit: January 05, 2015, 05:58 AM by wow »
Trying to be one of the most helpful members on the FOG.

Offline Pixel

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #37 on: January 05, 2015, 05:46 AM »
I'm looking for some pointers on how to rip a 3 inch thick live edge slab.  I have a 10 foot long slab that's destined to become a dining room table.  Unfortunately, it's not wide enough per my significant other.  I'm planning on ripping it down the middle and essentially making a panel out of it by gluing in another foot wide 3 inch slab in the middle.

I thought about using a table saw but I think it would be nearly impossible due to the weight and size.  I have a TS 55 but won't get through the full thickness - maybe making a cut and then flipping it over?  I'm worried that I won't line up the 2 cuts properly.  Of course this might be an excuse to get a TS 75....

Any tips would be appreciated!

Mike

Forget all the option apart from your favoured option, buy a TS 75, by far the better saw, you can then retire your underpowered 55 to the back of the shop

Offline kcufstoidi

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #38 on: January 05, 2015, 07:21 AM »
Thanks to everyone for the great suggestions.  I'm up in Kingston Ontario and doubt I'd find any fancy equipment around town.  I like the idea of the TS55/Carvex which allows me an excuse to buy yet another green tool but isn't nearly as spendy as the  TS75!

The slab is acutally white oak, 52" at it's widest and about 29" at the other end.  It likely weights somewhere around 300 pounds.  It was cut from a >400 year old perfectly healthy tree in Southern Ontario and was on the property of some guy who wanted a new house  in that spot.  The trunk was cut into 3 22 foot pieces, not a knot in any of them.  Personally I think it's a crime that a municipality would allow this but at least I can try and make something out of it that will keep it around for some years to come.

There is good woodworkers group in Kingston you should make contact with. There are many ways to cut your piece but to do it accurately for gluing find someone with a large sliding table saw. It makes the cuts safe, accurate and easy,  I know of one person in that club that has the right saw for this work. Festool saws are good for a lot of projects but unfortunately this isn't one of them.

John

Offline rvieceli

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #39 on: January 05, 2015, 07:45 AM »
I'm going to be contrary, not just to be contrary but because I believe it.

DON"T RIP IT APART.

I work in slabs all the time and that sounds like a magnificent slab. For a dining room table, your fifty two inch end is probably going to be to wide. For many people a width between 30 and 42 inches is more than acceptable. We are currently using a 30 inch wide DR table and it works fine.

Since you will have to figure out the rip, take some time to rethink the plan. That is a massive table. Are you going to keep the overall length around the ten foot mark?

Many folks can't visualize these pieces in their home environment. I'd suggest one of two things. If you can wrestle the piece into the spot it will occupy then haul it in and lay it on some sawhorses or the existing table and live with it for a while.

If that won't work, then throw a couple of pieces of plywood or maybe foam board under the slab. Trace the outline and cut it out with a jig saw and flop that in your space.

Offline Mavrik

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #40 on: January 05, 2015, 09:35 AM »
I wouldn't mind seeing a picture of the slab ...
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Offline Tinker

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #41 on: January 05, 2015, 12:04 PM »
I'm going to be contrary, not just to be contrary but because I believe it.

DON"T RIP IT APART.

I work in slabs all the time and that sounds like a magnificent slab. For a dining room table, your fifty two inch end is probably going to be to wide. For many people a width between 30 and 42 inches is more than acceptable. We are currently using a 30 inch wide DR table and it works fine.

Since you will have to figure out the rip, take some time to rethink the plan. That is a massive table. Are you going to keep the overall length around the ten foot mark?

Many folks can't visualize these pieces in their home environment. I'd suggest one of two things. If you can wrestle the piece into the spot it will occupy then haul it in and lay it on some sawhorses or the existing table and live with it for a while.

