Author Topic: Using a router with a rail.  (Read 14247 times)

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Offline HarveyWildes

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Using a router with a rail.
« on: January 20, 2017, 11:43 AM »
I have a 2200 router and will have a 1400 in a couple of hours.  I will be using them freehand, not in a router table.

One of the uses I foresee is using them to route dados and rabbets in plywood panels for shop cabinets and fixtures.  I'm primarily looking to take advantage of the dust collection when routing freehand, but being able to easily set up the routers for use with my tracks would be a great additional feature.

When using track saws with tracks, you just set up the track on the line and cut.  How do you set up a router to use a track to cut  straight line?  Do you shoot for the same technique - set up the router to cut just on the zero clearance strip of the track?  If so, how do you get it spot-on aligned with the strip?  If you don't use that technique, how do you set it up?

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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2017, 11:58 AM »
Using the router you will align the center marks built into the bases for your alignment to cut line.

Offline HarveyWildes

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2017, 12:01 PM »
Using the router you will align the center marks built into the bases for your alignment to cut line.

Is there a manual or other Festool document that describes the process in more detail?

Offline charley1968

  • Posts: 491
Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2017, 12:28 PM »
You can use the edge guide on a rail. And there are supplemental manuals for the routers. It's not difficult to set up the router for the rail. Good luck!
Just for today..

Offline charley1968

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2017, 12:31 PM »
Google's your friend: try Festool OF 1400 supplemental manual.
Just for today..

Offline Corwin

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2017, 12:42 PM »
Google's your friend: try Festool OF 1400 supplemental manual.

Charley's correct. Rick's supplemental manuals can be found here: http://www.waterfront-woods.com/festool/

Scroll down to the manual for the OF1400. On that manual, look on pages 19 and 20.
Looks like your rabbit joint is a hare off! ;)

Offline charley1968

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2017, 01:05 PM »
But i was writing bullshit about the edge guide..
Just for today..

Offline Corwin

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2017, 01:10 PM »
But i was writing bullshit about the edge guide..

Oops, I meant finding the supplemental manuals was correct. Using the edge guide in conjunction with the guide rail -- once again, you are correct as this would be BS.  [wink] [big grin]
Looks like your rabbit joint is a hare off! ;)

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 490
Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2017, 02:30 PM »
Although I may be the minority, I found that using the rail, rods, and the foot on my OF2000 router allowed it some movement leaving a not so perfect cut. Instead I like using the rails and their clamping abilities, so I flip the rails around and push the base against the rail. This runs smooth with no variations. Much of it came from the plastic track guide, and the rest of the movement came from the little foot deal. Are others finding the same thing?

This little foot could probably be replaced with a larger more stable one? Still wouldn't address the movement in the plastic guide rail attachment.


When pushing against the rail I also run a plate (Think router table plate) on the bottom of my router. This makes it easy to measure the distance from bit to edge, or center of router to edge, and provides a stable edge to run up against the guide rail. I honestly can't remember the last time I removed the plate, but I often use the router in a table setup.

Others experiences probably differ from mine...

Offline Ocram

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2017, 02:50 PM »
@Peter C the little extendible foot on the router is on the small side can't help with that. The plastic guide plate on the raail that hold the rods is adjustable om the OF1010 and 1400. Dont have the 2200 but there should be something similar I think. The two screws on the bottom can be adjusted to the rail and eliminate sideward movement. Maybe this will help.


Offline DrD

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2017, 03:09 PM »
I have used both the OF1010 and the OF1400 to plow dados with the guide rails.  For the OF1400 the Guide Stop 492 601 precisely positions your router bit.  There are several YouTube tutorials showing how to use the router with the guide rail to cut rabbits and dados.

As noted by Peter C above the foot can be used to level the router if you position some of the router base on the guide rail.   You can move the base completely off the rail again using the Guide Stop, then use the Small Bore Accessory router base 492 574 added to the OF1400 to again level the router by compensating for the thickness of the Guide Rail.

I find using the router with the guide rail & CT dust extraction far superior to setting up a dado stack on my cabinet saw.

Hope this helps.  DrD
Dr.D

Offline Peter_C

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2017, 03:58 PM »
The plastic guide plate on the raail that hold the rods is adjustable om the OF1010 and 1400. Dont have the 2200 but there should be something similar I think. The two screws on the bottom can be adjusted to the rail and eliminate sideward movement. Maybe this will help.
The theory of adjustment is sound, and I did tighten mine up before ever using it, still there is enough leverage when pushing a heavy router, with a dado sized bit, to cause irregularities. The further the router is moved away from the rail IE: off the rail, the more leverage that can be applied. I recently bought an OF1010 and will try it with the guide rail at some point. The LR32 type connection may well be superior, but I have not purchased a kit yet.

