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Author Topic: 110v Range  (Read 15044 times)

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Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
110v Range
« on: December 03, 2015, 06:51 AM »
Hi Guys,

I've spent a few hours browsing the web and FOG trying to find a solution to my problem and although some people seem to experience some similar issues, I haven't been able to find a conclusive solution.

So, for many years now I seem to have predominantly been using Makita tools and the odd Dewalt. Not for any particular reason, just that I have never had any problems with them and they seem to last a long long time. I still use there 18v range daily now. However, I have recently been drawn in by the powers of Festool and being a kitchen fitter, my first two purchases were the CTM AC 36 extractor and the TS 55 plunge saw (both 110v).

I was very pleased with how these looked and the engineering of them. However, since I've started using them I have had nothing but frustration. I have a 3.3KVA transformer and usually do not use any extension lead...I just plug the extractor straight into the tranny. Between them, there is a max running wattage of 2400w, which should easily be within the transformers limits. I understand that the startup wattage for powertools is greater than the running wattage but as there is a delayed start on the vac, i don't think this will be the problem. Whenever I use the saw to cut 38mm chipboard worktops, running off of the extractor, I have to do it in two cuts else the blade will stop due to lack of power. I have also tried to turn the power of the extractor right down but it doesn't seem to make a difference.

I've already messaged Festool about it and one of their guys rang me back a few days later saying that I should purchase a new blade with less teeth and run the saw at a slow speed. He also said that this is a common issue with Festool and I should purchase a 5kva transformer which should help.

I'm not happy with this response at all. Having spent around £1000 on two 'premium brand' power tools, I don't expect these problems and certainly don't want to have to purchase additional equipment at a greater cost. I didn't have these problems with my old Dewalt plunge saw. I was looking at buying the OF2200 router but being a higher wattage than the TS55, i guess that I have no chance of using this without problems.

It's also worth mentioning that another kitchen fitter that I work with also uses a lot of Festool stuff including a 110v TS 55 & a CTL extractor. He also has the same problems on 110v using a 5.5kva generator and is talking about sticking his stuff on ebay and converting back to Dewalt. He went to the last Festool show in the UK and spoke to one of the reps there, who told him (being honest) to stay away from the Festool 110v stuff as they always seem to have the problems crop up. He said that the tools are mainly designed for those people working in clean workshops on 240v.

Can anyone shed any light on this please and end my frustration? Surely a high end brand like Festool wouldn't put up for sale 110v tools that perform this badly? If I can't find a solution then i'm left with no choice other than to sell up and get Makita/Dewalt that I know will work but i'd rather avoid the massive expense!

Thanks guys [fingers crossed]

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Offline chris s

  • Posts: 105
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2015, 08:40 AM »
I thought the UK was 220, if so why do you use 110 tools with a transformer? My guess is the transformer is some how affecting the saw. I have run into this problem while traveling and using transformers to lower to 110volts. I think it is not the actual motor, rather the electronics that control it.  Chris

Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2015, 09:07 AM »
Hi Chris. Yes you are right, the UK is usually 240v but on construction sites we are only usually allowed to use 110v tools for 'health and safety' reasons. This has been like this ever since long before my time. Due to this Festool along with all the other big tool brands sell 240v & 110v tool. The 110v ones have to be used with either a transformer or 110v generator, there is no other means. With every other 110v tool that I have ever used, this has never been a problem...This is why I am so frustrated with Festool at the moment.

Offline Nippychippy

  • Posts: 507
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2015, 01:09 PM »
Hi Darren I have had similar issues also but with a dewalt table saw. I also have tried the ts55 on 110v and 240v the 240v is more power full. That s why I have half and half

Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2015, 01:20 PM »
thanks for the reply mate. Seems like it's a common problem with the Festool 110v stuff then. As I have to use 110v only, I guess I have no other option but to sell up and switch to other brands like Makita, Dewalt or bosch. That's a load of money wasted though...Thanks Festool!

Offline Wuffles

  • Posts: 1313
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2015, 01:27 PM »
thanks for the reply mate. Seems like it's a common problem with the Festool 110v stuff then. As I have to use 110v only, I guess I have no other option but to sell up and switch to other brands like Makita, Dewalt or bosch. That's a load of money wasted though...Thanks Festool!

