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Author Topic: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.  (Read 95512 times)

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Offline Jaybolishes

  • Posts: 396
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #270 on: January 27, 2019, 09:10 PM »
There isn’t anything different in the new kapex motor. It’s the same motor. If someone buys the new one just cross your fingers and roll the dice and enjoy it for the 3 year warranty while you’re covered.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2019, 09:13 PM by Jaybolishes »

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Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1136
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #271 on: January 27, 2019, 10:16 PM »
A $1500 CMS for trim work only? I would become the town's laughing stock if I told my woodworking friends that was what I bought a Kapex for! It must have been an ill-prepared response on the part of the Festool service fellow.

I wish Festool did come up with a new motor for its new Kapex and that the new motor could be installed in the old generation of Kapex. I would have been willing to pay to have the new motor installed -- removing the cloud of worry on my saw once and for all.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6110
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #272 on: January 27, 2019, 11:04 PM »
There isn’t anything different in the new kapex motor. It’s the same motor. If someone buys the new one just cross your fingers and roll the dice and enjoy it for the 3 year warranty while you’re covered.

And how do you know this? It hasn’t been released yet in the states and the new Kapex still hasn’t been entered into Ekat.

Even when it’s entered into Ekat, the part numbers may or may not be significant.

Just curious as to your insight on this because I’m also a Kapex owner.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 530
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #273 on: January 27, 2019, 11:52 PM »
I wonder if the poster was commenting on the repaired unit having same motor as it would have had before it failed.

As you say, we know nothing about the new one.  Even if the motor was 100% the same one, you can be sure Festool would give it a different PN just so people can't say it's the same motor.   Reality though is I don't think anyone thinks the new one will be the same motor. I would lean more towards Festool spec'd a motor that will run fine even if it's down to like 80V, pulling 25A.  They know it will be a bad day if the new one starts killing motors.

Offline onevw

  • Posts: 84
  • its mostly carbon
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #274 on: January 29, 2019, 08:47 AM »


I have a Kapex but do not use it for heavy work.
It does look as though Festool just designed this saw for light use and did not design any extra protection in the system for work past the light use design.

One good thing is this post has not been deleted by Festool yet, so too cover up any problems with this saw.

This looks like a need for damage control at the executive level. The Germans to not do this very well. It's like never admitting defeat and pushing the problem off to the customer. Just look at BMW, VW, Audi, and some others.

This lack of company control is a problem with the controlling directors of the company and lack of control does have negative impact on the BRAND.

As a X owner when I found out we had generated this type of problem Instant forced terminations took place to save our investment in our BRAND.
 
What do you all think?

FYI

I own and use many Festool products for personal use 25 systainer's so far, but in business use we try not to buy it and look for USA/UK Machines tools. We have found these systems can be pushed past the design limits.



Rick

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 530
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #275 on: January 29, 2019, 10:07 AM »
While many would agree with you, it will still keep coming down to the matter that we will never know how many saws had issues. It very well may be a small number of them or some specific use case/environment.  So it's easy to go after Festool, but they very well could be just as baffled as users, and it could also be a very small percentage of sales.  Internet has been good/bad here.  It allows people to find stuff out that they never could before, thus companies pushing really bad products do get filtered. At the same time it can cause a small issues on a small number of units to look like a massive problem when it's not.

If it was an easy fix, Festool would have done a running change long ago and moved on.  So they very well don't know why they fail. This happens, I have seen in my career folks chase an issue and apply changes, beef stuff up, etc and it didn't fix it, simply because the issue was something far more nuanced then it looked like on face value.  Products end up with these issues because of this. They made it through testing in development because the testing, design specs, etc don't account for on obscure condition in the design space. The same process that has been used for decades with no issues for some reason didn't catch something this time.

This is why I suspect we will see a motor beefed up in all ways on the new model, with the hope of covering it even if they might not fully understand the issue.

We also take folks on their word of what they were doing/have done with their saws when they failed. I hope most people are honest, but human nature is always there and people will tone down their actions even if they have no idea they are.  More than a few saws have probably died when the user was doing something clearly bad for it, but that doesn't mean others didn't do everything right and it failed.


