Author Topic: MFTC portable workshop  (Read 488323 times)

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Offline TheSergeant

  • Posts: 60
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #390 on: March 17, 2016, 06:19 PM »
@Mitchewd , phenomenal work on that DIY flip down rail setup!  This is exactly the design that Festool should have used on their system.  The sliding dovetail keeps the rail parallel to the table top and prevents racking.  Your execution is absurdly simple and looks incredibly effective, well done.  I'm hoping to make basically the same thing out of aluminum the next time I'm visiting my buddy with a mill.  You make a lot of good points about the cuts outs, painting the frame, etc well.  Thanks for posting!!!

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Offline Mitchewd

  • Posts: 57
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #391 on: March 18, 2016, 09:10 PM »
Thanks everyone for the comments!  This build has been a lot of fun and very useful.

Offline Timberrat

  • Posts: 9
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #392 on: March 20, 2016, 01:24 PM »
I would love to see pics of the guys doing the mftc for the dewalt boxes
I have purchased a lot of these and want to build mftc for them

And also awesome job on the rail setup I will be making that also

Offline mirock

  • Posts: 172
    • Yotube
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #393 on: March 20, 2016, 02:31 PM »
It also works in my kitchen when the garage is too cold...

Absolutely cool). Need to take this practice for me). Sometimes my family complains that I stay in the garage too much time. So, I can bring something home and work with TV and kids)
my video channels:
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJFCZ2slzAMjP6ChFxYPv6A
And:
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSDylM1i5mnPHKtfuO0Jjvg
Ts-55\C 12\OF 1400\OF1010\Carvex420\HL 850 EB\Kapex 120\TXS\DR18

Offline Vegaroma

  • Posts: 2
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #394 on: March 21, 2016, 07:28 AM »
Got a plans from Tim.
I'm going to do for Bosch l-boxx. Already successfully changed MFTC overall sizes Sketchup. I will begin the project as free time.
Thank you Tim, for prompt shipment.:)))))
« Last Edit: March 21, 2016, 07:31 AM by Vegaroma »

Offline Achevy

  • Posts: 3
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #395 on: March 30, 2016, 09:20 PM »
How did most people attach the front legs?  Unless I over looked it it wasn't specified in the plans. I haven't seen any fasteners in anyone's pictures, just glue it seems?

Offline Mitchewd

  • Posts: 57
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #396 on: March 30, 2016, 10:02 PM »
I used dominoes and glue and screws.  The legs are a clamping point and can use some extra reinforcement.  I drove the screws from the inside of the cabinet.

Offline Arny

  • Posts: 1
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #397 on: April 28, 2016, 01:31 PM »
Hi j'all,

Maybe already mentioned. Does anybody know where to get the right t tracks in Holland?

Offline JimD

  • Posts: 321
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #398 on: May 04, 2016, 07:35 PM »
Mitchewd,

I like your design too.  Hinges seem like a good idea.  My workbench is Paulk inspired and I built my version of his crosscut jig too.  It uses pins on each end (no hinges) but is otherwise like yours.  I made my pins of hickory flooring scraps.  If you set the height right, you can slide wood under the track but it works best just to lift it a bit (not necessarily off the pins). 

Jim

Offline Schoutedentom

  • Posts: 1
  • hobby woodworker
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #399 on: June 19, 2016, 09:44 AM »
Hi all,   [big grin]
As a new member on the forum, I would like to share the MFTC version I made thanks to the plans of Tim!
I did not yet inserted T-tracks or slots in the legs. Some finishes for later :-)





I made a small modification to fit my CTL26 underneath the shelf. The space for tools get's a little bit smaller, but it does work fine to fit the tracksaw!
On the handle I've added 2 wooden lockers to push the cart without moving the handle.
And on the drawers I basically did the same, to prevent the drawers from getting out of the cart (I didn't add the magnetic locks)

Regards
Tom

Offline SoonerFan

  • Posts: 308
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #400 on: June 19, 2016, 09:32 PM »
Tom,
Nice work on the MFTC!  Thanks for sharing the pictures.  Welcome to FOG.




