Author Topic: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures  (Read 78591 times)

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Offline BloomingtonMike

  • Posts: 26
Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« on: October 11, 2008, 06:51 PM »
I am in the US and just got a Dewalt DWS520SK kit (Dewalt tracksaw) and did a review for woodnet and saw mill creek. Thought you guys might like to read a review I did with it and a buddies TS55. I am a festool 150/EQ owner so I do like Festool very much. I am a finalist in the in the www.dewalt.com/us/top17 contest and that is how I got the Dewalt tracksaw here in the US. It was part of my prize package.

Well here we go. This will out line some differences in the two saws for everyone. I borrowed a buddies TS55 and we compared them head to head.



Physically they are very close in size and weight. The Dewalt is slightly taller and wider by about one inch. The Festool Systainer is much nicer than the Dewalt box but both are adequate to hold the saws and the clamps. The Dewalt power cord is about 12' long and the Festool power cord is about 10' long. The Festool has a removable plug like all their tools and the Dewalt's cord is attached. The Dewalt guard allows the saw's blade to run parallel to the floor. This is not as possible with the Festool saw. There is the same amount of metal and plastic on each saw. Fit and finish I will give to the Festool but the Dewalt looks more rugged.

The Dewalt saw can use the Festool track with no problem. Festool saw cannot use the Dewalt track. Has to due with the guide tracks - three on the Dewalt and one on the Festool. the Dewalt saw can also use both sides of its track and only one side can be used on the Festool.

The Dewalt clamps fit the Festool track and the Festool clamps fit the Dewalt track. The Dewalt clamps are an optional accessory.

Both saw blades use a 20mm arbor. Blade changing is faster barely on the Festool and the controls to do it are simpler on the Festool but to get to the arbor screw both saw had tooless motions. The Festool button motion locks the blade and the Dewalt requires holding in a spring loaded lock while loosening or tightening the bolt. Both saws took close to the same amount of time to change a blade and both use a keyed arbor washer and Hex Head bolt to attach the blade. Both saws have hex key storage in the handles.



The Dewalt blade is just a few fractions/mm larger diameter wise than the Festool Blade. These fractions on the Dewalt blade conflicts with the mechanism of the riving knife on the Festool TS55 saw. So out of the box, with no saw mods, the Dewalt blades are NOT compatible with the Festool Saw.





We found that with a very small grind (with a Dremel or whatever) the problem could be alleviated with the TS55. My buddy said if the price of the Dewalt blades is significantly lower that he would consider grinding the post - but otherwise he will stick with Festool blades.

The Festool blade mounted just fine on the Dewalt saw.



The Dewalt saw guided smoother on its track with all of the play removed than my buddies saw Festool saw guided on his track with all the play removed. In fact I believe my friend has been using it with some play. I think my friend just needs time to adjust his saw perfectly. The Festool saw however is easier to adjust for play and on the Dewalt that option requires a hex key wrench.

Also the Festool saw does not have an anti reverse option. On the Dewalt saw, when anti reverse is turned on, the saw will not slide backwards on the track.

Both saws use a 1 3/8" internal diameter dust collection port. The Fein adapters on my Porter Cable hose worked (hooked to shopvac) on both saws and the collection hose of my friends CT22 Festool vac worked on both saws.

Startup sounds the same on both saws and you instantly realize the soft start on both models. Both saw running are about the same loudness. The lock you press to engage the plunge was smoother on the Festool. It is more of a positive click lock on the Dewalt.

The plunge action of the Dewalt is more of a plunge action than the rocking motion of the Festool. There are two pivot points on the Dewalt saw vs. the one on the Festool. The motor assembly of the Dewalt moves more into the plunge action because of the dual pivot points than does the Festool. The Festool rocking action was smoother however than the plunge of the Dewalt. Both were easy to plunge and can be done with one hand although the manual recommends two. The Dewalt had no resistance during its plunge but resistance was felt by us both in the rocking action of the Festool and by the geometry of the round blade entering at an arc in the pivot of the Festool.

The Dewalt saw has LESS VIBRATION than the Festool. I was shocked at that one. It is close, but that was a plus to Dewalt. Both have variable speeds and both were at max. Now the Dewalt saw spins at 1750-4000 min and the Festool spins at 2000-5200 min. That may have been the vibration difference.

