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Offline Rick Christopherson

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Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« on: December 19, 2011, 01:34 AM »
Shane, the following content is sketchy, so feel free to move it to another forum. To me, it seemed like it fit here best, but I could be wrong about that.

This weekend I was working on a project of making a pair of granite side tables with my 10-year old son. <Oops, brainfart. My daughter is 10. My son is almost 13. He would kill me for this.> I'm making one for me, and he is making one for his mom (Christmas). The tops are 1-1/8" solid granite, framed with cherry to conceal the unpolished granite edges. The inside profile of the frame is complex because it has to wrap the top corner of the granite plus have a rabbet for a substrate below the granite. Here is a picture of the frame profile. The small lip conceals the unpolished granite corner, and the rabbet supports the plywood substrate that connects the base with the top.



Even though Domino is not designed for it, whenever I make mortises, I always try to register the position from the finished faces. In this case, I don't have any choice, because the inside surface is not flat. So I needed to rig up my Domino to register from the outside "point" of the mitered frame instead of the normal inside corner.

To do this, I took one of my older Domino Support Brackets (495666) and bolted it to the underside of the Domino fence, using the triangular alignment holes for mounting. I came up with this idea 5 years ago, but didn't implement it until recently. It gives accurate positioning from the "point" (outside corner) of a mitered frame.

To do this, I removed the two thumbscrews from the support bracket and drilled a couple new holes through it that align with the triangular alignment holes in the Domino Fence. Note, I did not modify my Domino to do this! Only the Support Bracket. In effect, this creates a new fence that is 90-degrees to the standard Domino fence.



The drawback is that in this configuration, the Domino sight gauge is too far away from the workpiece to be usable. Also, the lines on the base of my Domino are not accurate. Only the sight gauge is perfectly centered about the mortise position at the level of accuracy I demand of my joints.

I couldn't use pencil lines with the sight gauge, so I needed an external reference edge. Then I realized that the SCG-10 is perfect for this. It will register the sideways position of the tenon from the finished edge of my frame. Moreover, these tenons are not centered on the workpiece. They are offset, closer to the top edge due to the rabbet for the substrate.

Because my son's piece of granite was different from mine, the frames are slightly different too. Notice how the tenons are equal distance from the "points" but not the "blunts" of the miter. Also notice how they are centered about the space for the granite, not across the whole width of the frame.



Here is the final result of the mortising operation. The Support Bracket is registered off the outside face of the frame, and the SCG-10 stop arm is registered off the top edge of the frame. Everything is locked in so tight that the tenon alignment was perfect. The mitered corners were so close to perfect that it took only a couple passes with the ROS sander to flush all of the edges.



The tables aren't finished yet, but if you are curious, here is my table with the granite in place, and my son's base-legs without his granite (he was still sanding the decorative flutes). They are both now ready for lacquer and final assembly. Hopefully I can get that done in the next couple of days.

« Last Edit: December 19, 2011, 05:59 PM by Rick Christopherson »

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Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2011, 03:27 AM »
I suppose as long as I have this thread open, I should show some of the other things we did while making these tables. As a matter of fact, I should probably explain the whole back-story for them too.

Without going into the reason, I have literally TONS of granite pieces in my garage. I got it for free and planned on doing projects just like this one with each of the pieces. The picture below shows some of the granite I have stacked up in the garage.



I haven't been very active in my workshop for a long time, but a couple weeks ago I decided to take advantage of some of this granite and make a front hall table for myself. I found a piece and created a design around it. The next day, I got a call from my son wanting to "make" something for his mom for Christmas. So I figured we could kill two birds with one stone and make similar tables together.

I created the design in SolidWorks and configured one version for his chosen piece of granite and one for my chosen piece. I printed a template for the legs and we bandsawed the rough form and then template routed them with the OF1400 with a top-bearing pattern bit.

After some edge sanding, we put a 2mm (Festool) roundover profile around the edges of the legs. This picture is of Tanner routing the profile of his table legs using the MFK 700 router. (Yes, you may notice the ASA5000 boomarm over Tanner's head. I love that thing, and it is the best Festool product I ever extorted out of poor Christian Oltzscher.  [tongue] It sweeps across my entire shop.)