There is zero movement when the bit pulls the router towards the rail using a plate as I do now. When edging direction is not so important as you can make a couple of passes. Been using boards clamped up as guides and a router for cutting dados long before I ever knew Festool existed. *shrugs*

Offline Acrobat

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2017, 08:32 PM »
Set your router on the rail and using the rods slide the router away from the rail and it's strip by a good inch or more say, and use the centreline marked on the routers base to position where you wish the centre of the router bit to cut. Ensure the router bit is not cutting into the rail, so just slide it further away and set the cut line accordingly.
If you have the micro adjust additional piece that fits onto the rods/rail  you can easily dial it exact to your rabbet/dado line.
There is a good video on you tube showing a setup......
Don't wake me, I'm livin' the dream!

Offline joiner1970

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2017, 03:41 AM »
I tried using my 2200 awhile back to trim a chipboard worktop end, using the rail attachment and special base. I found there was a lot of wobble, due to the weight of the 2200 hanging over the edge. I gave up in the end & did it another way.

Has anyone else noticed this ?

Also my guide bushes are a loose fit, when fitted you can wiggle them around a tenth of a millimetre side to side. There's no play in my 1400 ones.

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Offline joiner1970

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2017, 02:30 PM »
I tried using my 2200 awhile back to trim a chipboard worktop end, using the rail attachment and special base. I found there was a lot of wobble, due to the weight of the 2200 hanging over the edge. I gave up in the end & did it another way.

Has anyone else noticed this ?

Also my guide bushes are a loose fit, when fitted you can wiggle them around a tenth of a millimetre side to side. There's no play in my 1400 ones.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk

Anyone ??

Offline Holmz

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2017, 04:33 PM »
It sounds easy and like "a system" no matter which manufacturer has the goodies.

In my experience getting the dado slight off and in the wrong spot is easy, and setup is time consuming.


How did you do it in the end?

Offline ear3

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2017, 05:22 PM »
@joiner1970

When I do edge work on the 2200, I usually use the the edge guide.  One other advantage (which I also do on the 1400) is that you can actually use the rail attachment as a stabilizer when it's attached to the rods with the normal base and the edge guide (left hand on rail attachment, right hand on edge guide knob)  Is there a reason why you went rail on this?

Will have to check the fit of my guide bushing inserts -- i don't recall any play.

I tried using my 2200 awhile back to trim a chipboard worktop end, using the rail attachment and special base. I found there was a lot of wobble, due to the weight of the 2200 hanging over the edge. I gave up in the end & did it another way.

Has anyone else noticed this ?

Also my guide bushes are a loose fit, when fitted you can wiggle them around a tenth of a millimetre side to side. There's no play in my 1400 ones.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk

Anyone ??
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Offline Peter_C

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2017, 05:40 PM »
When I do edge work on the 2200, I usually use the the edge guide. 
Except it won't work when you are edging the entire piece not doing a round over. IE: Solid surface after glue up, to true it up, and cut the overlap off.

Offline joiner1970

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2017, 06:07 PM »
@joiner1970

When I do edge work on the 2200, I usually use the the edge guide.  One other advantage (which I also do on the 1400) is that you can actually use the rail attachment as a stabilizer when it's attached to the rods with the normal base and the edge guide (left hand on rail attachment, right hand on edge guide knob)  Is there a reason why you went rail on this?

Will have to check the fit of my guide bushing inserts -- i don't recall any play.

I tried using my 2200 awhile back to trim a chipboard worktop end, using the rail attachment and special base. I found there was a lot of wobble, due to the weight of the 2200 hanging over the edge. I gave up in the end & did it another way.

Has anyone else noticed this ?

Also my guide bushes are a loose fit, when fitted you can wiggle them around a tenth of a millimetre side to side. There's no play in my 1400 ones.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk

Anyone ??
As Peter says above.

I'm not edging I'm trimming a straight edge onto a worktop end. Using the rail , but I've found with the router over the edge and no support that side it wobbles. Not easy to cut a clean square edge.

Also the thing about the guide bushes, has anyone else got a loose fitting one ?
I noticed it when I got the 2200 last year and I might have asked before on here. At the time I just stuck paper around it to wedge it in place. Since then I've looked at my of 1400 and there's no play whatsoever on that one.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk


Offline geoffshep

  • Posts: 153
Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #19 on: January 27, 2017, 07:06 AM »
As noted by Peter C above the foot can be used to level the router if you position some of the router base on the guide rail.   You can move the base completely off the rail again using the Guide Stop, then use the Small Bore Accessory router base 492 574 added to the OF1400 to again level the router by compensating for the thickness of the Guide Rail.

