Author Topic: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??  (Read 26158 times)

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Offline Jesse Cloud

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Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« on: February 15, 2007, 01:05 PM »
Hi all,
Just ordered the OF1400 from uncle Bob and I'm trying to figure out a way to make the tenons for sliding dovetails.  Ideally, I would like to clamp the board vertically to the mft and run the router off the guide rail.  Has anyone done this? 

Is there a better way to do it?  Open to ideas.

Thanks in advance!
Jess

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Offline Jim Dailey

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2007, 01:49 PM »
Hi Jess,

I think it is covered in Jerry Works manual on the MFT.  It's available for download at the Festool USA site.

Hope this helps, jim
Life is just a series of projects...

Offline Jesse Cloud

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2007, 01:52 PM »
Hey Jim,
Jerry's manual is the first place I went.  Unfortunately, near as I can tell, he talks at length on how to cut the female grooves, but doesn't explain how the male parts were cut.

Offline Mirko

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2007, 02:44 PM »
I remember seeing a post on this subject, I had a look around with no luck. Keep trying the "Search" bar. I may be wrong but Jerry Work entered the conversation.

Mirko

Offline Jim Dailey

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2007, 03:49 PM »
Jess sorry about pointing you in the wrong direction....

I also remember Jerry Works posting about sliding dovetails cut with a jig for the MFT.  But it seems like it was back on the Yahoo FOG....   If the info wasn't in his manual, then maybe you can find it with a "search" on the old site.

jim
Life is just a series of projects...

Offline Matthew Schenker

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2007, 04:10 PM »
Quote
I also remember Jerry Works posting about sliding dovetails cut with a jig for the MFT.  But it seems like it was back on the Yahoo FOG....   If the info wasn't in his manual, then maybe you can find it with a "search" on the old site.

We need Jerry Work to move that set of topics into the new forum.

Actually, this reminds me, a lot of people still need to move their discussions into the new forum!

Matthew
FOG Designer and Creator

Offline Corwin

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2007, 04:50 PM »
If I recall correctly, the jig Jerry had for the male portion was a fixture that attached to the side of the MFT to hold the router in a horizontal position.  Please correct me if I am mistaken.  Many woodworking magazines have an ad for this MLCS Horizontal Router Table -- maybe their illustration will give you a better idea of what the jig is...  and maybe give you some ideas of you own.

Good luck -- I'll be attempting this very thing in the near future, so let us know how you do.

Corwin

Offline Ned

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2007, 07:51 PM »
Guys,

The description of Jerry's Horizontal Router Jig for the Festool MFT begins on page 53 of his MFS guide.

Ned

Offline Dave Rudy

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2007, 12:12 AM »
Another possibility is Pat Warner's tenon/sliding dovetail jig.  He demos it in a video on finewoodworking.com for those with a membership.  You can also find a description and picture of it on his website (patwarner.com).

Dave

Offline Dave Ronyak

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2007, 12:59 AM »
It would be simpler if you could use your 1400 router with the same bit set to the same depth for cutting the male portion of the sliding dovetail.  But if you only have a few sliding dovetails to cut and if you don't want to make a horizontal setup based on Jerry Work's manual, consider mounting your router in a simple table or to a router plate, mounting a fence to your table and routing the male dovetail, with your workpiece standing on the edge to be dovetailed.  A fence can be made from a couple of pieces of 3/4 MDF or plywood screwed together at right angles with a couple of triangular braces.  Note that you can mount your 1400 router to a table or insert plate using the two 6mm threaded holes that extend through the baseplate, without need to remove the base plate.  I have a simple router "table" made old cabinet door made of birch veneered plywood; I simply clamp it to the top edge of my workbench when I want to use it.  It could be clamped to the top of the MFT as well.  Adjust the height of the bit above the table to match the depth of your female dovetail groove.  Note that with your fence out of the way, you should be able to use the female cut for setup. But it is best to test the depth of cut using a piece of scrap of the same thickness as the piece on which you plan to cut a male dovetail.  To get a centered male sliding dovetail, position your fence to cut a little from both sides of your workpiece, and adjust your fence to creep up on the final thickness.  Mounting your fence so that one end can rotate about a fixed point and the other can be moved and clamped in place makes for a simple fence that is easily adjusted and calibrations can be marked on your table.  The higher your fence the better to support your workpiece.   Good luck!
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Offline Jesse Cloud