The legs and center shelf/stretcher were assembled and then we moved on to the top frame and granite.

I spent more time "thinking" about how to assemble the granite and cherry frame than we spent doing the actual assembly. I planned out how to deal with the granite probably being out-of-square, how to deal with the granite be of non-precise thickness, and how to make these two dissimilar materials fit together permanently and with precision. That's why the frame was built the way it was built.

I used construction adhesive between the granite and the cherry, but regular wood glue and Dominos to assemble the cherry frame. I know how much squeeze out is preferred with wood glue, but the construction adhesive was sheer guess due to the large gap. During clamping, the granite needed to be supported from below so that the cherry frame and clamps would settle down to the surface by their own weight. I screwed this up the first time on MY frame, but at least learned my lessons by the time we did Tanner's frame.


After the frames were dry we needed to route the flutes along the edges. To make the single round bead, I needed to use my sharp-point flute bit spaced 3/8" apart. (Picture a roundover bit without a bearing and a sharp point at the center). Tanner used the MFK 700 with the fence to control the spacing of these passes. Important: Read one of my manuals on this topic. If you move the router in the wrong direction, it will pull away from the fence! I know this fact VERY WELL, but it still slipped my mind. Thankfully I screwed-up on my test piece and pulled the router in the wrong direction when it didn't matter. (The router bit drifted away from the fence).

In the picture below, notice that Tanner is pulling the router toward him. If he had pushed the router in the opposite direction, it would have caused the router bit to pull the router away from the fence (registration edge) and the line would be crooked.



Of course the worst part of any project is the sanding. We use pneumatic ROS sanders for the grunt work, but the fine sanding of the flutes must be done by hand. Tanner was introduced to the pains of hand sanding. This is his top, which you can see is more square than my rectangular top.




Offline MarkF

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2011, 09:35 AM »
Impressive!
I hope your son was just posing for the photos...he needs some Eye protection if not. [eek]

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2011, 01:01 PM »
I am more than just a little offended that you would imply I would endanger my son's safety needlessly. Please explain how a router bit in the fully enclosed base of the MFK700 poses any immediate danger. I know it makes you feel important to point out perceived safety violations in pictures, but there is a whole Tommy Silva thread for that. Knowing when safety is a concern is just as important as knowing how to protect yourself from it. If the operation was dangerous enough to warrant safety glasses, he wouldn't have been performing it in the first place. I don't make my son wear a bicycle helmet either, but he does wear full protection on the dirt bike.

Offline Festoolfootstool

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2011, 01:24 PM »
Impressive!
I hope your son was just posing for the photos...he needs some Eye protection if not. [eek]

You can clearly see the machine's switch is in the off position...
If the milk turns out to be sour, I ain't the kind of **** to drink it.......

Why do Festool accessories only have a two month guarantee here in the UK ?

Online fritter63

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2011, 01:45 PM »
Great idea Rick.

Related: When I bought my first biscuit jointer, I researched what was available and got the DeWalt.

A month later, Porter Cable came out with theirs with a killer feature that immediately made them the best and prompted me to buy
the PC as well. The feature was a fence that tilted in same way you've modified that one to do.

So the biscuit jointers have seen the need for this, maybe Festool can offer something like this in the future.

Offline Deansocial

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2011, 01:51 PM »
Impressive!
I hope your son was just posing for the photos...he needs some Eye protection if not. [eek]

You can clearly see the machine's switch is in the off position...

but can you see if the sandpaper is turned off or not?

Offline kfitzsimons

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2011, 08:15 PM »
As for not wearing a bike helmet, my daughter is a physical therapist who works with young people. She and her co-workers have a saying: Wear a helmet or end up wearing a diaper. Just saying. Great project with your son though.

