Author Topic: Connecting two rails in parallel for making dados  (Read 1842 times)

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Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3822
Re: Connecting two rails in parallel for making dados
« Reply #30 on: March 01, 2019, 09:58 AM »
Ill put in a vote of confidence on micro fence too. Works so well I really don’t know what I’d do without it. Even use it to cut mortise and tenon joints. The owner/inventor/maker/showman Rich is a great to work with and makes really smart tools.

https://microfence.com/product/interface-essentials-package-straight-line-only/

Sean

The Micro-Fence is truly micro adjustable with zero lash. The Festool piece is pretty good but always has some +/- error.

What I don't get is how it's better than the less costly Festool FS-OF (apart from the fact that FS-OF seems incompatible with 1010)?

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Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 350
Re: Connecting two rails in parallel for making dados
« Reply #31 on: March 01, 2019, 10:22 AM »
@koze I think you could skip the Micro fence altogether and use the Kerfmaker. In the attached picture I used a stop collar to set two distances for moving the router left/right to make a dado in two passes. The dado was so tight that the adjoined pieces had to be tapped apart. Alternatively I could've made the joint a little less tight by not pushing hard on the Kerfmaker when setting it up.

The nice thing with this setup is you could use the Kerfmaker between a stop on the fence and the material and not move the router at all. Set it up for the first pass, flip it over against the fence stop, move the board and run the second pass. I did this as well and it came out the same. At no point during this process did I have to take any measurements. The video on its uses was posted above in my previous post.

I bought mine from Canada to the US and it was around $60 shipped.

https://www.northwestpassagetools.com/collections/bridge-city-tool-works/products/km-1-kerfmaker
« Last Edit: March 01, 2019, 10:24 AM by DynaGlide »
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