Had it longer than 15 days?
Tool list updated to reflect knowledge :: hammer, screwdriver, one pozi bit, and another bigger hammer.

Offline bigred00

  • Posts: 30
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2015, 01:33 PM »
The 240-110 step down is one thing but does the tool deal with the frequency difference? US 110V is at 60Hz while UK 220/240 runs at 50Hz. That reduction in Hz would reduce the speed of your tools if not electronically governed. Not sure if they sell US 110V in the UK or a Europe 110V version.

My 110V tools in the US are all marked for 60Hz. If I ever move home to Ireland I'll probably have to sell the lot because of this.

Offline Phil Beckley

  • Festool Employee
  • *
  • Posts: 1483
  • Ask the question, and get the discussion going...
    • youtube - Festool U.K
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2015, 01:52 PM »
Hi Guys,

I've spent a few hours browsing the web and FOG trying to find a solution to my problem and although some people seem to experience some similar issues, I haven't been able to find a conclusive solution.

So, for many years now I seem to have predominantly been using Makita tools and the odd Dewalt. Not for any particular reason, just that I have never had any problems with them and they seem to last a long long time. I still use there 18v range daily now. However, I have recently been drawn in by the powers of Festool and being a kitchen fitter, my first two purchases were the CTM AC 36 extractor and the TS 55 plunge saw (both 110v).

I was very pleased with how these looked and the engineering of them. However, since I've started using them I have had nothing but frustration. I have a 3.3KVA transformer and usually do not use any extension lead...I just plug the extractor straight into the tranny. Between them, there is a max running wattage of 2400w, which should easily be within the transformers limits. I understand that the startup wattage for powertools is greater than the running wattage but as there is a delayed start on the vac, i don't think this will be the problem. Whenever I use the saw to cut 38mm chipboard worktops, running off of the extractor, I have to do it in two cuts else the blade will stop due to lack of power. I have also tried to turn the power of the extractor right down but it doesn't seem to make a difference.

I've already messaged Festool about it and one of their guys rang me back a few days later saying that I should purchase a new blade with less teeth and run the saw at a slow speed. He also said that this is a common issue with Festool and I should purchase a 5kva transformer which should help.

I'm not happy with this response at all. Having spent around £1000 on two 'premium brand' power tools, I don't expect these problems and certainly don't want to have to purchase additional equipment at a greater cost. I didn't have these problems with my old Dewalt plunge saw. I was looking at buying the OF2200 router but being a higher wattage than the TS55, i guess that I have no chance of using this without problems.

It's also worth mentioning that another kitchen fitter that I work with also uses a lot of Festool stuff including a 110v TS 55 & a CTL extractor. He also has the same problems on 110v using a 5.5kva generator and is talking about sticking his stuff on ebay and converting back to Dewalt. He went to the last Festool show in the UK and spoke to one of the reps there, who told him (being honest) to stay away from the Festool 110v stuff as they always seem to have the problems crop up. He said that the tools are mainly designed for those people working in clean workshops on 240v.

Can anyone shed any light on this please and end my frustration? Surely a high end brand like Festool wouldn't put up for sale 110v tools that perform this badly? If I can't find a solution then i'm left with no choice other than to sell up and get Makita/Dewalt that I know will work but i'd rather avoid the massive expense!

Thanks guys [fingers crossed]

Hi
I have sent a P.M to you.
The blade part I do not follow either - 48t supplied with the saw for worktop is correct as long as in good condition. The Kva part is correct for 110v - the higher the better basically. The other possibility is a gremlin in the electronics.
rg
Phil
Festool U.K Employee | Festool UK Website


Offline joiner1970

  • Posts: 3218
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2015, 02:14 PM »
I've been using 110v Festool stuff since 2007 and yes sometimes it does feel under powered. It does work better on a bigger transformer but for cutting 18mm sheet material it should be fine on a 3.3kva one.

I must admit when I've used the makita 110v saw it feels much more powerful but I don't like the feel or quality of it.

I also do a lot of kitchens and never struggle that much cutting the tops. I use a midi though and sometimes it's better to plug the saw in separately rather than off the vac.