Offline Bill Hendrix

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2011, 11:34 PM »
Looks like you have a great relationship with your son, Rick.  It reminds me of the times my son and I get to work together.  He's now 30, but still comes to dad's shop to work with the Festools and we ride motorcycles together.  Once a year Ryan and I will take off for a week riding in the mountains of Colorado.  Great times!!

Rick, could you give us a little tour of your shop area?  Of specific interest to me is the ASA5000 and what you store in all those little sortainer drawers and how you remember what's in each drawer.

Thanks!!
« Last Edit: December 19, 2011, 11:35 PM by Bill Hendrix »

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2011, 01:25 AM »
Bill, I got the ASA5000 this spring. Here is a thread on the FOG that discusses it a little bit: http://festoolownersgroup.com/fun-games-diversions/something-wicked-this-way-comes/?all. Halfway down the thread is a link to the parallel discussion about it on the TalkFestool forum.

It's not available in North America, nor is there a lot of demand for it, even though it is super cool. It took a lot of engineering to safely mount that to my basement wall. The basement wall is 12 inch reinforced concrete that supports the spancrete garage floor above half of my shop. Any other type of wall wouldn't survive the torsional forces.

On the end of the boom arm I have compressed air, vacuum, 2 outlets of unswitched power, and 2 outlets of CT22 switched power. I also have the vac hose with integrated plug-it cord on the end too. The articulated arm has a 16 foot radius so it reaches most areas of interest in my shop. It will even reach about 10 feet into the machine room under the garage. The really cool thing is that I no longer have to reposition the vac for long rips with the TS55.

As for the sortainers, I am still in the middle of organizing them (one of them is upstairs here in my office for holding parts to build my MGS and SCG Guides for the Domino.) I am organizing them with cabinet wood screws to the left, and progressing through machine screws then general hardware toward the right.

The Sortainers come with paper labels and plastic sheaths, but I am printing labels on the computer so they are easier to read at a glance. The high-volume screws occupy whole drawers, but the sortainers also have dividers for segregating lower volumes. Most of my wood screws are in bulk and take up whole drawers.

I am still very slowly reorganizing my workshop after laying down the new floor a couple years ago. The first step in finally getting myself interested in the workshop again was to set up what I have nicknamed my "Wall of Shame" last year. This is my Festool display area, which also makes a great backdrop for photos and videos. 



After 4-1/2 years, I am finally mounting my Kapex into the cutoff station in the machine room. The original station was 29 feet long and permanently fixed in place. I tore this all apart except for the last 12 feet of the Radial Arm saw surface. The Kapex is mounted on a separate platform and I will rebuild an extension for it to the left. This time, these two sections will be movable to make it easier to access the dust collector that is behind them in a nook in the wall. All of the surfaces are steel-blue colored laminate.

Another new change to the shop as a result of the new floor is that many of the machines are now on machine movers from Vega. These are the type where the whole frame rests on the floor when not being moved, and the wheels don't touch the floor unless you tilt the frame with a separate tiller wheel. They even made me a custom one for my 7-foot Oliver lathe. This allows me to keep the machines tight to the wall for most operations, but pull them out when it becomes necessary.

Offline woodwreck

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2011, 08:49 AM »
I possess the original attachment you have marketed under the Domino with steel plate fingers but have never seen the version you use - e.g. the green aluminum fingers and apparently some form of drive belt adjustment. Additional information on the 'green machine' would be appreciated.

TIA
Regards,

Woodwreck

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2011, 10:05 AM »
I am sure that Rick will be back to answer questions, but in the interim here is a link to his website about the guides:  http://www.dominoguide.com/

Peter
Any day using a Festool is a special day.  Enjoy!

Peter

Offline fdengel

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2011, 10:06 AM »
He is using sandpaper without protecting his fingers.

Wha?

That one's new to me...

I've never done anything to protect my fingers from sandpaper (at least not when hand-sanding)...

Is that generally considered a "normal" practice?