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #10 on: February 16, 2007, 10:56 AM »
Thanks all, and especially Ned for pointing me to the MFS guide.  I was wary of the horizontal router concept until I saw Jerry's idea of burying most of the bit in the fence.  Much safer!!

Offline CharlesWilson

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2007, 11:41 AM »
I ended up doing my male sliding dovetails with an old sheet metal Craftsman router table. Not as nice as the OF1400, but once I set the height and fence, the joints came out fine.

Charles
Charles Wilson

Offline John Stevens

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2007, 11:07 PM »
Ideally, I would like to clamp the board vertically to the mft and run the router off the guide rail.  Has anyone done this?

Hi, Jesse.  Before you pursue that idea, check to see how square the side rails are to the top of your MFT.  I found--surprisingly--that mine weren't square.  I ended up making a "right angle jig" to do what you're proposing.  I've read Jerry Work's instructions for how to make a horizontal router jig for the MFT, but all I can say is that his MFT rails must be a lot more square to the table top than mine.  One of the things I found when refining my right angle jig was that any deviation from square will result in unsightly gaps in your sliding dovetails.  If they're not to be visible, then no big deal, but otherwise....

I had a write-up with pics of my jig on the old site, but I never transferred it over to this one.  I have since dismantled the jig because it was only good for M&T joints and sliding dovetails.  I don't like the sliding dovetail as a joint, and I abandoned M&T joints soon after buying a Lamello biscuit joiner.

Regards,

John
What this world needs is a good retreat.
--Captain Beefheart

Offline AMC

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2007, 06:54 AM »
Ideally, I would like to clamp the board vertically to the mft and run the router off the guide rail.  Has anyone done this? 

Is there a better way to do it?  Open to ideas.

I've used a similar concept, but using the MFS router template. With the MFS clamped to the table, and the workpiece clamped to the side of the MFT, you can guide the router very accurately along an edge as long as the MFS extrusions you use.

I did it to get a quick result on something and made manual adjustments, but as I recall the right-angle pieces that come with the MFS were useful in repeating settings on both sides of the workpiece. Will have to go back and explore this again some day.

Matt

Offline Dave Rudy

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2007, 07:47 PM »
I've used a similar concept, but using the MFS router template. With the MFS clamped to the table, and the workpiece clamped to the side of the MFT, you can guide the router very accurately along an edge as long as the MFS extrusions you use.

I did it to get a quick result on something and made manual adjustments, but as I recall the right-angle pieces that come with the MFS were useful in repeating settings on both sides of the workpiece. Will have to go back and explore this again some day.

Matt

Matt,

I'm having trouble visualizing this.  Could you explain in more detail how you use the MFS in this setup?  Pics would also be helpful.

Thanks

Dave

Offline Dan Lyke

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2007, 09:26 PM »
Dave, I'm not Matt, and I don't know his setup, but one of the things I didn't "get" when I bought my MFS is that it has grooves in the faces, just like the grooves on the edge of the table or the bottom of the guide rail, that the Festool clamps slide into. And the MFS is stiff enough that if you can put something under the MFS, you can use the MFS and a clamp to pull the whole thing really solidly to the table.

The only picture I've got right handy is in a little jig I was using to cut a recess in a whole bunch of identical plywood blanks for stair rail mounts:



What you can't see is that I've got a Quick Clamp FS-HZ 160  up through the table and in one of the slides on the back of that MFS. So I loosen the clamp, slide a block in to the L stops also bolted on the bottom of the MFS, tighten the clamp, and everything's held down really solidly. Like "lift the table up by the end of the MFS" solidly.