Stick with it or try the mafell saw as I've heard their saw is good.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2017, 10:09 AM by joiner1970 »

Offline Jbmccombe

  • Posts: 43
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2015, 02:27 PM »
What happens if you just plug in the saw without the extractor to see if it is a total load issue?

Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2015, 02:48 PM »


Had it longer than 15 days?
[/quote]

I'm afraid so mate...A few months now.

Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2015, 02:51 PM »
The 240-110 step down is one thing but does the tool deal with the frequency difference? US 110V is at 60Hz while UK 220/240 runs at 50Hz. That reduction in Hz would reduce the speed of your tools if not electronically governed. Not sure if they sell US 110V in the UK or a Europe 110V version.

My 110V tools in the US are all marked for 60Hz. If I ever move home to Ireland I'll probably have to sell the lot because of this.

I think you're right mate but if the tools over here are sold as UK 110v with a UK plug on, then you would expect them to work appropriately, and with the Festool price tag you would expect them to out-perform many cheaper tools.

Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2015, 02:58 PM »
I've been using 110v Festool stuff since 2007 and yes sometimes it does feel under powered. It does work better on a bigger transformer but for cutting 18mm sheet material it should be fine on a 3.3kva one.

I must admit when I've used the makita 110v saw it feels much more powerful but I don't like the feel or quality of it.

I also do a lot of kitchens and never struggle that much cutting the tops. I use a midi though and sometimes it's better to plug the saw in separately rather than off the vac.

Stick with it or try the mafell saw as I've heard they're saw is good.

I see what your saying and of course I could lug about a heavy 5kva transformer and bypass the extractor when plugging the saw and router in but I was buying Festool tools hoping to upgrade my tools and make me more productive. I don't think it's acceptable spending this much more money for a Festool saw/extractor/router when in actual fact it will make you less productive and you will not be able to use all of the features that are advertised (such as the extractors auto start/stop).

I'm still hoping that there is a simple logical fix/solution because at the moment it seems too unbelievable. I appreciate the feedback though mate!

Offline joiner1970

  • Posts: 3218
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2015, 03:14 PM »
As I say I've used Festool stuff since 2007 and over all I'm happy with it. I do however use lots of other brands too.

Offline jmbfestool

  • Posts: 6625
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2015, 03:57 PM »
Darren,

I have said it many times on Fog.

110v tools are less powerful but festool are really bad for it.

My mate bought the TS55 110v and when I use his it's extremely underpowered.

I hate using his. I'm totally 240v and my TS55 has loads of power.

My other work mate didn't own a track saw but wanted one. He's all on 110v but after using mine and my mates 110v he didn't want to get it in 110v but because all his tools are 110v he wanted to stick with 110v.

So he looked at mafel track saw and it has slightly more power on spec. So he took the gamble and bought the mafel in the hope that having a more powerful motor it will be okay on 110v.

Well the  mafel was  a lot better on 110v.  I've used his mafel saw and it has plenty of power.  We even used the TS55 110v and mafel 110v on same transformer and the mafel has more power.

So buy 240v festool avoid 110v festool.

I don't know with mafel but festool tools especially the kapex don't like generators.

I went to a job to fit skirting and the job had a small generator.

The generator was at the front of the house and I ran a lead inside.

Plugged my kapex in and....... Nothing!! It wouldn't work.  Lasers turned on but no power.

At first I thought my kapex was broken or my lead.  So I got another lead out and tried again.

Nope nothing.  So I decided to drag the generator round the back of the house ( don't ask me why I didn't disassemble my kapex and take  my kapex to the generator )
I kinda thought if the kapex was plugged directly into the generator it would work.

So after finally dragging the bloody generator round and plugging my kapex into it direct thinking yep I'll be on my way now..... Nope nothing wouldn't work.

So I ended up calling my mate who luckily didn't need his chopsaw on his job dropped his dewalt chopsaw off. 

Plugged it in and it worked perfectly!!!

So the entire day I was gutted because I thought my kapex was broken and it needed to go for repair.

Soon as I got  home I plugged my kapex into socket and yes!!! Kapex works!! Few!!!