Also the cut was better with the Dewalt blade on the Dewalt Saw vs. the Festool without the splinter guard, the Dewalt does NOT have a waste side splinter guard. Now my buddies blade/guard was not new so that is a factor however the blade was clean (we cleaned the blade prior to the review). With the splinter guard on both saws cut perfect. Also note, when I say better it is only marginal - these saws both cut to a high level of quality. I can see why they say table saw cut quality.

Cutting was done with 1/2" birch plywood and all the cuts were great (as long as Festool had the splinter guard on). We did not use the clamps much but did place anti-slip mat under the work piece.

Another plus to the Dewalt was the setting of the blade depth. It takes into account the track. I tried to show this in the pictures below when both saws were set to zero. If you set the Dewalt to 5/8" it is 5/8" below the track on the Dewalt. That is not the case with the Festool as 20mm is 20mm thickness including the track. The Festool does have a nicer mechanism to set the depth (push in and move) vs. the screw down system on the Dewalt. Both have a nice positive lock when the plunge is returned to full upright position.





Summary:
Dewalt Pros
---------------
1. Longer Power cord
2. Guard can run against Floor for door trimming
3. Dewalt can use Festool track
4. Can use both sides of the Dewalt track (for out and back cuts or with zero clearance set for two different blades)
5. Dewalt can use Festool Blades
6. Dewalt can use Festool clamps
7. Has selectable anti-reverse option
8. Slightly slower speed setting range
9. Dual Pivot plunge action and plunge action had no resistance
10. Less vibration than Festool saw at max speed full power (Festool is faster though)
11. Better no splinter guard (no option for one is bad though) cut
12. Better blade depth measurement system that includes the track already in the measurement

Festool Pros
-----------------
Slightly smaller footprint
Nicer carrying case
Systainer
Nicer fit and finish (I like the Festool look though!)
Detachable cord
Faster Blade Change
Arbor lock built into blade change button system
Smoother plunge button and pivot was smooth
Higher max blade spin rate
Splinter Guard option
Nicer Depth stop mechanism

Pluses for both
-------------------
Clamps and I am assuming other track accessories will work on either brand of track
With a slight Festool mod both saws will use each others blades


I did not review company or customer service qualities - just the two tools in my shop. Also I still need to compare warranties of the two tools.

Hoped you like the write-up.
Mike Heidrick
BloomingtonMike
« Last Edit: October 12, 2008, 11:20 AM by BloomingtonMike »

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Offline Forrest Anderson

  • Posts: 1072
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2008, 07:59 PM »
I am in the US and just got a Dewalt DWS520SK kit (Dewalt tracksaw) and did a review for woodnet and saw mill creek. Thought you guys might like to read a review I did with it and a buddies TS55.

Welcome to the Festool Owners Group, and thank you very much for the comparison between the DeWalt and the Festool saws!

With the recent influx of track saws from DeWalt, Makita and Mafell, Festool owners will be very interested to compare the "opposition"!

Forrest
Compiler of the Consolidated List of Festool Links - the place to go for Festool reviews, manuals, brochures and videos!

Offline Frank Pellow

  • Posts: 2748
  • Toronto, Ontario and Lake Pivabiska, Ontario
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2008, 08:00 PM »
Mike, first of all, I would like to welcome you to the Festool Owner's Group forum and I hope taht you will become a regular participent here.

I enjoyed your review.  I do have a few comments:

  • I don?t understand ?The Dewalt guard allows the saw's blade to run parallel to the floor. This is not as possible with the Festool saw.?
  • It?s good to hear that DeWalt has finally smartened up and provided a decent length cord with one of their tools.
  • You note that ?The Dewalt clamps are an optional accessory.?  So are the Festool clamps.
  • I really like the idea of DeWalt?s ability to use both sides of the track
Cheers,   
               Frank (Festool connoisseur)

Offline quietguy

  • Posts: 487
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2008, 08:32 PM »
Frank,

I think that he is talking about the ability to use the DeWalt as a jamb saw.  See the bars on the the blade shroud. 

Offline balrog

  • Posts: 50
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2008, 10:23 PM »
Thanks for taking the time to share your new toy with us!

Do you have pictures of the Dewalt  guide rail? Does the rail have good grip on the workpiece without using clamps? How long is the  rail?

Good luck with your project for the contest!

Offline BloomingtonMike

  • Posts: 26
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2008, 11:39 PM »
Actually I did a first impression write up as well. Here it is:

Tracksaw came in today. Started to use it to get the feel of it.

