Author Topic: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.  (Read 129997 times)

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Offline Brice Burrell

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MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« on: January 12, 2008, 09:07 PM »
EDIT: You can find a PDF format copy of this review here, MFS User's Guide by Brice Burrell
The PDF is also attached at the bottom of this post.           
         



The Festool MFS, Multi-routing template.


  Here is a look at the Festool MFS 400 and MFS 700, multi-routing template system. While these tools excel as routing templates they are capable of far more. Routing operations like open field inlays, boarders, cut outs, mortises, routing circles, curves and arcs are just part of what the MFS system can do. Use the MFS with your Multi Function Table to help square the guide rail with the table, or as a cutting fence, I've even used the profiles as a temple to make cuts with my jigsaw! To understand the full value of this accessory don't think of it as a "Routing Template". Envision profiles that form templates, squares, fences, stops, story sticks and jigs of every kind, a "Multi-Function Profile" system.

  The first thing I'd like to do is credit Jerry Work, Ned Young and John Lucas for the work that they have already done to help us get the most out of the MFS and the Festool system. Some of the methods, techniques and ideas you will see here have come from their writings. So, thank you gentlemen. *See "Notes" at the bottom of this page.

        The components of the MFS 400 and MFS 700.

To get started lets took a look at the components that make up the MFS template system. Knowing the what the parts are and what they do from the beginning will help you understand the functions and methods later on in this review. 


In this photo you see what is included with the MFS 400 set: two 400 mm and two 200 mm profiles, two angle stops, anti-tilting insert, circle cutting insert and pivot, 3 mm ball head allen driver, connecting hardware and instruction manual. The MFS 700 set (not pictured above)includes all of the same except it's profiles are 400 mm and 700 mm.


The MFS profiles are aluminum extrusions with graduated Metric scales printed on. Profiles are 80 mm wide and 16 mm thick with a series of "Joiner" or "V"slots and "Clamp" slots. The Joiner or V slots are for the connecting hardware, circle cutting insert and pivot and the coupling hardware (not included with the sets) for joining profiles length wise. I'll go into detail on how to join the profiles in it's own section in this review.


 The Festool FSZ 120, FSZ 300 and FS-HZ clamps fit in the clamp slots. As does the guide rail connectors, they can as be used to join the profiles in length. Plus 1/4" square and hex nuts also fit if you want to add a fixture to the profiles or mount them to jig or table with your own (imperial sized) hardware.


The 3 mm ball head driver is used on almost all of the MFS hardware. The the ball head allows the driver to be used on an angle as shown in this photo.


The angle stops mount into the V slots and are used to help position the MFS.

* Notes: Here is a link to Jerry Work's MFS manual. Jerry Work designs and hand crafts fine furniture in Kerby, OR. Check out his site, The Dovetail Joint. Ned Young started a thread on the Festool Owners Group forum, Notes on the MFS. John Lucas has shared a lot of great ideas on his site, WoodShopDemos.

Text and pictures, copyright 2008, Brice Burrell

In the interests of full disclosure, this tool was provided by Festool for review purposes.

PDF attached below.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2018, 04:58 PM by Brice Burrell »
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Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2008, 09:10 PM »
Until I have time to replace all of the missing images you can find the whole guide in PDF format here,             
         





Here the angle stops are mounted on the bottom of the MFS to precisely locate the MFS for an inlay.


This is the anti-tilting insert, it is used to prevent the router from tipping or tilting during routing operations. If the router is tilted the work piece can be ruined. Copying rings fit into the anti-tilting insert, this allows the it to travel with the router. The insert can fit 24, 27, 30 and 40 mm copying rings.


Here you can see the insert in place under the router. The insert is only needed when the profiles are spread to far apart for the router's base to be fully supported by the profiles themselves.


This is the circle cutting insert and pivot. Again, I'll go into more detail about how to use the MFS to rout circles, curves and arcs in it's own section.