So I called festool and I was told some generators don't produce clean enough electricity so the kapex electronics won't let the kapex start.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2015, 01:46 AM by jmbfestool »
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Offline luke1984

  • Posts: 146
  • A whole lot of green
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2015, 05:03 PM »
All my festool is 110v and I have no issue now. ( I did in the past) I had an old 8 year old 3.3 tranny. Tools started to become under powered. Spoke to a sparky and he said my tranny was starting to wear/ burn out. Didn't know they could. So went to a job of mine and ther was a plasterer with a brand new tranny.  So plugged my extractor in and power was better. So next day went and got a 4 kva tranny. Not as big or heavy as a 5 but never had a problem since. And I sometimes run a 25m lead then my midi. I plug my of2200 and kapex in to my midi. No problem. Do find a 50 m lead is a bit under powered. Hope this helps. Luke
« Last Edit: December 03, 2015, 05:06 PM by luke1984 »

Offline VW MICK

  • Posts: 881
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2015, 05:31 PM »
Darren

All my festools are 110v I don't have a problem with any of them (I run them all from a 5.5kva transformer in my shed I've a 110v ring wired in using the 32amp socket)

I've probably 10 guys on my site with TS55,s all 110v never had a problem with any

Sorry I know that's prob not much help

Offline jimbo51

  • Posts: 437
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2015, 11:08 PM »
Someone who travels from the UK to the US or Canada should bring along their 110v TS55. We could see how it cuts on the 110v house current we have over here. A comparison of the North American TS55 and a UK TS 55 could also be informative. They only differ in the 50 vs 60 cycle rating which should result in the UK saw perhaps running faster (?). The power rating should be the same I assume.

If the UK saw performs better in NA than with the transformer back in the UK, then the electronics are likely the problem. 

Offline ifit

  • Posts: 228
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2015, 02:32 AM »
My experience is it is more to do with the quality of the supply than the power
My kapex never ran that well and would not run at all on a generator until i bought a sinewave generator 2600w and it runs better on that than on a transformer
I changed my transformer from an old 3.3kva to a new one of them round 3.3kva ones and it does run better on that

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5292
  • Does Anyone Know What Time It Is?
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2015, 05:30 AM »
Darren,

As a yank who is working in the UK and brought all my 110v festools with me.

I use a 3.3kv tranny to power my tools.

 I'd say their is something wrong with your tranny or connections etc.

 I run all my tools using either my 110v ct 26 or 22 with my , kapex , TS 75 in  the CMS cutting 2" thick green oak and everything else Plus the 2200 under load making full debth cuts,  sanders I even ran my 13" 110v delta thicknesser running green oak through it.

I've not had the problem you described.

There must something else going on wiring, tranny etc.

Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #20 on: December 07, 2015, 12:16 PM »
Darren,

I have said it many times on Fog.

110v tools are less powerful but festool are really bad for it.

My mate bought the TS55 110v and when I use his it's extremely underpowered.

I hate using his. I'm totally 240v and my TS55 has loads of power.

My other work mate didn't own a track saw but wanted one. He's all on 110v but after using mine and my mates 110v he didn't want to get it in 110v but because all his tools are 110v he wanted to stick with 110v.

So he looked at mafel track saw and it has slightly more power on spec. So he took the gamble and bought the mafel in the hope that having a more powerful motor it will be okay on 110v.

Well the  mafel was  a lot better on 110v.  I've used his mafel saw and it has plenty of power.  We even used the TS55 110v and mafel 110v on same transformer and the mafel has more power.

So buy 240v festool avoid 110v festool.

I don't know with mafel but festool tools especially the kapex don't like generators.

I went to a job to fit skirting and the job had a small generator.

The generator was at the front of the house and I ran a lead inside.

Plugged my kapex in and....... Nothing!! It wouldn't work.  Lasers turned on but no power.

At first I thought my kapex was broken or my lead.  So I got another lead out and tried again.

Nope nothing.  So I decided to drag the generator round the back of the house ( don't ask me why I didn't disassemble my kapex and take  my kapex to the generator )
I kinda thought if the kapex was plugged directly into the generator it would work.

So after finally dragging the bloody generator round and plugging my kapex into it direct thinking yep I'll be on my way now..... Nope nothing wouldn't work.

So I ended up calling my mate who luckily didn't need his chopsaw on his job dropped his dewalt chopsaw off. 