DrD, I am also looking to use the router off the rail as I have found the plastic foot can mark the workpiece.  Can you confirm that base part is the correct thickness - if so it is considerably cheaper than the other base which I know is the right size - 493233. 

PS: Initially, it looked too thin, but looking at it more closely I guess your part clips on and adds thickness, whereas mine is a replacement base?


« Last Edit: January 27, 2017, 07:30 AM by geoffshep »

Offline DrD

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2017, 09:17 AM »
@geoffshep

Good Morning!  As another poster on FOG frequently says, your mileage may vary.  You are correct in my system, I do not remove the existing router base, and the router, with the added small bore base, sits flat on the material being routed, giving me excellent dados and rabbits.  I got this idea from a YouTube video showing the op using his OF1400 and FS rail to route rabbits and dados.  All this presupposes that you are using Guide Stop.

Hope this helps.

Don
Dr.D

Offline Distinctive Interiors

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2017, 10:51 AM »
@joiner1970

When I do edge work on the 2200, I usually use the the edge guide.  One other advantage (which I also do on the 1400) is that you can actually use the rail attachment as a stabilizer when it's attached to the rods with the normal base and the edge guide (left hand on rail attachment, right hand on edge guide knob)  Is there a reason why you went rail on this?

Will have to check the fit of my guide bushing inserts -- i don't recall any play.

I tried using my 2200 awhile back to trim a chipboard worktop end, using the rail attachment and special base. I found there was a lot of wobble, due to the weight of the 2200 hanging over the edge. I gave up in the end & did it another way.

Has anyone else noticed this ?

Also my guide bushes are a loose fit, when fitted you can wiggle them around a tenth of a millimetre side to side. There's no play in my 1400 ones.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk

Anyone ??
As Peter says above.

I'm not edging I'm trimming a straight edge onto a worktop end. Using the rail , but I've found with the router over the edge and no support that side it wobbles. Not easy to cut a clean square edge.

Also the thing about the guide bushes, has anyone else got a loose fitting one ?
I noticed it when I got the 2200 last year and I might have asked before on here. At the time I just stuck paper around it to wedge it in place. Since then I've looked at my of 1400 and there's no play whatsoever on that one.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk

Hi Chippy,

I just had a look at my OF2200 and my OF1400 and there is a small amount of play in the guide bushes on the OF2200. I have the OF2200 Accessory Set, so I checked all the various size guide bushes and they all have the same amount of play.

The way the guide bush fits to the OF1400 is slightly different as it locks in place with sprung clips, whereas the OF2200 guide bush is just held in place on 4 locating pegs when the clip-on base runner is re-attached.

Having said that, I have'nt noticed any issues with inaccurate cuts when I've been using the Of2200, but I will double check the next time I use it in a couple of weeks time.

Offline joiner1970

  • Posts: 3206
Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2017, 12:41 PM »
@joiner1970

When I do edge work on the 2200, I usually use the the edge guide.  One other advantage (which I also do on the 1400) is that you can actually use the rail attachment as a stabilizer when it's attached to the rods with the normal base and the edge guide (left hand on rail attachment, right hand on edge guide knob)  Is there a reason why you went rail on this?

Will have to check the fit of my guide bushing inserts -- i don't recall any play.

I tried using my 2200 awhile back to trim a chipboard worktop end, using the rail attachment and special base. I found there was a lot of wobble, due to the weight of the 2200 hanging over the edge. I gave up in the end & did it another way.

Has anyone else noticed this ?

Also my guide bushes are a loose fit, when fitted you can wiggle them around a tenth of a millimetre side to side. There's no play in my 1400 ones.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk

Anyone ??
As Peter says above.

I'm not edging I'm trimming a straight edge onto a worktop end. Using the rail , but I've found with the router over the edge and no support that side it wobbles. Not easy to cut a clean square edge.

Also the thing about the guide bushes, has anyone else got a loose fitting one ?
I noticed it when I got the 2200 last year and I might have asked before on here. At the time I just stuck paper around it to wedge it in place. Since then I've looked at my of 1400 and there's no play whatsoever on that one.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk

Hi Chippy,

I just had a look at my OF2200 and my OF1400 and there is a small amount of play in the guide bushes on the OF2200. I have the OF2200 Accessory Set, so I checked all the various size guide bushes and they all have the same amount of play.

The way the guide bush fits to the OF1400 is slightly different as it locks in place with sprung clips, whereas the OF2200 guide bush is just held in place on 4 locating pegs when the clip-on base runner is re-attached.

Having said that, I have'nt noticed any issues with inaccurate cuts when I've been using the Of2200, but I will double check the next time I use it in a couple of weeks time.
Cheers mate that puts my mind at rest.