Offline woodwreck

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #13 on: December 20, 2011, 11:13 AM »
I am sure that Rick will be back to answer questions, but in the interim here is a link to his website about the guides:  http://www.dominoguide.com/

Peter


Thank you Peter - while you're here, please tell me what the 90 degree holding device is that Tanner is using to secure the workpiece for beading the edge.
Regards,

Woodwreck

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2011, 12:00 PM »
Woodwreck, the Self-Centering Guide (SCG-10) was released about 3 months ago, and is intended to be a complement to the functionality of the previous model. The MGS-Series of guide is intended for when you have specific mortising distances that you repeatedly use, and when you need more than one distance at a time. It allows you to use multiple settings without changing those settings between operations.

The SCG guide is intended for rapidly changing the mortising distance without tools and without measuring. The plastic-coated steel cable you see is the coupling cable between stop assemblies. As one stop is moved, the other stop automatically moves in the opposite direction to always remain centered about the mortise position of the Domino joiner.



The concept for the SCG guide was developed at the same time as the MGS guide, but it took a lot more engineering to achieve the required level of precision at a cost effective rate. All of the primary components are precision milled from aircraft grade billet aluminum and anodized green for durability and aesthetics. The movable stop arms ride in a 2-piece dovetail saddle that allows them to easily slide for positioning, and clamp down firmly at the desired position. The geometry of the sliding dovetail provides a 2-way clamping action to clamp down on the stop arms, but to also pull them in tight to the dovetail face.

The stop arm assemblies are high-tolerance and milled to a precision in the 4-digit range. This is crucial to repeatability in stop arm usage because the clearance between the arm and yoke is held very tight. The pivot pin for the stop arm is stainless steel and pressed through the arm into both halves of the yoke. This also contributes to the repeatability precision. The detent positions of the stop arms (Up & Down) are controlled by micro ball plungers with stainless steel balls.

The baseplate is similar to the tried and true baseplate of the MGS guides with a durable powder coat finish. It uses the same centering plates for accurately re-installing on your Domino without re-calibration. The SCG guide does require a one-time calibration to center it on your Domino the first time you use it, but the centering plates ensure the same positioning each time you install it to your machine. The guide mounts to the Domino base using the existing threaded accessory holes, so you do not need to modify your Domino in any way to use it.

One of the most common questions I receive is whether the guides will work with the old pin-style Domino versus the new paddle-style Domino. The answer is, yes, it works with both models.

I take extreme pride in the fact that you will not find a negative review of either of my guides anywhere on the internet by someone that owns one. In the 2 years that I have been selling guides, I have never had one returned for warranty because I inspect every one of them as they are fabricated. (I did have one pulley defective recently, but that is now part of my inspection process to ensure it is never repeated.) I have never had a customer return a guide due to dissatisfaction, but I did have one guide returned unused due to (I suspect) financial hardship. I take customer satisfaction just as seriously as Festool does.

The guides are available direct from me on my website (http://www.dominoguide.com/) or from several Festool dealers. I am pleased to announce that as of a few weeks ago, Rockler Woodworking is now a stocking distributor of my SCG-10 guides. They are available on-line right now, and will be listed in the next printed catalog. If their demand remains as high as it has been in the first few weeks, they will probably show up on the store shelves too. (Initial sales were high enough that Rockler went into backorder within 2 weeks, but I just delivered a large shipment to them yesterday.)

The popularity of the SCG-10 guide has surprised even me, but there are quite a few people taking advantage of the Combination kit on my website for both models at a reduced price. (I need to create an MGS-30 combo kit, but haven't gotten around to it yet. Look for that soon, or shoot me an email if interested.)

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2011, 12:26 PM »

Thank you Peter - while you're here, please tell me what the 90 degree holding device is that Tanner is using to secure the workpiece for beading the edge.

What you are seeing in the picture is the Festool VacSys. Unfortunately, it is not available in North America due to a (in my opinion, silly) UL restriction. I can't discuss that aspect without permission, so we'll leave it at that.

It's a great product and I would love to see it become available here. Surprisingly, I get quite a few people asking about it because I also showed it in my MGS guide's video, that was made before I knew VacSys would not be available here.

