Author Topic: DIY Flag Stop  (Read 5423 times)

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Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3596
DIY Flag Stop
« on: July 04, 2015, 02:21 PM »
When my installation starts up in a few days, the initial part of the build will involve batching hundreds of different cuts at a variety of sizes, so I wanted to get everything set up once on the MFT and UG Cart and then cut straight through till all the boards are sized.  That means I need a few extra flag stops to accommodate all the different sizes.  I did order an extra Festool one, but then I figured why not just whip out a couple of my own?

There may be a more straightforward design for a DIY model, but I'm actually pretty bad at designing anything that has movable parts, even when it's something as simple as a rotating piece of metal.  When I was  a kid, after my parents saw how much I liked building with blocks and Lincoln logs, they got me an Erector Set.  But I just stared at the parts, having no intuition about what to do with them, and then went back to my blocks.  All this is just to say that for my design, I simply followed the Festool flag stop.

I went through a couple iterations, first trying one with a T-Bolt to hold the bolt securing the flag -- but after cracking the wood I realized it was simpler just to mount the 1/4" x 20 screw through a plain bored hole.

First I cut the metal strap to size with an angle grinder and put a bolt hole through it (using the short UG cart flag as the template, since that's where it will be mounted):

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Cut a piece of oak to size on the table saw then routed out the part that slides along the fence -- I made a long piece so I could just use the same board if I made any errors along the way, which did, in fact, happen.  It's important to know what length bolt you're using in advance in order to size the piece properly so the bolt doesn't extend too far down and scrape the bottom of the fence, or, come up short.  Washers can help fix the former error, but not the latter:

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On the first version, I did the through hole for the flag bolt first, but on the second iteration, I realized it would be easier to mortise the lock nut first, and then use that as a reference for where you drill the hole.  There aren't too many times where I wish I had a mortising machine, but this was one of them.  No matter -- the Multimaster + drill for cleanout worked pretty well.

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Using a nylon locking nut -- rather than a regular one -- is key, because it keeps the bolt tight when you flip the flag up and down.

Drilling the bolt hole was the one tricky part of this build.  I eye-balled how far down the nut rested in the mortise, and then placed the nut on the end of the piece to mark the center.  I ended up having to clean out a bit more material on the bottom to get the nut to line up with the hole:
 
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I used a 1/4"x20 hex bolt.  On the festool flag stop, there are holes through the plastic at the bottom of the mortise where you can stick a small hex wrench to hold the nut while unfastening the screw.  I deliberately made my mortise tight so I could simply use a flat head screwdriver to hold the nut in place while I tightened the bolt.

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Next I used the Multimaster to make the cut out at the bottom to fit the M6 nut -- (T-track on Festool fence doesn't accept 1/4"x20]:

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And drilled the hole from the bottom so I knew it would line up:

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Now I've got a new flag stop, and a familiar process to produce more:

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Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

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Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 864
Re: DIY Flag Stop
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2015, 03:37 PM »
Looks good. You might want to consider using a cross dowel with some blue Loctite.

http://www.woodpeck.com/crossdowels.html

They are fairly available most places and would just require drilling a hole. Should making fabricating easier using your drill press

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3596
Re: DIY Flag Stop
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2015, 04:06 PM »
Thanks for the tip.

Looks good. You might want to consider using a cross dowel with some blue Loctite.

http://www.woodpeck.com/crossdowels.html

They are fairly available most places and would just require drilling a hole. Should making fabricating easier using your drill press
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline cubevandude

  • Posts: 30
Re: DIY Flag Stop
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2018, 04:48 PM »
Thanks for the writeup.  I am trying to find some composite decking cutoffs to make these from.

Offline fyme

  • Posts: 18
Re: DIY Flag Stop
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2018, 03:15 PM »
This is my project flag stop :)









Colleagues 3d printed and wiped on the laser :)





This is our forum project on didunderground.pl :)

Offline cubevandude

  • Posts: 30
Re: DIY Flag Stop
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2018, 05:57 PM »
Very nice.  Are you going to share some files or more details with us?  I tried to search around on your forum, but its in a foreign language and was having a hard time.

Offline fyme

  • Posts: 18
Re: DIY Flag Stop
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2018, 03:52 PM »
Sure  [smile]

3d printable model https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1AJFRl591nQblTY6vxWUnmszNHiCeAUE9?usp=sharing

metal parts



This is for the t track profile that i did (15x10 mm)










Offline sandy

  • Posts: 58
Re: DIY Flag Stop
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2018, 07:46 AM »
Wow!!  All these instructions, details, plans, and photos for a flag stop....   

I'm impressed!!  Particularly since I've owned a Sears Radial Arm Saw (RAS) for about 42 years, and when I needed to cut multiple items the same length I grabbed the closest piece of scrap wood and the closest clamp, and I clamped the wood to the fence.  Now I'm sorry that I didn't fully document the process, but if anyone needs it, I'll happily draw up plans and take pictures, and I'll sell them for $10. 

Of course I now have a Kapex in my shop, and it has a flag stop, but on the few occasions that I use the RAS, I still use my original approach when I need to make repetitive cuts.

Sandy

Offline cubevandude

  • Posts: 30
Re: DIY Flag Stop
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2018, 07:51 PM »
The whole idea of the MFT is to break down sheet goods into smaller pieces, such as making cabinets.  When making cabinets you have many repeatable cuts.  So flag stops can be set and then flipped out of the way.  Makes things easier as you break down the sheet you can size the pieces as you go.  Ideally you nay have 10-20 flag stops set up, you can flip up and down.  Here's a good example:
http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-jigs-tool-enhancements/mft-rebate-stop/?action=dlattach;attach=236029;image
http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-jigs-tool-enhancements/mft3-money-well-spent/?action=dlattach;attach=228525;image

I think the MFT top is one of the greatest inventions along with the track saw and wish I had it years ago on the job.  Blocks and clamps work, but you might as well measure each piece and straight edge it to and go back 40 years in time.  I studied the whole Festool system before I made a MFT top (thanks again PeterP.) and then bought a Makita Plunge saw.  Now I am working on getting the smaller pieces of the system, such as these flag stops.  I really appreciate all the work others do in making drawings for these things as I don't have access to the items themselves  to measure them.  I sure can't afford to buy them at $42 each.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2018, 07:59 PM by cubevandude »

Offline Corwin

  • Posts: 2640
Re: DIY Flag Stop
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2018, 10:19 PM »
...  Blocks and clamps work, but you might as well measure each piece and straight edge it to and go back 40 years in time. 

Heck, even 40 years ago we were using flip stops (same as what Festool calls flip stops today). Not like these things are new or anything.  [wink]
Looks like your rabbit joint is a hare off! ;)