So there's no reason you couldn't use another Quick Clamp to tie a piece to the edge of the table, and then cantilever the MFS off the edge of the table using a clamp from the bottom.

When I built what I thought was an MFS knockoff what I didn't get whas that the MFS isn't a flexible template, it can serve as a solid structural element. For my next project I've started a couple times down trying to design a good mortising jig and realizing each time that the MFS does what I want.
Accomplished computer geek, novice woodworker, road cyclist, in Sonoma county, northern California.

Offline Dave Rudy

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2007, 09:49 AM »
Thanks, Dan.  That is most helpful.

I just got the MFS from Bob and am still designing and building my large MFT so havent had the chance to put it to use yet.  I am amazed at the versatility of this part of the system, though, and especially interested in looking at all approaches to sliding dovetails at the moment.

Dave

Offline Dan Lyke

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2007, 10:44 AM »
I'm not sure if these pictures help any more, but I was trying to avoid getting to work, so I figured I'd play with my Festools instead ;D. Here's the MFS 400 clamped so that it extends over the side of the MFT, with a piece of purpleheart clamped to the side of the table as though I were going to route something on the end of it (sliding dovetail, tenon, whatever).

I've got a couple of tenons that I was going to cut this way, and I'm thinking that I'll need a few scrap pieces to get alignment right, both the MFS to the edge of the table, and the piece whose end I'm cutting vertical and set to the copy ring thickness below the MFS, but I think this'll work.
Accomplished computer geek, novice woodworker, road cyclist, in Sonoma county, northern California.

Offline Mirko

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2007, 11:27 AM »
Dan,
Very interesting, but could you post larger pics?

Mirko

Offline Dan Lyke

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2007, 12:24 PM »
Here are some larger pictures. The image quality is pretty lousy, the only thing I was trying to get across is that the MFS is beefy enough to function as an extension of the clamp, not just something you clamp down, and to cantilever out over the edge of the table, and clamping stuff to the side of the table is totally normal.

Something else that I have actually used to make cuts with (rather than just saying I'm going to, as in this setup  ;) ) is to slide the rail supports to the edge of the table and run the router on the rail.
Accomplished computer geek, novice woodworker, road cyclist, in Sonoma county, northern California.

Offline Mirko

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2007, 01:19 PM »
Thanks Dan, I need that now ;)

Mirko

Offline Dave Rudy

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #21 on: March 29, 2007, 02:52 PM »
Dan,

I really want to help you avoid work for as long as possible.  I can see in the second pic (from underneath the table) that the setup leaves room to cut a tenon with the router flat on the mfs rail and the bit projecting below the mfs rails and against the workpiece.  The first pic puzzles me a little, though.  Isnt there a problem with support for the base of the router as you cut down what appears to be 3/4" stock?  Also, in that first pic, what does the mfs gain you as opposed to simply clamping the workpiece vertically on the edge of the table?

Thanks

Dave

Offline Dan Lyke

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2007, 03:23 PM »
I really want to help you avoid work for as long as possible.

I appreciate your dedication to my attempts at anti-productity.

Quote
The first pic puzzles me a little, though.  Isnt there a problem with support for the base of the router as you cut down what appears to be 3/4" stock?

As long as the router's riding on the MFS, it's supported. This is kind of a dummy set-up, that was just the first piece of small stock I pulled out of the closet, if I were trying to cut a real tenon I'd put a spacer in between that stock and the table (so that I wouldn't hit the rail with the router bit), and adjust the MFS so that it made a rectangle that pulled the appropriate amount of stock off all sides of the stock.

Quote
Also, in that first pic, what does the mfs gain you as opposed to simply clamping the workpiece vertically on the edge of the table?