I didn't really need VacSys for that operation, but I used it out of caution, because if the granite piece fell over and broke, we would have had to start over from scratch, as no 2 pieces of granite I have are the same size.

VacSys consists of a vacuum pump in a systainer and the articulated vacuum body. There are 3 different vacuum heads that can be placed on the articulated body. When used on a non-MFT table, the vacuum body incorporates a self-clamping vacuum to hold the VacSys to the table. A foot peddle releases vacuum pressure to change the workpiece. The articulated head will rotate 360 degrees and tilt 90 degrees.

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2011, 12:33 PM »
He is using sandpaper without protecting his fingers.

Wha?

That one's new to me...

I've never done anything to protect my fingers from sandpaper (at least not when hand-sanding)...

Is that generally considered a "normal" practice?


No, it is not normal practice. It was sarcasm.  [big grin] Don't worry. Even I didn't know Chris was being sarcastic at first until I got half way through his posting, and then I busted a gut laughing.  [big grin]

Offline woodwreck

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2011, 02:31 PM »
Woodwreck, the Self-Centering Guide (SCG-10) was released about 3 months ago, and is intended to be a complement to the functionality of the previous model. The MGS-Series of guide ....

The concept for the SCG guide was developed at the same time as the MGS guide, ......

The popularity of the SCG-10 guide has surprised even me, but there are quite a few people taking advantage of the Combination kit on my website for both models at a reduced price. (I need to create an MGS-30 combo kit, but haven't gotten around to it yet. Look for that soon, or shoot me an email if interested.)

Thank you for the exceptional detail but unless I missed it, you do not clarify if the original MGS can be retrofitted or by whatever term, to accept the new SCG green mechanism, It appears they are two standalone products?
Regards,

Woodwreck

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2011, 02:41 PM »

Thank you for the exceptional detail but unless I missed it, you do not clarify if the original MGS can be retrofitted or by whatever term, to accept the new SCG green mechanism, It appears they are two standalone products?


No. They are two separate products with slightly different baseplates. They both mount the same and use the same centering plates, but the design of the baseplate is unique for each.

Online Richard/RMW

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2011, 07:41 PM »
I am pleased to announce that as of a few weeks ago, Rockler Woodworking is now a stocking distributor of my SCG-10 guides. They are available on-line right now, and will be listed in the next printed catalog. If their demand remains as high as it has been in the first few weeks, they will probably show up on the store shelves too.

Rick,

Congratulations on getting into the Rockler lineup, these days I think that is the gold-standard of reaching the woodworking target audience. That is a major testament to the product and your exceptional design and execution.

If it is not too nosey a question, is there anything you care to share about what it took to get them interested in carrying the product, not pricing but how you went about it?

Thanks,

RMW
Add-on products for Festool @ www.ripdogs.com

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2011, 07:46 PM »
Rick,

Congrats!   [thumbs up] [thumbs up] [thumbs up]

Peter
Any day using a Festool is a special day.  Enjoy!

Peter

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2011, 10:21 PM »

If it is not too nosey a question, is there anything you care to share about what it took to get them interested in carrying the product, not pricing but how you went about it?

Thanks,

RMW

RMW, that's an interesting question that I don't normally get to share with others. This will be kind of fun for me to answer. I have a long history with Rockler that put some things in motion a decade ago, but only part of this is pertinent to them carrying my guides. Simply that it told me what doors needed to be opened, not necessarily opening those doors.

I've known, and been known by, the editorial staff at the Woodworker's Journal since before it was the Woodworker's Journal. I've done some freelance writing for WWJ over the years, and WWJ did a "What's New" product description for my MGS guide last year. Rob Johnstone and his wife were part of the editor's trip to Festool-Germany that Festool invited me to as a "Thank You" for the manuals I have written. Rockler and WWJ headquarters are on the far side of town from me.

Earlier this summer, Rob Johnstone sent me an email saying, "hey, don't you write manuals...and would you be interested in writing for some of our new products...." Normally the magazine and product groups aren't related, so this gave me new contacts in the product development and purchasing group. I was mainly dealing with their product development engineers, though.