Plugged it in and it worked perfectly!!!

So the entire day I was gutted because I thought my kapex was broken and it needed to go for repair.

Soon as I got  home I plugged my kapex into socket and yes!!! Kapex works!! Few!!!

So I called festool and I was told some generators don't produce clean enough electricity so the kapex electronics won't let the kapex start.

Yep, that's the general impression that I'm getting. I just wished I'd have known before spending all of that money and wasting so much time trying to get around the problem. Thanks for the info!

Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #21 on: December 07, 2015, 12:19 PM »
All my festool is 110v and I have no issue now. ( I did in the past) I had an old 8 year old 3.3 tranny. Tools started to become under powered. Spoke to a sparky and he said my tranny was starting to wear/ burn out. Didn't know they could. So went to a job of mine and ther was a plasterer with a brand new tranny.  So plugged my extractor in and power was better. So next day went and got a 4 kva tranny. Not as big or heavy as a 5 but never had a problem since. And I sometimes run a 25m lead then my midi. I plug my of2200 and kapex in to my midi. No problem. Do find a 50 m lead is a bit under powered. Hope this helps. Luke

Thanks Luke, that's good to know. It may still be a pain for me though because I quite often have to run off of a genny as some sites won't have any power nearby to plug into   :-\

Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #22 on: December 07, 2015, 12:22 PM »
Darren

All my festools are 110v I don't have a problem with any of them (I run them all from a 5.5kva transformer in my shed I've a 110v ring wired in using the 32amp socket)

I've probably 10 guys on my site with TS55,s all 110v never had a problem with any

Sorry I know that's prob not much help

Thanks mate. It's not really feasible for me to lug about a 5kva tranny though as those things way a ton don't they. Plus, it's still frustrating because a 3.3kva tranny should be fine with a load of about 2800watts (i forget the exact calculation). Plus, my mate has a dewalt 110v track saw which has plenty of power and cost a fraction of the price.

Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #23 on: December 07, 2015, 12:23 PM »
Someone who travels from the UK to the US or Canada should bring along their 110v TS55. We could see how it cuts on the 110v house current we have over here. A comparison of the North American TS55 and a UK TS 55 could also be informative. They only differ in the 50 vs 60 cycle rating which should result in the UK saw perhaps running faster (?). The power rating should be the same I assume.

If the UK saw performs better in NA than with the transformer back in the UK, then the electronics are likely the problem.

that would be interesting!

Offline Darren653

  • Posts: 15
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #24 on: December 07, 2015, 12:33 PM »
Darren,

As a yank who is working in the UK and brought all my 110v festools with me.

I use a 3.3kv tranny to power my tools.

 I'd say their is something wrong with your tranny or connections etc.

 I run all my tools using either my 110v ct 26 or 22 with my , kapex , TS 75 in  the CMS cutting 2" thick green oak and everything else Plus the 2200 under load making full debth cuts,  sanders I even ran my 13" 110v delta thicknesser running green oak through it.

I've not had the problem you described.

There must something else going on wiring, tranny etc.

I hope so as that would make things a lot easier for me if i could just replace the tranny for example. The only problem is that it would mean that my transformer, my mates transformer, my generator and his generator (all of which are different brands) are all faulty...

Offline luke1984

  • Posts: 146
  • A whole lot of green
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #25 on: December 07, 2015, 01:28 PM »
I run a 2.7 kva genie and it fine just as long as I plug my midi directly. I run my kapex and of2200. Not as power full as the mains but still both cut fine.

Offline andyman

  • Posts: 630
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #26 on: December 07, 2015, 06:11 PM »
Hi Guys,

I've spent a few hours browsing the web and FOG trying to find a solution to my problem and although some people seem to experience some similar issues, I haven't been able to find a conclusive solution.

So, for many years now I seem to have predominantly been using Makita tools and the odd Dewalt. Not for any particular reason, just that I have never had any problems with them and they seem to last a long long time. I still use there 18v range daily now. However, I have recently been drawn in by the powers of Festool and being a kitchen fitter, my first two purchases were the CTM AC 36 extractor and the TS 55 plunge saw (both 110v).