It supports the router, and gives me an edge on all 4 sides to work against (I'd need 4 sides for a tenon, but only 2 for a sliding dovetail). For a sliding dovetail setup I'd set the length far longer than the piece needs to be, set the width to the desired tail width plus the copy ring diameter plus the narrow diameter of the dovetail bit, clamp the stock centered in the resulting rectangle, and set the bit depth to have wherever I measured the narrow diameter at exactly the top of the stock.

Run the router around the rectangle, being careful that it doesn't kick in to the stock, and there's your sliding tail.

Since in that setup centering on the length doesn't matter, just the width, if you use a common spacer then you can clamp the MFS to the table and just change out the pieces in which you want to cut the tails, only worrying about height and angle alignment for them. For that I'd probably take two pieces of 1/4" ply, one smaller than the rectangle, one larger. Glue the smaller one to the larger one, put this on top of the MFS face down, and push the stock up hard against it before clamping so that the top of the stock is parallel to the top of the MFS, but recessed 1/4" to allow for room for the copy ring or guide bushing. Instant height and angle adjustment.

(and if that's not clear, then maybe I need to scrounge an excuse to cut a sliding dovetail so I can take pictures all the way through)
« Last Edit: March 29, 2007, 03:31 PM by Dan Lyke »
Accomplished computer geek, novice woodworker, road cyclist, in Sonoma county, northern California.

Offline Dave Rudy

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2007, 08:51 PM »
Thanks Dan.  This is really helpful.  Of course, routing the dovetail with pics all the way through would really put it over the top, but no pressure.  I think I understand what you are describing.  I just took the earlier pic too literally.  The effect is very similar to Pat Warner's tenonmaking jig (shown below on its side), but the next question is how to make the mfs jig adjustable so that we can "sneak up" on the final tenon width?  With Warner's jig, you use an edge guide on the router to micro-adjust the depth (or width) of cut, cut one side of the tenon or dovetail and then flip the workpiece and re-clamp to cut the other, parallel side.  If you're a FW subscriber, there is a movie showing it at http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/subscription/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id=5276.  It seems like the mfs will do the job just as well, but how to micro-adjust the fit?  More on the jig and additional pics at http://patwarner.com/tenonmaker.html


Dave
« Last Edit: March 29, 2007, 09:42 PM by Dave Rudy »

Offline Dan Lyke

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2007, 10:39 PM »
Yeah, a lot like the Pat Warner jig you show the picture of. I'm not sure what he's using for a fence or a guide, I'm using the copy ring on the bottom of the router.

Adjustability is tough because the MFS is fixed by one of its arms, so while it's easy to adjust the MFS, it'd be hard to adjust both sides of it evenly. But that's what we've got calipers for, get close and sneak up on it with a sanding block. ;)

My sweety is sick right now and last night used phrases like "you're not going to use power tools, are you?", but I've got an adjustable chair frame (we want to be able to quickly prototype seat and back angle and height with a number of different seat and back shapes) in my future, if I can get my taxes under control this weekend I'll try to sneak in some of these techniques and make sure they work as well as I'm claiming...
Accomplished computer geek, novice woodworker, road cyclist, in Sonoma county, northern California.

Offline greg mann

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #25 on: March 30, 2007, 08:20 AM »
It seems like the mfs will do the job just as well, but how to micro-adjust the fit?  More on the jig and additional pics at http://patwarner.com/tenonmaker.html

Dave


Dave,

Is there a reason you couldn't use a fence with the MFS instead of the bushing? Or even in conjunction with the bushing for that matter. By having a bushing in you can assure yourself you won't damage the MFS but you can still sneak up on the size with the fence.
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan

Offline Dave Rudy

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2007, 09:55 AM »

Dave,

Is there a reason you couldn't use a fence with the MFS instead of the bushing? Or even in conjunction with the bushing for that matter. By having a bushing in you can assure yourself you won't damage the MFS but you can still sneak up on the size with the fence.