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6110
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #276 on: January 29, 2019, 11:29 AM »

Just look at BMW, VW, Audi, and some others.


Rather reminds me of the Audi unintended acceleration issues in the late 70's and early 80's. It's literally taken Audi 20+ years to claw their way back from that debacle.  [eek]

https://www.autosafety.org/audi-sudden-acceleration/

Offline vkumar

  • Posts: 382
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #277 on: January 29, 2019, 12:01 PM »
I accept what you say @DeformedTree , that sometimes it is hard to find the root cause of failures.  However you do not find competitive saws from Dewalt, Milwaukee, Ridgid, Makita, Hitachi failing, since these saws outsell Festool by a good margin I would guess that even a small number of failures would be blown out of proportion. Their users have the same exposure to the internet just like Festool does.  Look at the number of youtube videos on these saws.  Perhaps it is the speed control which these saws lack is the culprit, or what Festool has to do to the motor windings to achieve speed control. There is also the culture behind that does not accept blame (witness Audi in the eighties with sudden acceleration, VW recently with dieselgate, Takata airbags and so on). I too have an extensive product development background and feel that Festool has not done enough to make this problem go away.


While many would agree with you, it will still keep coming down to the matter that we will never know how many saws had issues. It very well may be a small number of them or some specific use case/environment.  So it's easy to go after Festool, but they very well could be just as baffled as users, and it could also be a very small percentage of sales.  Internet has been good/bad here.  It allows people to find stuff out that they never could before, thus companies pushing really bad products do get filtered. At the same time it can cause a small issues on a small number of units to look like a massive problem when it's not.

If it was an easy fix, Festool would have done a running change long ago and moved on.  So they very well don't know why they fail. This happens, I have seen in my career folks chase an issue and apply changes, beef stuff up, etc and it didn't fix it, simply because the issue was something far more nuanced then it looked like on face value.  Products end up with these issues because of this. They made it through testing in development because the testing, design specs, etc don't account for on obscure condition in the design space. The same process that has been used for decades with no issues for some reason didn't catch something this time.

This is why I suspect we will see a motor beefed up in all ways on the new model, with the hope of covering it even if they might not fully understand the issue.

We also take folks on their word of what they were doing/have done with their saws when they failed. I hope most people are honest, but human nature is always there and people will tone down their actions even if they have no idea they are.  More than a few saws have probably died when the user was doing something clearly bad for it, but that doesn't mean others didn't do everything right and it failed.
Vijay Kumar

Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 290
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #278 on: January 29, 2019, 02:38 PM »
Perhaps Festool needs to rebrand the Kapex SCMS as the Kapex DTMS (Dainty Trim Molding Saw) so that users don't try crazy stuff like crosscutting a 2x4 or a piece of hardwood lumber that might strain it beyond its intended use?

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 806
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #279 on: January 29, 2019, 04:28 PM »
I ordered the replacement parts for mine as I like the saw. Mine lasted the better part of 7 or so years with moderate use. I did some looking before I ordered, but could not find anything I liked better.

Offline Rollin22Petes

  • Posts: 191
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #280 on: January 29, 2019, 08:26 PM »
I'm sure my Kapex was repaired with the same motor as all the previous 4 that have burned up. I would like to think with Festool coming out with a new model they would have addressed the motor issue as  they are well aware of it. I'm sure if they did they'll never acknowledge it so I guess only time will tell. It really sucks I like the saw a lot and would buy another I'm just not willing to take a $1500 gamble.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 530
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #281 on: January 29, 2019, 09:42 PM »
I accept what you say @DeformedTree , that sometimes it is hard to find the root cause of failures.  However you do not find competitive saws from Dewalt, Milwaukee, Ridgid, Makita, Hitachi failing, since these saws outsell Festool by a good margin I would guess that even a small number of failures would be blown out of proportion. Their users have the same exposure to the internet just like Festool does.  Look at the number of youtube videos on these saws.  Perhaps it is the speed control which these saws lack is the culprit, or what Festool has to do to the motor windings to achieve speed control. There is also the culture behind that does not accept blame (witness Audi in the eighties with sudden acceleration, VW recently with dieselgate, Takata airbags and so on). I too have an extensive product development background and feel that Festool has not done enough to make this problem go away.


