Author Topic: Routing Stopped Chamfers  (Read 1867 times)

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Offline RobNJ

  • Posts: 26
Routing Stopped Chamfers
« on: June 11, 2014, 11:26 AM »
Hello all - I'm, relatively new to woodworking and luckily discovered Festool and this great forum early on!

I just got my Domino and started my first project using it - a garden gate with a number of 2"x2" cedar spindles.
I was thinking of putting a stopped chamfer on all four edges of each spindle.
The cut would be stopped on both sides a few inches from the ends, kinda like this:



What would be the easiest way to do so?  I'm using an OF1400 and considering three methods
1) Putting the router on a rail and using stops on each end
2) I have a CMS - though unsure how exactly to start the cut safely in the middle
3) Using the router freehand with homemade stop blocks.

Anyone have a strong view on which is easiest?
Thanks!
Rob

P.S. Is it just me, or do you feel like every time you use the Domino it feels like cheating!!! So quick, easy and precise   [big grin]

Offline NiteWalkerGR

  • Posts: 75
Re: Routing Stopped Chamfers
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2014, 12:18 PM »
I usually go with #3, sometimes not even using stops, but routing to a pencil mark. Easy enough.

And yes, using the domino does feel like cheating. :-)
It's a wonderful tool.

Online RL

  • Posts: 2584
Re: Routing Stopped Chamfers
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2014, 12:22 PM »
All three of your methods are viable, but because the spindle can be narrow, it doesn't offer much support to the router base with method #3, and you can tip the router off-square. This can be very dangerous if the bit catches and the router can fly away. (Done it, cue wet trousers.) Method #1 is difficult because the guide rail won't easily sit on the spindle securely.

Personally, I like to use the second method on the CMS. The CMS method offers the most control. Here's how I set it up and do it.

With the bit lowered out of the way but with the fence lined up, I place the spindle on the table and mark the extremes on the fence with a pencil where the spindle needs to stop. Stop blocks won't work here because the spindle is too long.

To route the lamb's tongue at the left end, you place the right end against the fence and pivot the left end into the bit. Then route the profile along the spindle until you reach the mark on the right end, when you pivot the right end away from the fence.

Done properly this is not a dangerous procedure, but when pivoting, place your hands either side of the bit instead of right in front of it.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2014, 12:25 PM by RL »
I like green.

Offline RobNJ

  • Posts: 26
Re: Routing Stopped Chamfers
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2014, 12:44 PM »
Thanks Nite and RL - I really appreciate the quick feedback!

Since I have this giant hunk of aluminum in my basement, I'm going to give it a try on the CMS first.
I really like the idea of the pivot method for bringing the piece to the bit.  Thanks for the explanation - was super clear and well-explained!
(Also the bonus safety tip was nice to save me a trip to the emergency room!!!)

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 2140
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Routing Stopped Chamfers
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2014, 01:50 PM »
Use the sliding table on the CMS to make the stopped chamfer. Set the travel stops to control where the cut begins and ends. The miter fence is your push block.

Tom

Offline RobNJ

  • Posts: 26
Re: Routing Stopped Chamfers
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2014, 02:01 PM »
Use the sliding table on the CMS to make the stopped chamfer. Set the travel stops to control where the cut begins and ends. The miter fence is your push block.

Tom

Good point!  Thanks for that.  Yeah, the sliding table w/stops gives pretty amazing control over the piece.
So I guess the combo of the sliding table and the pivot method should give a pretty clean entry point and good repeatability to do the dozen or so spindles 4x each.

Honestly - the CMS has been the one purchase I wasn't positive about after the fact.
Though i think any doubts will be gone pretty soon!!

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 2140
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Routing Stopped Chamfers
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2014, 03:18 PM »
Set up the primary fence, run the spindle along the fence using the miter fence like you would  coping sled. No need for the pivot, you can pivot the piece in using the 2 fences.

Tom

Offline RLJ-Atl

  • Posts: 370
Re: Re: Routing Stopped Chamfers
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2014, 05:35 PM »
See Peter Parfit's video about making his mft cart.  He demonstrates how to cut a stopped chamfer on a router table.  Easy.
TS 75 EQ, MFT/3, CT26, SysRoll, CT Midi, DF 500 Q, CSX, Boom Arm, LR32 set

Offline RobNJ

  • Posts: 26
Re: Routing Stopped Chamfers
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2014, 10:52 AM »
See Peter Parfit's video about making his mft cart.  He demonstrates how to cut a stopped chamfer on a router table.  Easy.

Thanks for that.  Yeah, I see what he's doing at 7:15 in the video "Mobile Bench Project - Design and Main Construction".
It's a great video for a number of reasons - I wish the edit was a little longer in that segment though.  he shows how to route the chamfer, but it doesn't show how he engages the workpiece in the bit.  I'm assuming it's a vertical pivot, where he lowers the piece onto the bit once he has it lined up.


As a little aside that made me smile - my comment on the Domino being cheating got quoted on the Festool Facebook page!  Good news is now I'm famous on facebook.  Bad news is that the Joinery Police will now be coming after me!!!   [big grin]
« Last Edit: June 12, 2014, 11:00 AM by RobNJ »