Greg,

I was wondering that too.  If so, that solves the "micro-adjust" part of the problem.  I think we're at the point where some experimentation is needed.  I'm talking about this instead of doing it because I need to carve out enough time to finish my large MFT before I can even start playing with the MFS.

But to keep the thought process going, there is one more issue -- the workpiece needs to be at exactly 90 degrees to the base of the router (or top of the MFS).  How can we move the workpiece in and out of the "jig" assembly quickly with repeatable positioning at perpendicular?  (This of course is one of the delightful aspects of the Leigh FMT (which I just sold to get the Domino)).

Thanks

Dave

Offline John Stevens

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2007, 10:43 AM »
But to keep the thought process going, there is one more issue -- the workpiece needs to be at exactly 90 degrees to the base of the router (or top of the MFS).

Actually, you may want to make a fence that is capable of being placed at angles other than 90 degrees.  My old jig (and the two prototypes that preceded it) was able to do that by means of an adjustable fence.

  How can we move the workpiece in and out of the "jig" assembly quickly with repeatable positioning at perpendicular?  (This of course is one of the delightful aspects of the Leigh FMT (which I just sold to get the Domino)).

There are a couple of ways of clamping the workpiece if you're not restricting yourself to clamping it to the side-rails of the MFT.  My old jig used a combination of Festool clamps and extruded profiles.  The two prototypes of the final jig used bolts mounted in the clamping faces with star nuts to tighten a clamping bar, and that was a pretty fast and secure way to clamp.

Sorry to mention my jig again, in light of the fact that I didn't think it was worth bringing the pics and text about the jig from the old site to this one.  It's just that I regard the sliding dovetail as a relatively weak joint that is time-consuming to make in comparison to other methods of joinery that are sufficiently strong, so I ended up not using the jig for sliding dovetails.  Its other uses were for splines, M&T joints and floating M&T joints, but the Domino makes it obsolete for those uses.  If anyone's interested, I can dig out some pics of the fences and clamping systems and post them here when I get back home next Thurs.

Regards,

John
What this world needs is a good retreat.
--Captain Beefheart

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2007, 11:06 AM »
Good points John.
On my MFTs the frame is not exactly 90 degrees to the table surface. I have used plastic shim stock from McMaster.com to correct it (the frame splays out a bit) but you could also construct a perpendicular fence that attaches to the bottom of the MFS. This may make it easier to adjust the position of the board relative to the aperture. Doing so makes the MFS rig similar to the Pat Warner jig.

The picture above of the Pat Warner jig shows a large "versatile" aperture (unless I misunderstand it) which requires some kind of fence on top to constrain the router travel. This type of jig would be much more efficient if the aperture was the specific size for the guide bushing (or router base). Maybe the best option is to use the MFS to make a plate with the specific aperture for the tenon required, although this is contrary to Ned's appreciation for the MFS being a multitude of sizes of jigs in one compact form.

Combining both the above paragraphs, you could make the aperture (or MFS configuration) deliberately slightly oversize and use plastic shim stock (with double stick adhesive) to close in on the final size for the perfect tenon.


Offline Dave Rudy

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #29 on: March 30, 2007, 01:47 PM »
Thanks for the contributions, John and Michael.  The Warner jig (and Greg's idea for the MFS) uses an edge guide on the router which allows horizontal position in relation to the workpiece (i.e. lateral depth of cut) to be micro-adjusted.  In this configuration, the MFS rails would be further apart and the setting on the edge guide would move the router bit closer or further from the workpiece. 

Dave

Offline John Stevens

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #30 on: March 30, 2007, 11:16 PM »
Had some time to kill before hitting the road, so I'm trying to post some pics.  I don't have software to resize, so I can only post the ones that are 175kb or smaller in size.  Not many good choices, but here goes:

1. Clamping system using festool extrusions and clamps.  Could have used the rapid-action clamps instead.  Shown clamping a "traditional" tenon at 90 degrees.  The pic only shows one clamp, but you must use two in order to keep the workpiece from moving when cutting the joint.