Part of the issue is it's not like you are talking about a recall issue, no one can get hurt with it, or property burnt to the ground, etc. So a recall won't happen. It would come down to the company deciding they want to fix them.  Then you have a whole knew issue, everyone will turn around and want their saw replaced even when its working fine.  Then the next time some people have a tool fail on them, they will demand another recall for that tool, Pandora's box is now open.  The best case is they find the root cause and a fix that they implement at the factory and any tools that get returned for repair gets fixed, eventually all is good.  This doesn't look to be happening since we aren't seeing new PNs for the bits.  So that tells us that either there is no easy/cheap fix or they just don't understand the problem after this time.  If the cost of repairing dead saws or potential loss of sales is less than the cost of implementing a more intensive fix, then they aren't going to change things.  But since there has been no "R" model where they change the design and don't say anything (like the change to the TS55 so it doesn't have the garbage tilt lock design), this again would generically point to they don't know the root cause of the failure.

I doubt they haven't tried to solve it.  It probably has some relation to the speed control and features other saws do not have.  It's probably something in the more dark arts of engineering.  EMI, electrical harmonics, vibration, timing of switching, something causing unanticipated in-rush currents in specific conditions, etc.  Stuff that is just really hard to work out.  And since the tools that fail are being used in different countries than they are in, it becomes really hard to see what it happening when it fails. I won't be surprised if they simply haven't been able to reproduce the failure.  And to be fair to them, if you simply can't reproduces a failure, it's near impossible to solve the problem.  Some industries eventually send people out in the field to observe product being used, which often identifies the problem very quickly as there was key info not being conveyed.  "upon visiting customer, it was observed owner, spouse and adult live at home children all weigh over 400lbs, premature transmission failure may be result of constant 2000lb occupancy load in car no previously reported".   This sort of on site observation is going to be very hard with hobbyist or professionals working within other peoples homes, and being part way around the world.

There is no way that they haven't tried to solve this.  But if no one has seen new PNs (revisions) in EKAT, and tools come back with the same model parts, its pretty clear they either don't have a change that can be implemented in the current product, or they simply haven't been able to solve it.  No enterprising person is buying up dead kapex and implementing their repair and selling them for a profit that we know of, so it doesn't look like outsiders can figure it out.

This of course makes a new Kapex interesting, since if they don't know what went wrong, they might not be able to avoid the same issue.  It's hard to go after any company to hard when there is an issue they can't figure out and no one else has an answer too. This happens, there are products out there in the world with failure modes the manufactures simply don't understand why/how. They tend to result to the problem dying out, or work around to prevent the mode from happening where they can (which often cause complaints by folks who are now mad the product doesn't work the same). 

This isn't like them not offering a tool in a country, or stop making things, or their removal of metric tools. Those are things that are active choices by them. When a company makes these sorts of tools for decades and they work, and one tool has a problem, it's clearly not that they aren't competent, or have proper processes, sometimes they are just stuck.

Now if years from now we learn they have known the exact issues and how to fix it and it's cheap and easy but they just don't want to, that will be bad.  I doubt we are looking at a Remington 700 series rifle trigger with a design flaw known for decades and they just didn't want to spend the few bucks to fix it.

For sure if the new Kapex has the same issues, their issues will be large.  But of course they might just discontinue the 110V model if that happens.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6110
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #282 on: January 29, 2019, 10:00 PM »
For sure if the new Kapex has the same issues, their issues will be large.  But of course they might just discontinue the 110V model if that happens.

Well if that’s the case, they’ll also have to discontinue the 230/240 volt model that they’ve also had issues with.

Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 290
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #283 on: January 30, 2019, 08:34 AM »

For sure if the new Kapex has the same issues, their issues will be large.  But of course they might just discontinue the 110V model if that happens.