Festool offers some other accessories not shown in this review. Longer profiles are available, 1000 mm profiles and 2000 mm profiles to extend the MFS template system. The Routing Slide used with the MFS to support the router when routing out large areas, for example open field inlays. Also offered, as spare parts, are a set of 4 MFS "Joiners" (part # 493235) that fit into the V slots to connect profiles length wise, you'll need to call Festool's service department to order the joiners.

Alright, you've seen the parts, now let's see what they do. On the next post, I'm going to start with:Connecting the MFS profiles.

Text and pictures, copyright 2008, Brice Burrell

« Last Edit: May 11, 2018, 09:42 PM by Brice Burrell »
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Offline brandon.nickel

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2008, 12:07 AM »
Very nice, Brice.  I've been waiting for a good photo-essay of how to use this.  I just made my own version of the follower this evening to use my OF1400 to roundover the curved edge of a lazy suzan.  A countersunk M6 in a scrap of 3/4 plywood worked quite well.  I also used the same technique to make a trammel arm to cut the circles out.  I'm looking forward to the rest of this post.
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Offline Garry

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2008, 12:11 AM »
I know I'm excited.  I got the 700 recently with no idea how to utilize it, other than for a box lid I want to make with a trough (sp?) in it for an insert.  I can't wait for the rest of htis review.
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Offline Eiji Fuller

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2008, 01:17 AM »
Brice,

On the pic showing the angle stops it looks as if the mfs profile with the stops attached to it is bent or the joining piece is not square causing it to tilt off plane. What's up with that?

Eiji

Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2008, 08:21 AM »
Brice,

On the pic showing the angle stops it looks as if the mfs profile with the stops attached to it is bent or the joining piece is not square causing it to tilt off plane. What's up with that?

Eiji

  Eiji, it's because the hardware on the profiles is loose, I hadn't set the MFS to size yet. Sorry, I should replace that pic to avoid any confusion.

(Edit, I replaced the old pic of the angle stops.)
« Last Edit: January 13, 2008, 04:43 PM by Brice Burrell »
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Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2008, 08:30 AM »
             
               
             




Connecting the MFS profiles. 
 
  In this section I'm going to show how to connect the profiles into rectangles and length wise. 


The MFS profiles have male and female ends, they are shown here. The male ends have two small studs or indexing pins to align the profiles. Also the male ends have the connectiong hardware, notice the "V" nut with a ball detent.


The male end fits into the female end to index the profiles length wise, guide rail connector or the MFS jointer can be used to secure the connection. Guide rail connectors (fitted into the clamp slot) are used in the photo above.


The V nut on the male end of the profile fits into the V slot in the edge of another profile. The male's indexing pins also fit into the edge V slots to ensure perfect alignment.



This shot is of a close up of two profiles connected.


To make a rectangle, connect two profiles, a short and long one, to form a "L" with the scales on the inside. Use the allen driver to secure the jiont.


You can see from this picture that the scales are on the inside of the "L". The scales are an important feature of the MFS, they allow the template to be quickly set to size.


Once you have two "L" shapes formed, connect the two to make a rectangle.

Text, graphics and pictures, copyright 2008, Brice Burrell
« Last Edit: May 11, 2018, 09:42 PM by Brice Burrell »
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Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2008, 07:07 PM »
                         
From the animation you can see how to set or adjust the MFS profiles. They have to move as (sort of "L" shaped) pairs to set the width and length. At first assembling the profiles can be kind of tough, but after doing it a few times you get the feel for it. I've sprayed my profiles, including the hardware, with a dry lubricant, this helps reduce some of the friction while adjusting them. Another added benefit it lets tools slide on them easily.


By combining sets and/or the longer profiles, different shapes can be made. This will greatly increase the usefulness of the system.