If that won't work, then throw a couple of pieces of plywood or maybe foam board under the slab. Trace the outline and cut it out with a jig saw and flop that in your space.

a lot of people think about the maximum crowd they might have and they over build.  Then they have a table that is somewhat overbearing for every day use or even for the occassional  times when they might have 3 or 4 extra people for a meal or two.  Maybe once a year will they have the number they figured on.  Some people will compensate for excess company by crowding a little bit.  We always went that route.  If crowding was too crowded, we set out a card table or two.  Others will be quite happy with a largely oversized table and try to stay within the limits of table without crowding.  They would be quite happy with too much space for the every day use.  It just depends on what they will be satisfied with.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tom Bellemare

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #42 on: January 05, 2015, 12:57 PM »
I have a friend who's a successful attorney and who bought a really big, fancy cherry dining room table. All I've ever seen on it was overflow, bulk groceries and unorganized laundry fresh from the drier...


Tom
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Offline Tinker

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #43 on: January 05, 2015, 01:14 PM »
I have a friend who's a successful attorney and who bought a really big, fancy cherry dining room table. All I've ever seen on it was overflow, bulk groceries and unorganized laundry fresh from the drier...
Tom

Tom, were you looking in our house? [scared] Our table is not over sized.  BUT all the rest-----
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Joseph C

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #44 on: January 05, 2015, 02:12 PM »
By far the best suggestion thus far:

I'm going to be contrary, not just to be contrary but because I believe it.

DON"T RIP IT APART.

I work in slabs all the time and that sounds like a magnificent slab. For a dining room table, your fifty two inch end is probably going to be to wide. For many people a width between 30 and 42 inches is more than acceptable. We are currently using a 30 inch wide DR table and it works fine.

Since you will have to figure out the rip, take some time to rethink the plan. That is a massive table. Are you going to keep the overall length around the ten foot mark?

Many folks can't visualize these pieces in their home environment. I'd suggest one of two things. If you can wrestle the piece into the spot it will occupy then haul it in and lay it on some sawhorses or the existing table and live with it for a while.

If that won't work, then throw a couple of pieces of plywood or maybe foam board under the slab. Trace the outline and cut it out with a jig saw and flop that in your space.
TS75, OF1010, PS300, Domino500, MFT/3, CT22 + WCR, CT MIDI, RS2e, RO150, ETS150, DS400, RO90, Grex 2" micropinner (festool green), and packing everything else into systainers, too.

Offline Joseph C

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #45 on: January 05, 2015, 02:19 PM »
The TS75 is going to be your best bet for not screwing up ;)
Jigsaw blades, even the fanciest Carvex blades, can deflect; one very minor tip of the router with a 3" long bit will be a bigger error at its far end.
If I had to make such a cut, and presuming all is planed flat/parallel, I would make the rips (two, right next to each other) with the track saw and then rough cut the waste.  Use a router with flush trim bit from the other side to clean up the last ~1/4" of depth that the saw couldn't hit.

But again, I think not touching it is best.
TS75, OF1010, PS300, Domino500, MFT/3, CT22 + WCR, CT MIDI, RS2e, RO150, ETS150, DS400, RO90, Grex 2" micropinner (festool green), and packing everything else into systainers, too.

Offline lenick01

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #46 on: January 05, 2015, 02:40 PM »
If it was up to me, I wouldn't touch it either!  Things don't always go my way unfortunately.

We actually do use the 8 foot table we have now to most of its capacity on a regular basis.  We will likely end up losing some length as I'm planning on inserting a walnut slab that's closer to 9 feet long, making it look like a wooden dining room table runner.

Offline blk65brd

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #47 on: January 05, 2015, 03:27 PM »
Sean,
Here in the Pacific Northwet you simply need to check craigslist, there are numerous suppliers of live edge slabs.
Richard

Some really good pointers for cutting thick wood.
Not to get off subject but where do you guys get your live edge timber?
Sean

Offline sunmtnforge

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #48 on: January 22, 2017, 05:04 PM »
To anyone with suggestions: I need to cut one side off of a live edge 3 1/4" thick 40"x12' long fir slab.  I work alone and it is rather heavy and prefer not to turn it.  The cut is not straight and has several right angles (I will hand finish the 90 degree corners) to it but needs to be perpendicular.  Half of it needs to connect with another slab.  After reading this article I am considering buying a cheap(15$ China) 2 flute(3 inches long) straight router bit and try to cut down around 2 3/4" on the first pass then dropping the bit to pick up the last 1/2 inch or so.  I don't want to spend a lot of money on a new tool that I won't use very often(but will consider any options).  Does anyone out there have any ideas?  Thank you for your consideration.