Yes, perhaps it's time for Festool to admit that it does not possess the engineering skills to produce tools that work in the context they are used.  Imagine Mercedes Benz deciding to leave the North American market because the use conditions are different there than in Europe.  Instead they do what every other global business does and they institute engineering design, development and validation processes that ensure that their products work well and are durable in all market conditions where they are sold.  What a concept!

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 530
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #284 on: January 30, 2019, 09:00 PM »

For sure if the new Kapex has the same issues, their issues will be large.  But of course they might just discontinue the 110V model if that happens.

Yes, perhaps it's time for Festool to admit that it does not possess the engineering skills to produce tools that work in the context they are used.  Imagine Mercedes Benz deciding to leave the North American market because the use conditions are different there than in Europe.  Instead they do what every other global business does and they institute engineering design, development and validation processes that ensure that their products work well and are durable in all market conditions where they are sold.  What a concept!

Car companies do leave and or never enter the US market because they don't want to re-design certify for the US market.  Many sprinter van owners would tell you Mercedes shouldn't have tried in the US market as they clearly didn't want to design to handle salted roads, those things dissolved instantly.  Non-US car makes have a history of not designing cars to work in the US/N.A. market which leads to problems, discontinuing models, damaged reputation, and abandoning the market, or redesigning vehicles heavily where they become US only models.  Even the US based companies do this where they have completely different models for the US as the global models often would not work here. And a lot of the US models are never sold elsewhere.  Not much purpose for a Ford Raptor in the Netherlands.

Offline Coen

  • Posts: 445
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #285 on: January 30, 2019, 10:42 PM »
And a lot of the US models are never sold elsewhere.  Not much purpose for a Ford Raptor in the Netherlands.

Well, we have the taxes in such a way that if you drive around in a tank, you will pay for it... As a consequence less supersized cars and safer traffic. US cars also lagged behind in gas mileage bigtime for a long time. Since gas is about 2.5 times more expensive here.... the calculation becomes different.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 530
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #286 on: January 30, 2019, 11:49 PM »
And a lot of the US models are never sold elsewhere.  Not much purpose for a Ford Raptor in the Netherlands.

Well, we have the taxes in such a way that if you drive around in a tank, you will pay for it... As a consequence less supersized cars and safer traffic. US cars also lagged behind in gas mileage bigtime for a long time. Since gas is about 2.5 times more expensive here.... the calculation becomes different.

Correct, having mechanisms that force people to make more rational decisions helps things a bunch, still, even without, vehicles end up different based on where they go. I wish very much we taxed base on mileage/displacement/engine size/etc.  With no constraint, everything grows, thus if you want just a basic vehicle with small efficient engine, and all around practicality, it doesn't exist.  Everything must be 300-400HP, power everything, 3 row seating, etc. This is how you get people who commute to their office job in an Ford F450 dully with nearly 500hp/1000ft-lb torque able to tow 30,000lbs and it might get used to move a jet sky 3 times a year, and then they complain with fuel prices go up.

On mileage, what is lost is 1) mileage was often shown using different definitions of a gallon, which made European cars look like they went further because they used a bigger gallon. 2) The biggest thing was emissions, the US went after emissions hard in 1970, long before Europe did this. Mileage was not the focus, emissions was.  In Europe the focus was on mileage, not emissions.   This sends things in different directions. US had larger engines with a lot of emissions systems. EU would have small turbo engines, these engines make power efficiently, but terrible emissions.  When EU started to work on emissions starting in the 80s this started the shift to engines there gets a bit bigger and more US like.  At the same time as the US began to look more at mileage after emissions had largely been dealt with, the engines began to get smaller and turbos more common.  Today, the EU and US spec engines are very similar and often the same.  2 Places had different focus, with the other working the other focus later, and thus the 2 eventually converged.  This is why you no longer see situations where if a car was solid in both regions the biggest EU engine might be the smallest US engine.  Similar lines drove US gas engines vs EU diesel engines,   US auto trans usage vs EU manual trans usages.  Regulations and users started things very different and eventually converged.   Globalization has got cars closer to being the same around the world, with far less changes required to bring into the US.  Still, crash test aren't the same yet, and countries have conflicting requirements.  Dumb laws will keep being issues, the US has the chicken tax from the 60s, so 25% take on imported trucks kills those models, companies tend not to invent a new model built in the US, they just don't bother.  Also 25 year import ban prevents people from speaking with their wallet to get the models they want, This law was directly result of Mercedes, people were importing models not sold in the US, people didn't want to deal with Mercedes charging massive markup in the US to keep the illusion of them being luxury cars to US buyers.

