Author Topic: Domino Friction Pads?  (Read 1427 times)

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Offline darita

  • Posts: 292
Domino Friction Pads?
« on: July 16, 2018, 12:41 PM »
It's been a while since I saw these, but I'm looking for the sandpaper-type friction pads that stick on the work surface of the Domino.  These are the things that help hold the Domino's position while in operation.  Thanks for the help.

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Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 977
Re: Domino Friction Pads?
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2018, 02:46 PM »
I wouldn't want sandpaper style pads, it would mess up the surface that I most likely want to glue up soonafter.

What's your problem with keeping the domino (and which one) in place for the plunge?

I havn't had any after I realized that I need to hold the 700 exclusively at the handle at the fence when using that to register, should I use the base (with fence retracted) I found that to clamp a reference corner (if possible, else at least an edge) for the machine to be held against is the best plan to keep it from moving while plunging.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2336
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Domino Friction Pads?
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2018, 03:00 PM »
I would not use sandpaper on my Dominos for the reason mentioned above. The only times I’ve had movement of either of my Dominos (700 and 500) is when I’ve not held the machine correctly and I’ve done thousands of mortises with them.

However, if you must, Lie Nielsen sells rolls of adhesive backed sandpaper of assorted grits that would be an option.
Birdhunter

Offline darita

  • Posts: 292
Re: Domino Friction Pads?
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2018, 09:38 AM »
Not a must, as I can keep the machine in place to do the plunge, however I thought it might be good for extra assurance and grip.  I've used it on the fence of my miter saw and it works well.

Offline James Biddle

  • Posts: 136
Re: Domino Friction Pads?
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2018, 10:40 AM »
Wouldn't applying a sandpaper 'grip' to the face of the fence affect the depth of cut?

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3634
Re: Domino Friction Pads?
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2018, 11:29 AM »
Not a must, as I can keep the machine in place to do the plunge, however I thought it might be good for extra assurance and grip.  I've used it on the fence of my miter saw and it works well.

I get the sense that you've experienced the DF 500 shifting as you plunge it.  If so, slow down your rate of plunge so that the audible motor sounds barely change as you make the plunge.  You will not experience any shifting right or left if you use this technique.   [smile]
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4944
Re: Domino Friction Pads?
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2018, 01:07 PM »
As Sparky says, it's very important to first engage the cutter with the wood slowly. If you initially plunge too fast, the cutter will grab the wood and move the DF 500.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2336
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Domino Friction Pads?
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2018, 01:13 PM »
The movement, as said above, might be a technique effect and might actually be avoiding a broken cutter.

A slow cutter engagement is the best technique.
Birdhunter