2. Fence system--two little buttons that can be slid along the extrusion to form lots of angles.  Shown here being set to clamp at 45 degrees.


3. A sliding dovetail cut with this jig.

Unfortunately, I can't post a pic of the prototype jig with the pivoting fence and star-nut clamping system because the file is too big.  But I hope these pics are helpful.

Regards,

John
« Last Edit: March 30, 2007, 11:21 PM by John Stevens »
What this world needs is a good retreat.
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Offline Dave Rudy

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #31 on: March 31, 2007, 09:15 AM »
Thanks John.  Helpful pics.

In the first pic, how do we make sure that the stock is at 90 degrees to the router base (or top of MFT)?

I think we can make the MFS/MFT system work well this way for sliding dovetails.

Dave

Offline AMC

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #32 on: April 01, 2007, 05:54 AM »
Matt,

I'm having trouble visualizing this.  Could you explain in more detail how you use the MFS in this setup?  Pics would also be helpful.

Dave - sorry about the delay in responding. Dan's using the same concept, and I can't really improve on his pics. But now I'm back in range of communications, I'm following the discussion with interest. The flaw with the setup I used, and which Dan posted, is in getting accurate, repeatable, incremental adjustments. I'd like to find a solution to this, because it's otherwise a quick and easy way of routing tenons. I have to make a couple of windows over Easter, so it will be an opportunity to tinker with tenon technique.

Matt

Offline John Stevens

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Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #33 on: April 05, 2007, 12:50 PM »
In the first pic, how do we make sure that the stock is at 90 degrees to the router base (or top of MFT)?

Hi, Dave.  Sorry for the delayed reply, but I just got back in town.  I hope these pics answer your questions.  The first two are from the same jig pictured above.  The fence is set with a square, and the "face" is fixed at 90 degrees to the top with corner braces.  The corner braces are cut at exactly 90 degrees on the MFT, with the fence set on the MFT using the method Rick Christopherson teaches here:

http://home.att.net/~waterfront-woods/Articles/Double-Error-Squaring.html

The second two pics show a different fence and clamping system from a prototype of the other jig.  The fence pivots.  The clamps are just oak sticks backed with a high-friction polymer material (carpet underlayment from Home Depot, but the high friction tape from Lee Valley would work as well).

The last pic is of my late dog playing in the bushes.  Sorry, it's appropos of nothing, but it was on the same CD as the jig pics, so I couldn't help myself.
What this world needs is a good retreat.
--Captain Beefheart

Offline Jim Dailey

  • Posts: 278
Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #34 on: April 05, 2007, 01:04 PM »
John,

Very creative......

Very refined use of Clamping Profiles !!!

Nice "out of the box thinking..."

jim
Life is just a series of projects...

Offline Jesse Cloud

  • Posts: 1731
  • Festooling at the end of a dirt road in New Mexico
Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #35 on: April 05, 2007, 07:23 PM »
Great thread.

I built the jig from Jerry Work's MFS manual and it works great. 

This forum really adds a lot of value to the tools.  I just got my domino and I'll bet in a few weeks there will be dozens of creative new uses for it on this board. I can hardly wait!

Offline Dave Rudy

  • Posts: 771
  • Coloroda Front Range, in the lee of Pikes Peak
Re: Sliding dovetails with the MFT and OF1400??
« Reply #36 on: April 05, 2007, 07:40 PM »
John,

Thanks for taking the time to post those pics.  Excellent work, as always!!   It is amazingly helpful when creative people are willing to share their ideas and help solve common problems.

Sorry about your dog.  I know how attached I am to my four-legged friend.  I know that one of us will be in for something of a rough time when the other one departs.

Dave