 People here would love to be able to buy the wonderful cars folks in the EU, Japan, Australia get,  but car companies have ensured we can't buy them.  Import ban goes away, you would have ships of LR defenders, small hatch backs, unimogs, various basic utility vehicles heading to the US, all the stuff we could never have, or not have in decades, or only have for insane prices.  Not long ago the feds seized people's Defenders from their driveways because the importers paperwork had some issues.  Someone buys a 25 year old vehicle and has it seized!

NAINA is not a festool thing, it's an everything thing.  Big problem of being a large economy, it makes it easy for companies and governments to block importing of stuff because there is enough market for stuff to be unique to the country.  Good news is the past few years, suddenly some retailers are starting to sell to those in the US, now you can even buy stuff from Amazon sites outside the US, so a few things get better.  In the past year I've had a few things come from other countries, it's kind of a weird special treat that just was not a common thing to happen outside of private party transactions or family mailing stuff.

There are things I very much wish Festool didn't customize for north america, like removing metric markings.  If they only sold 220v tools, it would be interesting, folks would adjust like they do with other 220 tools, but would probably be an issue for the portable contractor, so that is a change that makes sense to adapt to a market. Of course their is plenty of global market for 110V tools,  (UK jobsites, US, Canada, Japan, various Caribbean and south American countries, North Korea) so it's not as specialized as some might think.

Adapting to countries is a hard thing, sometimes you have too, sometimes it makes sense, and other times folks really wish they didn't change it (cars here are the classic example, folks ask for the European model to be brought to the US, instead we get some ruined version if we get anything).  IKEA is an example of doing it right, they try their best to sell the exact same item as the rest of the world gets. But when it comes to their kitchen system, they "had" to adapt it some to work with north american kitchen logic/design.

Offline glass1

  • Posts: 519
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #287 on: January 31, 2019, 06:13 AM »
As big critic of the kapex ( not because it’s so bad but because it’s good but a few small changes could make it great), reading all this meandering know it all chatter about everything makes me want to go out and buy a kapex, especially the ks 60.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #288 on: January 31, 2019, 08:59 AM »
As big critic of the kapex ( not because it’s so bad but because it’s good but a few small changes could make it great), reading all this meandering know it all chatter about everything makes me want to go out and buy a kapex, especially the ks 60.

I hope you get your wish and in the future you can report on your KS-60 experiences.

Peter

Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 290
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #289 on: January 31, 2019, 09:11 AM »

Car companies do leave and or never enter the US market because they don't want to re-design certify for the US market.

Yes indeed, Mercedes, BMW, Audi, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Subaru, Hyundai, Kia, et al have failed miserably at adapting their products to the US market.  Festool has been selling the Kapex here in the US for over 10 years.  For at least 3 years we have a growing drumbeat of armature failures and Festool continues to sell the same saw and sees the same failures and the silence is deafening.  Fanboys providing a smokescreen for Festool just encourages their head-in-the-sand approach.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6110
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #290 on: January 31, 2019, 09:24 AM »
As big critic of the kapex ( not because it’s so bad but because it’s good but a few small changes could make it great), reading all this meandering know it all chatter about everything makes me want to go out and buy a kapex, especially the ks 60.

+1

I think I' be tempted to trade in my Kapex for a KS 60, nice & light.  [smile]


Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3999
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #291 on: January 31, 2019, 09:58 AM »
For small stuff I bought the Milwaukee M18 7-1/4” saw. So far so good with limited use and nothing critical. Found a conical adapter in a box of stuff that allows the M18 vac to connect to the saw. Dust collection was very good with fresh pressure treated stock, but that swarf is heavy so it maintains it’s trajectory unlike dry fine dust.