Hi all,   [big grin]
As a new member on the forum, I would like to share the MFTC version I made thanks to the plans of Tim!
I did not yet inserted T-tracks or slots in the legs. Some finishes for later :-)





I made a small modification to fit my CTL26 underneath the shelf. The space for tools get's a little bit smaller, but it does work fine to fit the tracksaw!
On the handle I've added 2 wooden lockers to push the cart without moving the handle.
And on the drawers I basically did the same, to prevent the drawers from getting out of the cart (I didn't add the magnetic locks)

Regards
Tom

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 191
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #401 on: June 20, 2016, 10:38 PM »
Welcome. Very nice work on the table!   I just bought the plans from Tim last week.

Did you bore the holes in the top yourself?

Best,
Adam

Online mjh2157

  • Posts: 12
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #402 on: July 04, 2016, 03:49 PM »
Hi,

I just got into woodworking, and building the mftc will by my first project so I have a work table to do my future projects.  I am building to Tim's plans, except for the base of the carcass where I am using my own axle so I can avoid the box at the bottom and keep the entire carcass for my systainers.  I only get a a few hours in a week to build this as we have a toddler and another one on the way, but I really enjoy it.  I downloaded sketchup and designed my own axle, bought a 20mm axle from amazon, and a friend of mine with a metal shop mounted it onto a 1/4" plate for me (he even rounded the corners so it would be easier for me to route and inlay, he's a GOOD friend!).  I routed about an 1/8" into both pieces of wood and sandwiched the wood together with clamps and screws.  I used gorilla epoxy on the bracket and the routed area, then I used titebond 3 on the wood to wood areas.  This was my first "glue up," and it was pretty funny as I quickly discovered that someone was right when they said "you can never have enough clamps" and as I realized i put way to much glue in as it came oozing out from all sides.  Luckily my wife and daughter decided pay me a visit at that very moment to see what I was up to, they thought it was hilarious!  Using most of these tools is a first for me so I am taking my time and I am assuming any error that occurs while using them is my own as I try to get used to them.  I did as much research as I could prior to starting this hobby and htis project and sites like this one were a great a resource, so thank you for anyone that has posted.  So far I have to say the domino and the of1400 are my favorite followed by the ts55 and the carvex.  Below are some pictures of my progress so far.

Online mjh2157

  • Posts: 12
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #403 on: July 04, 2016, 07:47 PM »
more photos

Offline ART at WORK

  • Posts: 197
  • Buy less Recycle more
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #404 on: July 12, 2016, 11:47 AM »
I really liked the axil solution with the metal plate welded on to the shaft and how you fixed it in to place. a very nice job.
I wouldn't worry about the squeeze out, that happens to the best of us. Especially when you are using a new type of glue.

I was wondering for those who want to keep their MFTC as light as possible.
So this is a question for all those engineers out there.

If one used a slightly thinner base plate and routed the plate flush in to the inside and screwed it in to place and the axil passed through the side in a tight hole. Would this have the same strength as this doubling up on the outside?

Just my  [2cents]

Pip
Kapex 120 + UG Set, ETS 150/3, DF 500, RO 90, MFT/3, CTL 36 AC, RO 150, 0F 900, OF 2200, T15+3,  CDD 12, TS 55, A5 Router table, First Aid kit, LR 32 SYS, FS 800, FS 1400/2, FS 1400/2 LR32 FS2 3000, CTL Midi + Cleaning Set, Clamps, Parallel Guides, Centrotec drills, Zobo Forstner set and countersinks, Routers, Systainers, Sortainers, Sys Cart, Syslite

Offline Scorpion

  • Posts: 429
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #405 on: July 13, 2016, 11:14 AM »

If one used a slightly thinner base plate and routed the plate flush in to the inside and screwed it in to place and the axil passed through the side in a tight hole. Would this have the same strength as this doubling up on the outside?

Just my  [2cents]

Pip

I think you could safely go to 1/8-inch plate in this design without issue, maybe even thinner as long as the weld area can handle the load.   If we can assume the welded material will not fail - sandwiching the plate between the pieces of ply prevents the plate from deflection as pressure is put on the shaft.  Screwing a piece of plate to the inside of the ply removes that support and now the deflection is only countered by the screw/screw placement.  That being said, I think 3/16 plate would work on the inside (given the likely load if it were my cart) and lighter carts might get away with 1/8-inch. 

If lighter was the goal, I'd use aluminum in either design or a combination if using a fastener in place of a weld.