It may be necessary to add the connecting hardware to both ends of some of the profiles to join different shapes. The hardware can be removed from one profile and added to another. The bolt and V nut have to be removed and the threaded insert can be taken out. The insert has an allen recess, the insert is reverse threaded, turn clockwise to remove, use a 4 mm allen key. The insert can then be screwed into the another profile, turning counter clockwise, it will self tap into the aluminum. I recommend exercising great care removing and installing the connecting hardware, it would not be hard to strip the aluminum, especially if you forget about the reverse threading.


The angle stops have V nuts that slide into the V slots to mount the stops to the profiles. The stops can be mounted square or on an angle.

  Connecting the profiles can be tricky in the beginning as I've already mentioned, sometimes you wish you had another set of hands to line up all of the hardware. The key is to be patient when connecting and adjusting the MFS profiles. Taking the time to perfectly set the template will show in the ends results that you can achieve with this system.

  Moving on to using the MFS system, it's hard to know what to cover first. I think most people imagine the MFS being used as a routing template, so why not start there.

Coming soon: Template Routing with the MFS System.

Text, graphics and pictures, copyright 2008, Brice Burrell
« Last Edit: August 29, 2008, 11:17 PM by Brice Burrell »
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Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2008, 10:01 AM »
             Template Routing with the MFS System.  
 
  Routing inlays, boarders, cutouts, mortises, circles, curves and arcs can be very accurately done with the MFS. I know my results are much better now that I'm using the MFS instead of the wooden jigs and fixtures I've used in the past. Template routing with the MFS is a fairly straightforward concept. However, there are a few things to keep in mind when deciding how to use and setup this system as a routing template, I'll go over some of them in this section, as well show you how I use the MFS for my routing projects.


  If you happen to be unfamiliar with what template routing is, I'll explain. It is using a jig, fixture or in this case, the MFS profiles to guide a router's travel. The router must have a copying ring (guide bushing) or a bit with a bearing to prevent the bit from cutting into the template as it travels. When using a bit with a bearing, like a flush cut or pattern bit, the profiles can be set to the exact size needed, whether it is a cutout or mortise. This really simplifies the setup. However, using a pattern bit is not without it's risks. The issue is with the bit accidentally cutting into the template/profile. This can happen one of two ways. First, while plunging the bit into the work piece, before the bearing can engages the template (with the bearing still above the profile) it can't stop the bit from going astray and doing bad things to your profile. The second issue is, if the bearing happens to land in the V slot in the edge of the profile, you can run into this with smaller bit as they usually have small bearings that can fall into the slot.


  The picture above shows the potential dangers of using a pattern bit with the MFS. I'm not suggesting pattern bits can't be used, but, care must be taken when selecting the right bit. Bearing size, cutting length and diameter should factored into the decision. When used in the right circumstances they can be a real asset.

  I use the MFS most often to rout for hardware like lock sets, strikes, latches and catches, but, most of all hinges. I've made all kinds of jigs to rout hinges, all of them out of wood or MDF. While they do work, it is usually only a short time before they become inaccurate from relatively light use. If you have ever used a wooden jig you know what I mean. I've had to add very thin shims to my hinge templates to finish jobs, not wanting to make a new jig to rout one or two more hinges. That drove my nuts! Now, I use the MFS, it is so much faster, easier and far more accrete then the wooden jigs ever were. I can setup the MFS and make a test cut in about five minutes or less. If it needs to be adjusted, that can usually be done in less than one minute. If a wooden jig is off, you're stuck shimming or remaking the entire jig. So let me show you how I use the MFS with a small pattern bit to rout hinges.


The first step is to mark the setback for the hinge, I'll use this line to index the MFS.

Text, graphics and pictures, copyright 2008, Brice Burrell
« Last Edit: August 29, 2008, 11:17 PM by Brice Burrell »
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Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2008, 10:07 AM »

With the small pattern bit I use to rout my hinges I can set the MFS to the exact length of the hinge. The width is set wide enough so I can test fit the hinge without removing the MFS.


Once the MFS is set to size, I place it on the pencil line then set the angle stops and clamp the work piece/MFS down.


