Author Topic: Router planing sled  (Read 77509 times)

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Online Cheese

  • Posts: 4823
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #30 on: October 12, 2015, 11:13 AM »
Here's my version of Nick Offerman's flattening sled.  I used phenolic-coated baltic birch for the sled to minimize debris obstructing the travel of the router.  Mine is built to accommodate the OF 2200, but it will also work with the OF 1400 just as well.  The main beams and glide rails are the straightest Douglas fir I could find.  The main beams are each made from three pieces of 2x4 stock, glued and screwed together. 

I like it...I especially like the use of phenolic for the base, the router must just glide over the phenolic surface.

Are there any hold downs for the router sled on the side rails, or is the weight of the router and sled enough to keep it in-place on the side rails?

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Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3612
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #31 on: October 12, 2015, 11:19 AM »
Here's my version of Nick Offerman's flattening sled.  I used phenolic-coated baltic birch for the sled to minimize debris obstructing the travel of the router.  Mine is built to accommodate the OF 2200, but it will also work with the OF 1400 just as well.  The main beams and glide rails are the straightest Douglas fir I could find.  The main beams are each made from three pieces of 2x4 stock, glued and screwed together. 

I like it...I especially like the use of phenolic for the base, the router must just glide over the phenolic surface.

Are there any hold downs for the router sled on the side rails, or is the weight of the router and sled enough to keep it in-place on the side rails?

Thanks.  That 18# OF 2200 glides inside the slide like it was on wet ice.  The slide weighs another 10# or so, and I've found no need to hold it down.  It has to slide on the glide rails, so that pretty much precludes clamping. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Mavrik

  • Posts: 240
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #32 on: October 12, 2015, 11:19 AM »
It's the magic warp-or-twist cure.
I take very little with each pass.
Use my most powerful router.
And use the lowest speed setting .

Not really sure why i use the slowest speed.
Makes it quieter, works fine and seems less violent and more controlled.
:)
TS55, MFT 1080, PS300, EHL 65, Domino, OF 1010, CTL 22, RO 125, BS75

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3612
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #33 on: October 12, 2015, 11:23 AM »
It's the magic warp-or-twist cure.
I take very little with each pass.
Use my most powerful router.
And use the lowest speed setting .

Not really sure why i use the slowest speed.
Makes it quieter, works fine and seems less violent and more controlled.
:)

I use pretty much the same process.  I use a 1-3/4" Amana 45453 bit which, ironically, specifies a max shaft speed of 27,500 RPM.  Given the spinning mass involved, I won't take it over 16,000 RPM for safety reasons. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 4823
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #34 on: October 12, 2015, 11:25 AM »

Then have at it with the router on the sled. I will usually take lighter passes which makes for more work but I think the results are better.

Once you are finished, you now have one surface that is flat. If the slab is narrower than my planer (about 12 inches) I might just run it through the planer. Otherwise it gets flipped over so the flat side is on the table, secured so it doesn't slide and then repeat the router process.

@rvieceli  or anyone else...
I've milled a number of PTFE (Teflon) flats for proper thickness and realized early on that if I removed 1/8" off of one side of the PTFE, I'd also need to remove 1/8" off of the other side or the thing would "potato chip" on me.

Is this also the case when flattening wood slabs?
« Last Edit: October 12, 2015, 11:28 AM by Cheese »

Offline Wuffles

  • Posts: 1313
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #35 on: October 12, 2015, 11:37 AM »

Then have at it with the router on the sled. I will usually take lighter passes which makes for more work but I think the results are better.

Once you are finished, you now have one surface that is flat. If the slab is narrower than my planer (about 12 inches) I might just run it through the planer. Otherwise it gets flipped over so the flat side is on the table, secured so it doesn't slide and then repeat the router process.

@rvieceli  or anyone else...
I've milled a number of PTFE (Teflon) flats for proper thickness and realized early on that if I removed 1/8" off of one side of the PTFE, I'd also need to remove 1/8" off of the other side or the thing would "potato chip" on me.

Is this also the case when flattening wood slabs?

Interesting what other people say about this, but from my experience I am only taking off enough to get both sides flat and it's not happened to me. Mine are well seasoned though.

Nothing calculated about what I'm removing from each side if you catch my drift.
Tool list updated to reflect knowledge :: hammer, screwdriver, one pozi bit, and another bigger hammer.

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 4010
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #36 on: October 12, 2015, 04:51 PM »
Whether it Pringles (TM) up or down, and how much is determined by the residual stress in the wood. And whether that stress is tension or compression.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 4823
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #37 on: October 12, 2015, 10:53 PM »
Whether it Pringles (TM) up or down, and how much is determined by the residual stress in the wood. And whether that stress is tension or compression.

Yea @Holmz
I get that... my question really is, PTFE is a compression molded product and because there are internal stresses in molded products (whether injection molded, rotational molded or compression molded) do the internal stresses inherent in molded products equate to the same stresses inherent in natural materials such as wood? I think there may be a correlation between them. Not because they are related materials, but maybe because there is a "grain pattern" in all of the materials mentioned,

So, as a newbee to the woodworking field, my question still stands...is it necessary to remove the same amount of material from each side of the slab to retain a stable and flat slab or can one remove 1/4" from one side and 1/16" from the other side and achieve equilibrium?