Packaging is standard Dewalt fair. Huge plastic box for the saw with cardboard sleeve and zip tie holding case closed. Guide was in a cardboard box with 1/8" hardboard on the bottom. Packaging was just fine. my saw had a pair of clamps in it as well but that may have been added by Dewalt before shipping the saw to us.

There is a manual in the case and a small color quick start guide zip tied to the saw. The QS guide walks you through setting up the saw (includes mounting on the rail and removing any play while mounted on the track) and making the two zero clearance cuts on the rail edges - one on each side. The QS Guide also explains how to change the blade. I had read the manual online last night so I was familiar with the controls of the saw. If you follow the steps in the QS guide everything makes perfect sense.

I choose some 1/2" Birch Plywood scrap piece for the tests. I first made the cut using just the wood on my laminate table and the guide on that. The guide did not slip but the wood did. I found if I used a router anti-slip mat under the wood it worked great. The rail I have is 59". The work piece was 30" or so. I used strips at the ends of the rail to help support it across my table.

The saw moves on the guide SUPER smooth. You seriously can use this setup with one hand. The plunge action is also perfect. The Saw has variable speed but I have just used the max speeds so far. It cuts perfectly.

The guide is very nice and not flimsy. I also played with the anti-kickback setting - very slick idea. I was even able to make a dado with it. I am very impressed.

I lastly mounted it on the panel rack. Makes a slick table for pieces under 40" wide and 8' long plus. Again supports for the rail make the use very nice.

Also wanted to let everyone know that the inside diameter of the dust port is 1 3/8". I had some adapters and rigged up the shop vac using the hose from my PC 7336 ROS. The dust collection with just my shop vac and that 1 1/4" hose was darn near perfect. Maybe a little leading dust on the cut but very acceptable. Also the saw is MUCH quieter than my full size Dewalt circular saw. It does not scream nearly as much.

























Offline BloomingtonMike

  • Posts: 26
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2008, 12:15 AM »
Also add one more pic showing where the Dewalt is made and the UL sticker.


Offline Mark Enomoto

  • Posts: 264
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2008, 04:37 AM »
Dewalt has some pretty good demos of the saw and testimonials: http://www.dewalt.com/us/tracksaw/products/index.html   The irony is that for all of us that own a TS55 or 75 this is all old news. The tracksaw does come in a cordless version which could be the only feature that out guns Festool... for now. The anti kickback feature is also pretty cool and seeing it being used for roof sheathing is a nice feature.  What I'd like to see is more in field uses of Festool equipment from Europe and not the staged demos at Festool HQ. Seeing beat up green in the field might dispel the "boutique" nature of Festool.

FWIW the industrial design of the TS55 is still much better than the Dewalt. Even from the pictures the overall fit and finish do not seem as good. The Dewalt's housing looks clunky and not sure why it is so square unless its purely to distinguish it from Festool.

Great review btw.

Offline RogerF

  • Posts: 67
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2008, 10:19 AM »
Thanks for posting this review. There are some good features on the DeWalt saw, particularly the ability to use it as a jamb saw. I don't want to sound like a Festool cheerleader but I think a comparison of cut quality would have been better had you used a new Festool blade. Clean or not, the direct comparison would have been better. Regardless, thanks to your review I feel confident in the DeWalt's capability and know the Festool's superb cut quality from experience.

Offline wnagle

  • Posts: 502
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2008, 11:20 AM »
I wonder if dewalts cordless version also fits on the festool guiderail and can it be used as a jamb saw?  Might come in handy.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2008, 11:21 AM by wnagle »
Wayne

 

TS 55, CT 33 x2, ROTEX 150, RO 90, DOMINO 500Q SET, TRION PS 300, OF 1400, MFT/3, ETS 150/3, KAPEX KS 120, DOMINO XL.

Offline BloomingtonMike

  • Posts: 26
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2008, 01:28 PM »
Roger, yeah I wish we would have had a new blade on the Festool as well. Would have been a better comparison for sure. Again though, It was darn near a perfect cut anyway and with the splinter guard it was perfect.

The cordless saw has the exact same shoe so yes it will fit the Festool track and can be used with the Dewalt or Festool track as a jamb saw.