This took place while the SCG Guide was still only half in my head and half in the computer, so I didn't reveal the new design to them just yet. The product manager had seen my MGS-30 guide, but I hadn't told them about the SCG-10 until the week I released it to the public.

I had several meetings at Rockler for the manuals I was working on, so I set one up with the product manager to show him the new SCG-10 guide. He was impressed with the new design and we started cutting the "red tape" (lots of paperwork) to carry the guide pretty quickly. With the paperwork out of the way, I delivered a small quantity of guides to them with the understanding that I would have a large quantity held in reserve for 24-hour turnaround in case the sales spiked as hard as I suspected they could.

The sales did spike as I predicted, but it took 2 weeks instead of the 1 week I predicted for them to run out of inventory. Because of that 1 week delay, I let my guard down, and got blindsided by the large purchase order they sent me late last week. Over the weekend, when I wasn't in the workshop with Tanner building the table, I was up in the office building guides. (Thankfully I had the distraction of watching Tanner play his XBox on the office TV, otherwise I would have gone stir-crazy.) I delivered the full order of guides to them yesterday.

I don't normally mention it publicly, but I also had the normal shipment of guides to Festool-Australia to complete this weekend too. Festool-AU is the equivalent to Festool-USA except they are privately owned and can therefore distribute my guides at the corporate level through the dealer network. Festool-AU can do this, but Festool-USA is prohibited from distributing my guides. This is why I cannot sell guides to Australian customers through my website. There is an exclusivity agreement for the whole Australian continent.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2011, 10:26 PM by Rick Christopherson »

Offline Tezzer

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2011, 11:39 PM »
I don't normally mention it publicly, but I also had the normal shipment of guides to Festool-Australia to complete this weekend too. Festool-AU is the equivalent to Festool-USA except they are privately owned and can therefore distribute my guides at the corporate level through the dealer network. Festool-AU can do this, but Festool-USA is prohibited from distributing my guides. This is why I cannot sell guides to Australian customers through my website. There is an exclusivity agreement for the whole Australian continent.


I got one and its not to bad, massive improvement on the original. Well done.
MY FURNITURE AND STUFF.

http://www.timbercabinets.com.au/





.

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #23 on: December 24, 2011, 04:33 PM »
We finished up the tables yesterday, just in time for Mom's Christmas present from Tanner tonight. So I thought I would throw the last couple of pictures into this thread.

Since there was no school on Friday, I dragged Tanner and his sister to my house for the night on Thursday. The chore I was dreading was cleaning out the gunky sludge from my airless sprayer that hasn't been used in more than a year. It took about 30 seconds of 1200 psi pressure to blow the hardened plug of lacquer out of the end of the line, but after that, the rest of the cleaning was routine.

Now that I am no longer using the airless on a regular basis, I am going to convert it to a hopper-feed (versus bucket-feed) next week, so I can easily flush the lines after use instead of waiting until I need to use it again. (Found all the parts on-line for the conversion last night.) When it was getting used regularly, all I had to do was prime the pump and the pressurized lacquer would clean everything else.

I masked off the granite and sprayed the legs and tops separately. I found this picture that Tanner took of himself on his Facebook page, so I swiped it from him.

Darth?...Lord Vader?....is that you?



I used 2 coats of pre-cat lacquer, but didn't bother with a sanding sealer this time. Normally I would use 1-coat of sanding sealer and 1 or 2 coats of top-coat, but this was too small of a project to mess around with flushing the lines.

Oh, I had left these parts exposed to UV light long enough before finishing that they did at least take on some good coloring. It's not the right time of year for it, but they did sit outside in the low sun for 2 days to at least lose some of their brightness. This wasn't obvious until the lacquer went down.