I was very pleased with how these looked and the engineering of them. However, since I've started using them I have had nothing but frustration. I have a 3.3KVA transformer and usually do not use any extension lead...I just plug the extractor straight into the tranny. Between them, there is a max running wattage of 2400w, which should easily be within the transformers limits. I understand that the startup wattage for powertools is greater than the running wattage but as there is a delayed start on the vac, i don't think this will be the problem. Whenever I use the saw to cut 38mm chipboard worktops, running off of the extractor, I have to do it in two cuts else the blade will stop due to lack of power. I have also tried to turn the power of the extractor right down but it doesn't seem to make a difference.

I've already messaged Festool about it and one of their guys rang me back a few days later saying that I should purchase a new blade with less teeth and run the saw at a slow speed. He also said that this is a common issue with Festool and I should purchase a 5kva transformer which should help.

I'm not happy with this response at all. Having spent around £1000 on two 'premium brand' power tools, I don't expect these problems and certainly don't want to have to purchase additional equipment at a greater cost. I didn't have these problems with my old Dewalt plunge saw. I was looking at buying the OF2200 router but being a higher wattage than the TS55, i guess that I have no chance of using this without problems.

It's also worth mentioning that another kitchen fitter that I work with also uses a lot of Festool stuff including a 110v TS 55 & a CTL extractor. He also has the same problems on 110v using a 5.5kva generator and is talking about sticking his stuff on ebay and converting back to Dewalt. He went to the last Festool show in the UK and spoke to one of the reps there, who told him (being honest) to stay away from the Festool 110v stuff as they always seem to have the problems crop up. He said that the tools are mainly designed for those people working in clean workshops on 240v.

Can anyone shed any light on this please and end my frustration? Surely a high end brand like Festool wouldn't put up for sale 110v tools that perform this badly? If I can't find a solution then i'm left with no choice other than to sell up and get Makita/Dewalt that I know will work but i'd rather avoid the massive expense!

Thanks guys [fingers crossed]
my midi and ts55 trip 2 of my 3.3kv transformers all the time drives me nuts was also looking at a bigger transformer but really don't want the extra weight.
I do wonder as both trannys are few years old now

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7651
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2015, 11:35 PM »
I do wonder as both trannys are few years old now

@andyman

I think when your trannys are old enough you should just let them leave home and do their own thing [wink]

Online Bohdan

  • Posts: 889
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #28 on: December 08, 2015, 01:35 AM »
I think that one problem that everybody is missing is that is that there are tranformers that are rated at 3.3KW but in fact they are not designed to supply clean power at that rating. This is primarily controlled by the size of the iron core. Any smaller sized transformer can supply 3.3KW however with a much larger harmonic distortion. This distortion may affect the saws electronics and prevent proper functioning.

The excess load can cause overheating and failure but the unit may be robust enough to survive this. The designer of the transformer may not have considered dirty power would be a problem when he over-rated his design.

@Darren653
The only way to be certain is to look at the waveform with a CRO or to measure the distortion while under load, however I feel that that is outside the common abilities of most chippies, so I would suggest that a chat with a friendly electronics technician may shed some light on your problem.

Another possible solution is to find a 3.3KV transformer that someone has that works and buy that identical brand and model but you may find that it is a much heavier unit.

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 4010
Re: 110v Range
« Reply #29 on: December 08, 2015, 01:44 AM »
I think that one problem that everybody is missing is that is that there are tranformers that are rated at 3.3KW but in fact they are not designed to supply clean power at that rating. This is primarily controlled by the size of the iron core. Any smaller sized transformer can supply 3.3KW however with a much larger harmonic distortion. This distortion may affect the saws electronics and prevent proper functioning.
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So with only powering the lasers one would think that the load must be well under 3.3kw.
I could envision it starting and if it was not a soft start then spitting the dummy.
Or running but in a hard cut going towards the 3.3kW and spitting it.
But not powering on does not make a lot of sense.
Or if the transformer was a switching device with tones of harmonics then it makes sense, but an old school transformer would have the identical signal coming out as going it and be linear for a long range towards full load.

I am pretty much like @jobsworth by background, except I have embraced 220/230 and will use dedicated sockets when/if in the US.
All the 230 tools are then available none of the FT, Mirka, Mafell issues with 110v tools not working as well are averted.