Offline Scorpion

  • Posts: 429
MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #406 on: July 13, 2016, 04:58 PM »
Nice work MJH2157.  Since you shared yours, I figured I'd share my solution.  I chose a slightly different approach mostly because of the tools I have available.  I machined some hubs out of 6061 aluminum Rod I had in the shelf.



I then laid out the spindle design for the wheels I'm using. 



After a little lathe time, I have the first spindle.



Spindle fits into the hub which allows me to make a different spindles should I choose other wheels in the future.



This mockup in the wheel shows how I retain the spindle in the hub.  The 1/2-inch bolt not only retains the spindle, it adds strength so the aluminum isn't taking all of the load.



To install it, a 1 1/8 (IIRC) forstner bit is used to a 1/2-inch depth and I'm starting with screws as the fasteners.  If screws don't end up strong enough, I can always use a backing plate I can recess inside the box/casing.



An interesting twist would be to combine the two designs.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2016, 10:28 PM by Scorpion »

Online mjh2157

  • Posts: 12
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #407 on: July 14, 2016, 10:45 PM »
Wow, you are talented!  Thank you for sharing that, I'm seriously impressed by the quality of your work!  It's funny because when I was researching building my mftc I saw you had pictures of your two carcasses and I noticed you didn't have the wooden drawer which I didn't want, but the pictures stopped there.  I wondered what your solution was at the time as no one else appeared to do all systainers.  I'd really like to pick up metal work and milling in the future and meld it into my woodwork more. Your posts are a great inspiration.  I love the way you threaded the end of the axle, nice touch!  May I ask, how did you attach the green latch at the bottom of the carcass opposite the wheel, so that it can turn up and down?  I was thinking that if I screwed it from inside the carcass that it would eventually unscrew itself.

Pip,

Thank you as well for your kind comments! With regard to my axle setup, I just wanted to clarify for anyone that tries it or a hybrid, when I was working out the fabrication with my friend that fabricated it based on my little drawing, he actually came up with the solution to drill a 20mm hole through the plate, insert the rod in to the hole, and weld it from the back side, so that there would be no weld on the front side to deal with later around the axle that would have resulted in reaming out the back of the hole in the wood later.  The welds on the back side were ground smooth which is much easier to do then it would have been on the front side where you would have a hard time grinding the weld around the axle.

Best Regards,
Matt

Offline Scorpion

  • Posts: 429
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #408 on: July 14, 2016, 11:40 PM »
Wow, you are talented!  Thank you for sharing that, I'm seriously impressed by the quality of your work!  It's funny because when I was researching building my mftc I saw you had pictures of your two carcasses and I noticed you didn't have the wooden drawer which I didn't want, but the pictures stopped there.  I wondered what your solution was at the time as no one else appeared to do all systainers.  I'd really like to pick up metal work and milling in the future and meld it into my woodwork more. Your posts are a great inspiration.  I love the way you threaded the end of the axle, nice touch!  May I ask, how did you attach the green latch at the bottom of the carcass opposite the wheel, so that it can turn up and down?  I was thinking that if I screwed it from inside the carcass that it would eventually unscrew itself.

Best Regards,
Matt

Matt,

Thanks for the compliments.  I very much enjoy machining and, as you pointed out, it can compliment woodworking nicely on various projects.  I intentionally try to cross disciplines whenever I can because l actually prefer the combination and in some cases the precision of machining can simplify and speed things up.

So the real answer on what happens to my MFTC projects is I'm not done yet.  I got sidetracked about the time I posted by house projects and I'm just now getting back to the it.  Unfortunately (or fortunately depending on how you look at it) I always have a dozen projects in flight so I can work on whatever energizes me at the moment.  For the past year or so I've been working on what energizes the Mrs. so I can sleep inside.  :)

Since I enjoy machining so much I plan to make most of the bracketry out of aluminum and extrusions for the frame of the table top.  I have noticed that the base cart (wheels, Systainers loaded, and the shell with slides) is fairly heavy so I'm second guessing my strategy now that I've been able to pull one around.  I can deal with heavy around the shop but if they have to go up the stairs, forget it. 