The next step was creating the substrate that connected the top frame to the base legs. This was 1/2" ApplePly (like baltic birch, but a higher grade). Because this was a simple operation, I made Tanner make all of the cuts with the TS55. Because the Granite is not perfectly square, neither is the substrate, so this was the perfect operation for the TS55 and guide rail. The two substrates were marked and cut to fit perfectly within the rabbetted  frames. (This is a live picture, but I did move in to grab the off-cut before Tanner finished the cut. And if you are foolish enough to comment about the absence of safety glasses, be forewarned, that you will receive the full wrath that that comment deserves. So think about it before you make it!  [scared])



Oh, you may have noticed the TV in the background. That is actually part of my video camera dolly I made last year. My Canon 3-CCD XL1s video camera mounts above the monitor so I can see the monitor for feedback or as a teleprompter. When not in use for video production, it also serves as the shop TV, because I can't stand "silence" in the shop. I need some noise. (Extra credit to anyone that can identify the movie.)








« Last Edit: December 24, 2011, 04:39 PM by Rick Christopherson »

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #24 on: December 24, 2011, 04:46 PM »
After the substrates were "tweaked" to fit perfectly in the rabbets (with the edge sander), the screw locations were marked, drilled, and countersunk. I used my "go-to" general purpose faceframe screws to secure the substrate to the endgrain of the legs, so they were 1-1/2" coarse-thread faceframe screws (I buy in bulk) at 2 screws per leg. Yes, a countersink is not the proper profile for the pan-head screw, but it is sufficient to sink the head below the surface of the substrate. (We used a Festool 492520 countersink, which is outstanding!!).



Here is a picture of Tanner and his finished table. Yes, there are several motorcycles in the workshop right now. It does make it tough to work, but I have a normal business project going that required my garage for a large piece of equipment I am documenting, so the motorcycles had to move to the basement for a couple months.



Here is a picture of both of our tables. Of course it has the gratuitous backdrop of the "Wall of Shame".



Offline arbfincarp

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #25 on: December 24, 2011, 05:16 PM »
great job guys merry Christmas

 

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #26 on: December 24, 2011, 05:19 PM »
With these tables completed, I am curious about what other people honestly think about the design. The design suited the need I had for my original table before Tanner asked to make one for his mom. I'm still "on the fence" for my opinion on this design even though it fits nicely for the original purpose.

Of course, "attaboy's" are nice to hear, but I am self-confident enough to ask for critical comments without being offended by negative thoughts. I would like to hear about those aspects of the design that other people find to be less than flattering.

For one, I think the overall height is too tall, and will likely cut the legs down by an inch or even two. However, my biggest question is whether the flowing shape of the legs fits with the squareness of the top. This was the reason I added the round edges of the fluting, but I am not sure it is sufficient to pull the two pieces together aesthetically.

Offline ScotF

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #27 on: December 24, 2011, 05:34 PM »
Hi Rick,

I think these came out very nice -- I really do like the leg design and I agree a little shorter might be nice.  I love the edge profile too, but I might lighten the top just a little -- maybe cut a slight bevel or make it a little thinner.  Overall I think that these came out nice.

Scot

Offline Rick Christopherson

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #28 on: December 24, 2011, 05:50 PM »
Funny you mention that, because the original design did have a slight bevel on the frame that I did not implement on the final.

I agree that the top is a little heavy for the design. Unfortunately, the thickness of the granite is not something I can control. The granite is 1" to 1-1/8", so all I can do is make this either less prominent, or part of the design. Yup, I could shrink the frame down to this thickness, but I would need to come up with a new way to connect the base to the top. The difference is due to the thickness of the substrate.

Nevertheless, this is a good thing to keep in mind if I decide to make similar designs using this granite. Maybe I could find a better way of hiding the substrate?
Thanks!

Offline woodwreck

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Re: Interesting Domino Application/Modification
« Reply #29 on: December 29, 2011, 12:07 PM »
You have a lot of highly unique things displayed here and/or stated, so I am prompted to ask at least one question in response - at a glance I count roughly 200 freely acquired granite offcuts.

What on earth did you intend to do with them, e.g. make similar frames to fit each off cut, or do you plan to machine the pieces to size? In the case of the latter, what machinery would you use - that stuff is incredibly messy and airborne toxic beyond the residential/garage tolerances just for starters.

TIA
Regards,

Woodwreck