Offline mastercabman

  • Posts: 1846
  • NORFOLK,VA
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2008, 02:16 PM »
Frank,

I think that he is talking about the ability to use the DeWalt as a jamb saw.  See the bars on the the blade shroud. 
So,how would that work?  Do you use the saw by itself?Or do you use it with the fence?
If you use the fence,how do you secure the fence on a  ei: door?
As a jamb saw how would you adjust the hight of cut?
I don't understand!?! I keep cutting it,and it's still too short!

Offline Dan Clermont

  • Festool Dealer
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  • Canadian Festool Dealer
    • Ultimate Tools
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2008, 12:03 PM »
Nice review Mike!!! Great pics!

Do you know what the Dewalt will be selling for in the US?

Wonder if Dewalt will start to manufacture more tools in the Czech Republic or why this saw was made there and not with the other tools in China (???)

Have you tried cutting on a 45 degree angle on the rail? Does the blade mate up properly with the wear strip when not at 90 degrees?

Thanks
Dan Clermont
Canadian Festool Dealer and User!!!
604.291.9663

Offline fshanno

  • Posts: 898
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2008, 01:33 PM »
This saw and it's guide have serious problems for me. 

First, I need to be able to butt the other side of the guide up against fences and other things so I need some height on the off side.  So the guide is useless for me.

I've got to have tear out/chip out protection on both sides of the cut on sheet goods.  I need four good edges when I'm done.  If I can't get that with a guided saw I'll have to go back to the table saw.  So I'm wondering how good the other side is with the DeWalt.  We have our little green thing and Eurekazone has the Smart Base which is essentially a zero clearance throat plate.  What is DeWalt's solution?  I'd be curious to see the cuts on various types of veneers and melamine and slatwall and such after the blade has some hours on it.  I know this much, I replace the little green thing more often than I replace the strip on the guide.





The one thing we learn from history is that we never learn from history.

Offline Frank Pellow

  • Posts: 2748
  • Toronto, Ontario and Lake Pivabiska, Ontario
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2008, 02:37 PM »
Frank,

I think that he is talking about the ability to use the DeWalt as a jamb saw.  See the bars on the the blade shroud. 
So,how would that work?  Do you use the saw by itself?Or do you use it with the fence?
If you use the fence,how do you secure the fence on a  ei: door?
As a jamb saw how would you adjust the hight of cut?
Mike sent me this link which demonstrates what he is talking about:

Hi Fank.

http://www.dewalt.com/us/tracksaw/applications/index.html

Under applications click on "Trimming Interrior doors while still on its edges".

that is what I was trying to explain.


I doubt that this is something that I would ever want to do.
 

Cheers,   
               Frank (Festool connoisseur)

Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7134
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #15 on: October 14, 2008, 10:13 AM »

Mike sent me this link which demonstrates what he is talking about:

Hi Fank.

http://www.dewalt.com/us/tracksaw/applications/index.html

Under applications click on "Trimming Interrior doors while still on its edges".

that is what I was trying to explain.


I doubt that this is something that I would ever want to do.
 



This isn't unique to the DeWalt saw, the Festool saws can do the same thing. I've never tried it, might be the way to go if you're by yourself with a heavy door.


 
Nice review Mike!!! Great pics!

Do you know what the Dewalt will be selling for in the US?

 
Thanks
Dan Clermont


Dan, I don't know the exact price but at least as much as the Festool TS 55, the cordless version is going to be a good bit more.
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline murphyt

  • Posts: 17
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #16 on: October 14, 2008, 01:25 PM »
I saw on smc forum that the price on the corded version is 499 usd and cordless 999 usd I think that is 59 inch track. There was a lot of unhappy people on that thread. I saw in a british magazine that metabo have one soon to be released as well.
Johannesburg
South Africa

Offline Forrest Anderson

  • Posts: 1072
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2008, 08:21 PM »
As regards price in the USA, there's a video of it being used at a trade show at http://blogs.taunton.com/fw-editorsblog?entry=294 and some sample package prices (rail and saw) start to be mentioned at about the 4min 20 sec point.

Forrest

Compiler of the Consolidated List of Festool Links - the place to go for Festool reviews, manuals, brochures and videos!