Offline Poindexter

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #49 on: January 22, 2017, 05:30 PM »
I do this all the time in super hard woods.  And the best suggestion has already been stated, but if you want to spend money buy a rip blade for the TS55.  Make the cut you want, flip it over and make the same cut from the other side.  If you don't nail it, then a little edge sanding, a few runs on the jointer, or some hand planing will make it glue ready.

A rip blade with less teeth will make short work of oak and shouldn't give you any kickback. 

Offline Kee Squared

  • Posts: 7
Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #50 on: January 22, 2017, 05:36 PM »
Straight edge clamped to the piece. Circular saw first cut full depth of the blade. Jigsaw or Sawzall the remainder staying close to the cut off side of the cut. Hand plane the edge flat or use a sander. If you want it perfect buy a track saw and get help to flip the piece over. I wouldn't recommend using the router to make the cut. From my experience routers can get unwieldy when making deep dados. If anything use the router to make the clean up pass.

Offline willips

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #51 on: April 05, 2017, 02:17 AM »
Wouldn't an HK85 on a rail have nailed this?

Offline Upscale

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #52 on: April 05, 2017, 06:03 AM »
I'm looking for some pointers on how to rip a 3 inch thick live edge slab.  I have a 10 foot long slab that's destined to become a dining room table.

Sounds like you could use a bandsaw and a suitable hand plane.
DF 500 Q Domino, CT22, Carvex PSBC 420 Jigsaw, 7 systainers and several accessories. I'm just a rank Festool beginner, but I'm trying hard. :) Oh yeah, now that I own a FOG hat 2011 edition, I guess I'm not such a beginner anymore.

Offline egmiii

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #53 on: April 05, 2017, 09:03 AM »
I'd suggest finding someone local with a sliding table saw. Place slab on table, clamp, push, done.

Offline HarveyWildes

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #54 on: April 05, 2017, 10:04 AM »
Since we cannot get sword saws here in the states, has anyone looked into the prazi sword saw add on.  You can install it on most worm drive circular saws.  Other than that, you need a big beam saw.

In addition to the Prazi beam cutter, there are also a variety of chain saw mill attachments for chain saws that would make quick work of this job.  The straightness of the cut depends on the quality of the ripping jig, which you must make yourself.

Or, for less than the cost of a [TS75/85 or OF2200 or Domino 700] + dust extractor + long rails + accessories, you can just buy the whole mill: https://woodlandmills.ca/us/product/722-portable-sawmill/ or http://www.baileysonline.com/Forestry-Woodcutting/Portable-Sawmills/Logosol-Portable-Sawmills/Logosol-M8-Chainsaw-Mills/.  No need for a ripping jig.

I've always wanted to get one of these, but since I now have more local urban lumber than I will ever use before I kick the bucket, I can't justify it.

Offline dmccririe

  • Posts: 25
Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #55 on: April 07, 2017, 08:24 AM »
Some really good pointers for cutting thick wood.
Not to get off subject but where do you guys get your live edge timber?
Sean

I have quite a few sawmills near me.  I go there and tell them what I want and they point it out or acquire it for me.

Offline David Dublin

  • Posts: 3
Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #56 on: April 08, 2017, 09:26 PM »
Use the ts 55 then the slot created will be easy to guide a trion/carvex though and jut the last inch . Then flip the halves and use a bearing guided flush cut bit in your router to leave the jigsaw cut flush with the ts55 cut .? Or the HK 85 looks nice [big grin]
« Last Edit: April 08, 2017, 09:31 PM by David Dublin »

Offline demographic

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Re: ripping a live edge slab
« Reply #57 on: April 09, 2017, 07:04 AM »
I'd put a fiver on it being roughsawn so by the time its even close to being surfaced flattish it will be small enough to do with a TS75.

There you are, the excuse you need to buy a TS 75.

You can thank me later.