Ya and I do like the Pringles anecdote...kind of reminds me of some of the humour of @Wuffles

Offline Wuffles

  • Posts: 1313
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #38 on: October 13, 2015, 02:29 AM »
Whether it Pringles (TM) up or down, and how much is determined by the residual stress in the wood. And whether that stress is tension or compression.

Yea @Holmz
I get that... my question really is, PTFE is a compression molded product and because there are internal stresses in molded products (whether injection molded, rotational molded or compression molded) do the internal stresses inherent in molded products equate to the same stresses inherent in natural materials such as wood? I think there may be a correlation between them. Not because they are related materials, but maybe because there is a "grain pattern" in all of the materials mentioned,

So, as a newbee to the woodworking field, my question still stands...is it necessary to remove the same amount of material from each side of the slab to retain a stable and flat slab or can one remove 1/4" from one side and 1/16" from the other side and achieve equilibrium?

Ya and I do like the Pringles anecdote...kind of reminds me of some of the humour of @Wuffles

Also from experience, now I come to think of it, you're kind of dealing with the fall-out of something that has already twisted, cupped, pringled. That's the point of the sled - to me anyway. I'm normally taking off the smashed edges of a pringle from the bottom of the tube to make it nicer - in wood terms.

For the record, I do not buy Pringles. I buy Aldi's own brand - similar packaging, well over half the price and the BBQ flavour are to die for, well they are if you steal them from my cupboard. In wood terms, they are probably Bosch.
Tool list updated to reflect knowledge :: hammer, screwdriver, one pozi bit, and another bigger hammer.

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 4010
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #39 on: October 13, 2015, 07:42 AM »
Whether it Pringles (TM) up or down, and how much is determined by the residual stress in the wood. And whether that stress is tension or compression.

Yea @Holmz
I get that... my question really is, PTFE is a compression molded product and because there are internal stresses in molded products (whether injection molded, rotational molded or compression molded) do the internal stresses inherent in molded products equate to the same stresses inherent in natural materials such as wood? I think there may be a correlation between them. Not because they are related materials, but maybe because there is a "grain pattern" in all of the materials mentioned,

So, as a newbee to the woodworking field, my question still stands...is it necessary to remove the same amount of material from each side of the slab to retain a stable and flat slab or can one remove 1/4" from one side and 1/16" from the other side and achieve equilibrium?

Ya and I do like the Pringles anecdote...kind of reminds me of some of the humour of @Wuffles

Extrusion are generally under compression.
I do not know of a pull-trusion, but I think I have heard the word and they would likely be under tension.
Glass and metal can be annealed and stress relieved.

Wood can be either, and wood can also be both in the same piece in different places.

I doubt that the surface of the wood has different stress than the core, so I doubt it needs to be even.
and the movement from moisture is probably a different mechanism.
But "I dunno" ???


Offline Chris99

  • Posts: 29
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #40 on: October 16, 2015, 06:53 PM »
Here's my sled. A little rudimentary but works well - I wish I saw this thread before making it :)


Offline Wuffles

  • Posts: 1313
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #41 on: November 09, 2015, 05:15 PM »
Right, I'm back. Nothing better to do tonight than to try and find some UHMW tape from somewhere. Seems there's a shortage of people in the UK selling it - as far as I can tell.

eBay shows a bloke in Poland selling it in USD and then the rest of the Free World over the pond wanting to sell it cheap but with $50 delivery.

Anyone have any ideas where to get it in the UK? I'm looking at you @Ed Bray
Tool list updated to reflect knowledge :: hammer, screwdriver, one pozi bit, and another bigger hammer.

Offline Ed Bray

  • Posts: 411
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #42 on: November 09, 2015, 05:27 PM »
I got my UHMWPE tape from the chap in Poland, it's very expensive in the UK.

I bought my sheet stuff from here: http://www.uhmwpesheet.co.uk/

Offline Wuffles

  • Posts: 1313
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #43 on: November 09, 2015, 05:36 PM »
Yep, I took your advice and got my sheets from there before. I'll do the same as you on the Polish fella.
Tool list updated to reflect knowledge :: hammer, screwdriver, one pozi bit, and another bigger hammer.

Offline Mavrik

  • Posts: 240
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #44 on: May 29, 2016, 02:13 PM »
I want to upgrade my sled to run on linear bearings on metal rods.

But now the suppliers want to know what size rods & bearings.

And I have no idea.
10mm? 16mm? 20mm?

I'm wanting to use my big router which is 6.1 kg and have a span of the short side of my MFT table.

What size rods & bearings do I go for?

Sent from my SM-G920F using Tapatalk

TS55, MFT 1080, PS300, EHL 65, Domino, OF 1010, CTL 22, RO 125, BS75

Offline SoulStealer52

  • Posts: 1
Re: Router planing sled
« Reply #45 on: April 08, 2018, 06:50 PM »
Would you shares your drawings with measurements of this sled, I would like to make me one.