Here is a close look at the bit I'll be using, it is the same type that I showed earlier, you can see I've add a second bearing to solve the problem of the bearing falling into the V slot. It is a 1/2" diameter, this will match the 1/4" radius on the hinges.


After installing the bit, the next step is to set the router's depth, plunge the router until it comes into contact with the work piece, this is zeroing the bit. Now, I use the hinge itself between one of the turret stops and the depth rod to set the exact depth.


It's time to rout, with the profiles set to be wider then the hinge this leaves an open space for me to fully plunge the bit before contacting the work piece. I make systematic passes removing small amounts pre pass. Again with the MFS wider than the hinge, I can test fit the hinge without removing the template. When I'm happy with the fit, I remove the MFS and test fit once more and make adjustments as needed.


I got a perfect fit on the first try, but remember to always make test cuts on scrap first.

Text, graphics and pictures, copyright 2008, Brice Burrell
« Last Edit: January 30, 2009, 09:13 PM by Brice Burrell »
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Offline Jesse Cloud

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2008, 10:25 AM »
Thanks Brice!  This is a great tutorial.  I got an MFS for Christmas and haven't tried it out yet.  You have saved me a lot of time and frustration!!

Offline Rob McGilp

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2008, 02:04 PM »
Great stuff Brice! Tell me, is there any point in buying the 400 if you can do everything it does and more with the 700?

Regards,

Rob

Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2008, 03:11 PM »
Great stuff Brice! Tell me, is there any point in buying the 400 if you can do everything it does and more with the 700?

Regards,

Rob


  Well Rob, that is a hard question to answer. I would recommend getting both sets and maybe even the longer 1000 or 2000 mm profiles too. The more I use these things the more uses I find for them. One of the big reasons I can do so many things with the MFS system is from having more than one set. Later on in this review I'll show a few things that can't really be done with one set.

That being said, I understand most people have very real budget constants. If you feel more of your work is going to be with smaller projects then the MFS 400 is a good fit. If you take a look at MFS 400 I'm using to rout the hinges in the pictures above, you can see it seems pretty large compared to the work piece. Imagine using the MFS 700 to that job, it could be a little awkward. Of course it can be done. OTOH, if you want to do larger work, the 400 can't do it, get the 700 set.

  Rob, I really think you would like the MFS. It is so easy to do inlay work with the MFS, as Jerry Work says in his manual, inlays add a lot of perceived value to a piece. The effort verses the return in the added value of your work more than makes up for the price you pay for the MFS templates.

  Keep checking back over the next few days, I 'll be adding a lot more to this review.
   
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Offline Rob McGilp

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2008, 04:27 PM »
Thanks Brice,
You've answered my question perfectly.

Regards,

Rob

Offline Steven in Iowa

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #14 on: January 14, 2008, 05:40 PM »
Brice,
  I vote for you writing a 'Festool' book.  Your detailed pictorials are some of the best I've seen and read.  You cannot believe how much they've pushed my understanding of the Festools I own.  Keep up the great work.  AND thanks.
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Offline CharlesWilson

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #15 on: January 14, 2008, 11:13 PM »
Brice,

In one of your posts, you said:

It may be necessary to add the connecting hardware to both ends of some of the profiles to join different shapes. The hardware can be removed from one profile and added to another. The bolt and V nut have to be removed and the threaded insert can be taken out. The insert has an allen recess, the insert is reverse threaded, turn clockwise to remove, use a 4 mm allen key. The insert can then be screwed into the another profile, turning counter clockwise, it will self tap into the aluminum. I recommend exercising great care removing and installing the connecting hardware, it would not be hard to strip the aluminum, especially if you forget about the reverse threading.

I would just like to point out that I tried to buy additional connecting hardware from FestoolUSA, but they don't seem to be able to provide it!  Also, as I mentioned in a previous thread, I tried to by just two of the 200mm rails, so that I could obtain a lot of the functionality you described (added to my MFS 700 and 1000mm rails), but, again, the part is NAINA.