The 2200 has little magnets too to hold it in place. At first I was shimming it with paper but I don't bother now. I'm the same as you I've not noticed any problems with joints on worktops or anything else involving the guide bush.



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Offline Dovetail65

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2017, 12:51 PM »
The OF2200 can become inaccurate for cuts needing super accuracy and precision with if relying on the two rods solely for support.

The OF2200 needs a 4 point contact upgrade for the 2 rod locking method. I think anyone that uses the OF2200 everyday with the rods and circle jigs etc,  probably knows what I mean. There will be a degree of flex right at the rods because the rods are only held at two points to the base. This effects use on the rail or using jigs. It isn't enough to mess up a dados, but things that need more accuracy it can and does.

This does nag at me because my work is 80% matched radii, so I need to dial in at about .03" to get a perfect match. .03" error can be seen  by simply putting the wrong pressure on the router with the rod as they are stock. I really had to beef up my circle jig right at the point of the base of the router to compensate and still have to be very careful how I move the router. I would not have to do this if the router held the rods more firmly to the base.

I am hoping the OF 2200 next version has this fix along with a huge LED ring.

The OF2200 is still my best router and the best I have used, but it can be better. It is the only Festool router I suggest buying.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2017, 12:57 PM by Dovetail65 »
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 490
Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2017, 02:04 PM »
As Peter says above.

I'm not edging I'm trimming a straight edge onto a worktop end. Using the rail , but I've found with the router over the edge and no support that side it wobbles. Not easy to cut a clean square edge.
What works great for me is to use the high side of the rail against my router base. Since the router base is to small I use a base I made out of aluminum, but wished now I had made it out of a phenolic sheet. Time spent making it wasn't much, so I may remake one. A table router base plate would work too, but my OF2000 doesn't have anything readily available, and the aluminum piece was $5.00. I also like having the router offset 1/16" so it is easy to flip the router in the table without adjusting the rail to change measurements. I have markings on the backside of the router plate for center measurements, etc. I have not removed the plate since it was installed. I have other routers for when clearance is an issue.

Another option if the work piece isn't too big and your router table is big enough is to just use a router table. One sheet of well supported melamine with a router table cut out and I can feed 4ft wide pieces thru it. Again using my Festool track as the guide rail, with the work against the high side of it. Just make sure the bit is pushing the work against the rail. Go the wrong direction and OH MY! Please video and share if you do screw up ;)

I made the dimensions of the base so it would all fit into a Sys4.

Offline Steven Mark

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2018, 04:25 PM »
First time posting, but this removes the wiggle. And makes it dead on.

Offline grobkuschelig

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #26 on: January 13, 2018, 05:44 PM »
First time posting, but this removes the wiggle. And makes it dead on.

Nice!

Do you do anything special to quickly set the rails parallel? Or just put them down with a block between...?

Offline Steven Mark

  • Posts: 2
Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #27 on: January 13, 2018, 06:51 PM »
I have 2 MFT/3 so I use the extra swivel and stop but it would be just as easy to use clamps. Once there set your good to go, but yeah block anything to keep it parallel.

Offline jobsworth

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #28 on: January 13, 2018, 07:27 PM »
I tried using my 2200 awhile back to trim a chipboard worktop end, using the rail attachment and special base. I found there was a lot of wobble, due to the weight of the 2200 hanging over the edge. I gave up in the end & did it another way.

Has anyone else noticed this ?

Also my guide bushes are a loose fit, when fitted you can wiggle them around a tenth of a millimetre side to side. There's no play in my 1400 ones.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk

Anyone ??

Hey Chris,

Though I dont keep my 2200 in my CMS ,When I do hand route with it  I havent had that problem
Loving the Calif sun....

Offline jobsworth

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Re: Using a router with a rail.
« Reply #29 on: January 23, 2018, 01:29 PM »
@jointer1970

Hey Chris,

I just used my 1010 with the rail to route a 6mm groove in 13mm ply for drawer bottoms in a 8ft long piece of ply. After ripping the ply with my PGs I set the ply under the rail and used other peices of ply for support ( I cut 3 pieces 5.5 inches wide 8 ft long.)  I had to use the other 2 pieces of ply under the rail for support and clamped one of the support pieces to prevent movement. I adj the screws on the rail attachment to prevent slop during routing.

Now if I were to have used my 2200, the only thing I would have done different is use the base which is made to help the 2200 to be used with a rail. Its off set looks like it has a small step which is about the thickness of the rail, to prevent any wobble. The step part rides on the piece to be routed. In this case it would of been the ply.

Hope this helps. Oh I dont know if they make one for the 1400, I wouldnt think so but I really dont know. 
Loving the Calif sun....