Offline Vondawg

  • Posts: 276
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #292 on: January 31, 2019, 11:18 AM »
DeformedTree’s statement got me thinking ...do you think since the Kapex is the only speed controlled mitersaw (I know of) that THAT might be the root cause (or big contributor) of motor failure? How many long lasting users just run your saws full speed most all the time? I know slower for alum.,plastics etc. is great but I almost never turn down the speed...maybe twice. I realize there’s electronic circuitry for that but ....just wondering.
There are no mistakes....just new designs.

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1136
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #293 on: January 31, 2019, 11:45 AM »
Hopefully Festool is not ruling out anything if it is working on solving any real or perceived motor issue. But the CT extractors or sanders all have variable speed controls, and why just the Kapex, if it is really is the culprit?

Still using my Kapex (three years old) in the same way any hobbyist would be using his or her SCMS (regardless of brands).  No complaints (so far).

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6110
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #294 on: January 31, 2019, 12:07 PM »
But the CT extractors or sanders all have variable speed controls, and why just the Kapex, if it is really is the culprit?

Ya, as far as variable speed tools go, the Kapex is 1600 W, the TS 75 is 1600 W and the OF 2200 is 2200 W.

Haven't heard of many armature issues with the TS or OF tools.  [cool]
« Last Edit: January 31, 2019, 12:42 PM by Cheese »

Offline Job and Knock

  • Posts: 155
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #295 on: January 31, 2019, 12:33 PM »
Ya the Kapex is 1600 W, the TS 75 is 1600 W and the OF 2200 is 2200 W. Haven't heard many issues with the TS or OF tools.
My TS55 and TS75 both go into protect mode (i.e. slow running) when they are on a ropey power supply, By that I mean a power supply with low voltage, such as we get on 110 volt construction sites in the UK from time to time. My OF2200 just refuses to run at all. Most of the time the solution is to keep my site transformer outlets padlocked so nobody else can plug into them.
Simplicity is the embodiment of purity and unity
- Shaker maxim

TS 55 - TS75 - Kapex KS120 - OF1010 - OF2200 - Rotex RO150e - Domino DF500Q -  Domino DF700XL

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1136
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #296 on: January 31, 2019, 12:58 PM »
Exactly! Couldn't the same "protection" that is available to the TSs & routers be built into the Kapex?

The more I think about it, the more I think I need not worry about my Kapex, until proven otherwise. [laughing]

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 806
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #297 on: January 31, 2019, 01:10 PM »
For small stuff I bought the Milwaukee M18 7-1/4” saw. So far so good with limited use and nothing critical. Found a conical adapter in a box of stuff that allows the M18 vac to connect to the saw. Dust collection was very good with fresh pressure treated stock, but that swarf is heavy so it maintains it’s trajectory unlike dry fine dust.

I've been eyeing this up for small trim jobs.

Offline James Biddle

  • Posts: 162
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #298 on: January 31, 2019, 02:00 PM »
For small stuff I bought the Milwaukee M18 7-1/4” saw. So far so good with limited use and nothing critical. Found a conical adapter in a box of stuff that allows the M18 vac to connect to the saw. Dust collection was very good with fresh pressure treated stock, but that swarf is heavy so it maintains it’s trajectory unlike dry fine dust.

I've been eyeing this up for small trim jobs.

I just picked up that same saw with 12Ah and 6Ah batteries.  I also bought a Makita 10" SCMS about a year ago.  I bought both and the batteries from the sale of my Kapex.

Offline glass1

  • Posts: 519
Re: Another Kapex Bites the dust. Again.
« Reply #299 on: January 31, 2019, 06:48 PM »
One thing that I have noticed about the kapex’s use on site( note not an excuse for Festool but...) ; First off it has a true soft start and is one of the slowest saws to get up to speed. I noticed that many carpenters some experienced some not have a bad habit of cutting before full speed is reached and the kapex is especially bad here as it comes up to speed slowly. Secondly When the saw is set up on site I have randomly gone up to the saw and the speed control is not at max where it should be for cutting wood. The dial is too easy to move. It should be remotely located and/ or indexed. This is where Festool should look. Just my 2 cents. But what do I know with 30 years of experience.