My plan for the latches was to machine something but now I'm leaning toward the use of a pronged t-nut on the inside and a machine screw to hold on the latch with some thread-lock (blue) to keep the screw from unscrewing itself.  The t-nut can easily be recessed if it ends up in the way or, if I'm lucky, the 1/16th it protrudes won't matter.

I really like your spindle design.  In fact, if the parts were aluminum and the end was threaded, it would be not only simpler than mine to make, but cleaner.  The more I think about it, I'm disappointed I didn't think about it myself and I'm too far to make the switch. 

~ Matt (also)

Online mjh2157

  • Posts: 12
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #409 on: January 02, 2017, 08:53 PM »
Hi All,

So had a chance to resume work on my mftc today.  Made the legs, glued them up, made all the domino holes in them, radiused the fixed legs, and made my own levelling feet by combining two that I like to get the best of both worlds.  I really wanted something that could be adjusted quickly by hand, could articulate to uneven surfaces, was durable, and and had anti vibe/anti skid pads that wouldn't fall off.  They are really solid and can level over 30mm (i know overkill).   I'm really happy with the way they turned out, which is unusual for me! [big grin]

Anyway, pic below.  Hopefully they are of use to someone.  All I have left now is finish paint/poly and final assembly. 

Best,
Matt


Online Tinker

  • Posts: 3470
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #410 on: January 03, 2017, 03:21 AM »
That is very impressive.
Wayne H. Tinker

Online mjh2157

  • Posts: 12
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #411 on: January 03, 2017, 03:00 PM »
Thank you, I hope it helps someone in the future.

Best,
Matt

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 623
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #412 on: January 03, 2017, 09:22 PM »
Man this thread has so much good stuff in it! Glad to see its still alive and growing!
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Online mjh2157

  • Posts: 12
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #413 on: January 07, 2017, 01:41 PM »
Hi,

Received a few emails about my levelling foot and great point about how to lock the systainers in place.  I posted the link for a lock at the very bottom.  Wish I could understand the guy in the video, but his lock is awesome.

Here is a link to the leveling foot::

https://www.amazon.com/Winco-8NTNT-Stainless-Snap-Lock-Non-Skid/dp/B00EI1N2QQ

Here is a link to the plastic leveling foot, don't mind the picture of the angle bracket on the site.  This is the actual product.  Parker leveling foot 21-001:

https://www.hydradynellc.com/product/21-001/leveling-foot

Here is a link for threaded rod:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JDU9Z9A/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Here is a link for threaded inserts:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002WC8TW0/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1


Obviously, you don't have to buy these things at these sites, you should shop around.  Amazon doesn't seem to be the cheapest for industrial parts/machine parts, but you have a starting point on specs. 

If you need anything at all let me know. 

Regarding the bar lock I was just thinking about that the other day, I'm yet to figure that one out.  If you have any ideas I'd definitely be interest.  There was one I saw way back when on this site, but I haven't really delved into how it was done.  It's the best one i've seen, but it also utilizes the wood blocks at the bottom for the wooden drawer.  I don't have that, I ran my systainers down to the bottom.  It's at 8:52:




I'll post this on the general forum too for everyone.

Best,
Matt

Offline -woodsman-

  • Posts: 75
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #414 on: March 18, 2017, 10:23 PM »
Is there an imperial parts list provided in the purchase?

Online mjh2157

  • Posts: 12
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #415 on: April 10, 2017, 12:13 AM »
It took me a crazy amount of time, but I'm finally done with my first woodwork project.  Now I have a workbench to do my future projects.  I learned a tremendous amount doing this workbench and although I found many moments of it to be stressful, it was a very rewarding project. 

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 348
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #416 on: April 10, 2017, 04:56 AM »
McMaster-Carr has a wide selection of leveling feet at decent prices.

https://www.mcmaster.com/#leveling-feet/=174tlcq
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 623
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #417 on: April 10, 2017, 11:18 AM »
It took me a crazy amount of time, but I'm finally done with my first woodwork project.  Now I have a workbench to do my future projects.  I learned a tremendous amount doing this workbench and although I found many moments of it to be stressful, it was a very rewarding project. 
Looks great man! Good job! Should serve you well for many years to come!
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline Billedis

  • Posts: 572
Re: MFTC portable workshop
« Reply #418 on: April 10, 2017, 11:27 AM »
@mjh2157 That is a table to be proud of.  Thank you for sharing.  Bill