Offline BloomingtonMike

  • Posts: 26
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #18 on: October 15, 2008, 01:44 AM »
I believe that on woodnet and SMC, Rick and I are the only ones that have the Dewalt saw. I am not sure why the SMC folks would be unhappy as none of them have used the Dewalt. I know there is some feelings about the pricing rumors about the Dewalt - many want a cheap solution. It is funny to me because the next complaint is of tools that are exactly that - cheap. I am confident that many who have used the Festool Tracksaw would also be impressed with the Dewalt Tracksaw as they would know what to appreciate and what they would like to improve in their Festool Tracksaw. That is exactly what my friend at work who owns the Festool Tracksaw I compared is feeling right now.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2008, 01:46 AM by BloomingtonMike »

Offline Overtime

  • Posts: 265
  • Eastern Iowa USA
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #19 on: October 15, 2008, 02:17 AM »
I don't think I would be trimming the bottoms of doors while they are hanging on the jamb. But thats just me and I'm not doing mutiple unit contractor jobs.

Is it really that much of a time saver to not just remove the hinge pins and work on the door on some padded saw horses ?

  I would feel that I would have much better control of the cut working from a more stable position. Not to mention the dressing of the finished cut like a small lightly sanded chamfer on all 4 edges. And then theres the bottom of the door. You gonna just leave the exposed raw cut to stay in good condition and not become a new problem down the line ? Outa sight outa mind kinda thing. Do you not seal it with a little primer or something to keep moisture out to prevent swelling and delamination ? A 5 minute process.

 I don't see this feature as anything special but then I'm getting older and laying on the floor to attempt a fine cut isn't something I'm in any hurry to try. 
 
Patrick

Offline roadking06

  • Posts: 37
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2008, 08:01 AM »
Every newly designed tool, will initially come out at a higher price to recoup some of the development costs. Dewalt has research and development time invested in the new track saw. In 18 months or less, Dewalt will significantly drop the price because their time to market and manufacturing speed will fill in the profit margin of the saw, to be sold in quantity.

This is awesome because it will force festool to adjust price if they want to be competitive in this market.

While most of us who already own festool tools know the quality, fit and finish of our saws, regular joe on the street looking to buy a track saw will see a dewalt at $250 and the festool at $475. Fundamentally both saws complete the same task. Guess which saw is going to be bought.



Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 791
  • Michigan
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #21 on: October 15, 2008, 08:19 AM »
I think that would be true if Festool was trying to compete in the mass market, but that hasn't been the case.   There are countless drills and sanders available and its not obvious to me that this fact has driven the prices of the festool products.

I believe Festool focuses on quality and functionality and prices their tools accordingly.

Fred
Fred

Offline Frank Pellow

  • Posts: 2748
  • Toronto, Ontario and Lake Pivabiska, Ontario
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #22 on: October 15, 2008, 09:03 AM »
I think that would be true if Festool was trying to compete in the mass market, but that hasn't been the case.   There are countless drills and sanders available and its not obvious to me that this fact has driven the prices of the festool products.

I believe Festool focuses on quality and functionality and prices their tools accordingly.

Fred
And I certainly expect them to continue to focus on quality and functionality.
Cheers,   
               Frank (Festool connoisseur)

Offline Pete Pedisich

  • Posts: 196
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #23 on: October 15, 2008, 11:02 AM »
The DeWalt saw looks like a great saw, and I would consider buying one if I didn't already have an ATF55, but one thing I always look at since I work at a manufacturing firm: All the Festools I own were made in Germany, and I think the only one made outside is the linear sander.
I would never expect Festool to be able to compete price-wise with a product made in the Czech Republic, or China, or Malaysia, etc... That's just not reasonable. But that does not mean that the DeWalt is less appealing to me, they did a great job with that saw, if it was out in '05 I might have got it instead of my ATF55.

But, and this is just my personal feelings/preference, I respect Festool immensely for their commitment to German manufacturing and to the workers in their country.

I wish DeWalt, P/C, Milwaukee had done the same for American workers! Although I understand they did what they had to do to survive.


-pjp


Offline greg mann

  • Posts: 1758
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #24 on: October 15, 2008, 02:29 PM »
The DeWalt saw looks like a great saw, and I would consider buying one if I didn't already have an ATF55, but one thing I always look at since I work at a manufacturing firm: All the Festools I own were made in Germany, and I think the only one made outside is the linear sander.
I would never expect Festool to be able to compete price-wise with a product made in the Czech Republic, or China, or Malaysia, etc... That's just not reasonable. But that does not mean that the DeWalt is less appealing to me, they did a great job with that saw, if it was out in '05 I might have got it instead of my ATF55.

But, and this is just my personal feelings/preference, I respect Festool immensely for their commitment to German manufacturing and to the workers in their country.

I wish DeWalt, P/C, Milwaukee had done the same for American workers! Although I understand they did what they had to do to survive.
-pjp




While this is a little OT, it comes up occasionally. Pete, I agree with your assessment. I always feel better about spending a little more for the intangibles, especially if I know the company has a long term view regarding product quality, customer needs and service, and commitment to employees. I bolded your last statement because I do feel it did not necessarily need to be that way. Witness the new Unisaw made and assembled here in the U.S. as an example. 
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan

Offline RogerF

  • Posts: 67
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #25 on: October 15, 2008, 02:42 PM »
I don't think I would be trimming the bottoms of doors while they are hanging on the jamb. But thats just me and I'm not doing mutiple unit contractor jobs.

Is it really that much of a time saver to not just remove the hinge pins and work on the door on some padded saw horses ?

  I would feel that I would have much better control of the cut working from a more stable position. Not to mention the dressing of the finished cut like a small lightly sanded chamfer on all 4 edges. And then theres the bottom of the door. You gonna just leave the exposed raw cut to stay in good condition and not become a new problem down the line ? Outa sight outa mind kinda thing. Do you not seal it with a little primer or something to keep moisture out to prevent swelling and delamination ? A 5 minute process.

 I don't see this feature as anything special but then I'm getting older and laying on the floor to attempt a fine cut isn't something I'm in any hurry to try. 
 
I don't think it is the bottom of doors that one would use the saw that way. I think it is for floor installers. Let say you're putting down some 3/4" T&G flooring. You want it to fit under the door jambs and casing. By laying the saw on its side and parallel to the floor one could undercut the casings that way.

Offline Steve-CO

  • Posts: 787
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2008, 03:05 PM »
I don't think it is the bottom of doors that one would use the saw that way. I think it is for floor installers. Let say you're putting down some 3/4" T&G flooring. You want it to fit under the door jambs and casing. By laying the saw on its side and parallel to the floor one could undercut the casings that way.

Roger, If you check out the link above for the Dewalt site it shows the saw being used to trim doors without taking them down.

Offline Frank Pellow

  • Posts: 2748
  • Toronto, Ontario and Lake Pivabiska, Ontario
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #27 on: October 15, 2008, 03:09 PM »
I don't think it is the bottom of doors that one would use the saw that way. I think it is for floor installers. Let say you're putting down some 3/4" T&G flooring. You want it to fit under the door jambs and casing. By laying the saw on its side and parallel to the floor one could undercut the casings that way.

Roger, If you check out the link above for the Dewalt site it shows the saw being used to trim doors without taking them down.
Just becuase the site shows it, it does not mean that this would be a good thing to do.  I am almost certain that I would never cut the bottom off a (removable) door this way, even if I had the tools to do so.
Cheers,   
               Frank (Festool connoisseur)

Offline fshanno

  • Posts: 898
IT HAS A T-SQUARE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
« Reply #28 on: October 15, 2008, 07:19 PM »
It has a T-SQUARE that looks like it ACTUALLY WORKS!!!  Looks like it might fit in our guide.  OH PLEASE GOD!  PLEASE LET IT FIT! 

Did anybody else see this?  They have a little blurb on their applications page....

T-Square demo

I'm I seeing this right?  It's not adjustable.  It's set to 90.  It won't come undone.  HELLO!  FESTOOL!  ANYBODY THERE!

I bet it won't fit our guides.  Of course it won't.  DeWalt would be stupid to let that happen.
The one thing we learn from history is that we never learn from history.

Offline Dovetail65

  • Posts: 4390
    • Rose Farm Floor Medallions and Inlays
Re: Dewalt DWS520SK vs Festool TS55EQ - long with pictures
« Reply #29 on: October 15, 2008, 09:06 PM »
The Eureka zone system also has had a T square for a few years already. I modified one to work in the Festool rail and it worked nicely. I sold it with all my Eurekazone stuff, but it is no big deal.

Festool already sold and made one that they discontinued I think when they were still Festo. It also cuts at any angle not just at a 90.

I will dig it out of a box and put up a picture of it.

As far as cutting the doors in place I am NOT a believer and think the jamb saw  cut function should be left for the flooring installer to cut casings, etc.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2008, 09:20 PM by nickao »
The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.