I hope that your great picture book of MFS applications will induce FestoolUSA to make these parts available.

Great Job!!

Charles
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Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2008, 10:32 AM »

Let's now look at using copying rings or guide bushings with the MFS. The advantage of using copying rings is twofold, they are always in place while routing, greatly reducing the chance of cutting into the profile and they work with most bits used for template routing, regardless of the bit's cutting length. Unlike bearing guided bits where the cutter's length is so important. Of course you do have to account for the offset between the bit and the copying ring when setting the MFS to size.


The following is a series of drawings showing the setup of the MFS for a mortise. Our mortise will be 20 mm wide by 100 mm long and 50 mm deep. A 10 mm bit will be used with a 30 mm copying ring in the router. We need to account for the space between the bit and to the outside edge of the copying ring, called offset, when we set the MFS profiles to size. The offset for this bit/copying ring combination is 10 mm.


Knowing the offset is 10 mm we add that number twice (20 mm) to the width and length of the mortise. 40 mm x 120 mm is what the MFS should be set at to produce our 20 mm X 100 mm mortise.


Clamp the MFS down where you want it, set the depth of the bit, rout...... The result should be this, a mortise 20 mm X 100 mm X 50 mm.

Text, graphics and pictures, copyright 2008, Brice Burrell
« Last Edit: August 29, 2008, 11:20 PM by Brice Burrell »
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Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2008, 10:38 AM »
Working in Metric makes setting the MFS to size pretty easy, however, I understand most of you are much more comfortable working in Imperial. So let's do another mortise with Imperial measurements, but this time I'll be cutting real wood.


How about a mortise 3/4" wide, 3" long and 1/2" deep. In the router is a 1/2" straight bit with a 3/4" bushing. So the total offset I need to account for is 1/4".


Setting the MFS to size in Imperial measurements I use a steel rule. With the offset added the dimensions are 1" X 3 1/4".


With the MFS set to size, I'll place the template on the work piece, I've drawn lines to indicate were the MFS will be set and the mortise will be cut. Once everything has been set (MFS and the bit depth) and then clamped, I start the routing.


A shallow mortise like this one only takes a few passes.


The finished mortise. The angle stops make it a breeze to set the MFS up quickly when you need to rout the same location/size mortises on multiple work pieces. Just imagine the ease of routing traditional M&T joints for table and chair legs or mission style furniture.

Text, graphics and pictures, copyright 2008, Brice Burrell
« Last Edit: August 29, 2008, 11:21 PM by Brice Burrell »
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Offline Dan Clermont

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2008, 11:50 AM »
Nicely done Brice!

The pictures are worth a 1000 words!

Have you tried routing a groove for a rail and stile door using this system? I am thinking their may not be enough wood on either side to register the MFS properly but perhaps I am wrong

Dan Clermont
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Offline clintholeman

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #19 on: January 15, 2008, 11:56 AM »
Brice-

You done really, really good here!  The pix are worth 10,000 words.

A ton of thanks to you!

Offline bruegf

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2008, 12:45 PM »
D#$#@@#n you Brice,

Now I want one of those too.   Excellent job, as always.   Keep up the great work.

Fred
Fred

Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #21 on: January 15, 2008, 01:52 PM »
Have you tried routing a groove for a rail and stile door using this system? I am thinking their may not be enough wood on either side to register the MFS properly but perhaps I am wrong

Dan Clermont

Dan, I haven't, but, I'm sure it can be done. check out the pictures below. It's from my jack miter "how to", notice the work piece clamped to the side of the MFT with MFS then supported/clamped to the table top. If your rails and stiles are narrow, like for cabinet doors then let something like in the last two pics. A block of wood to offer some support.

Thanks everyone, I'm glad you guys are finding this worth while. I'm not even half way through this review yet, so if you aren't ready to buy the MFS yet, you will be by the end.  :P 
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Offline Dan Clark

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #22 on: January 15, 2008, 02:06 PM »
Brice,

Very nice!    As the saying goes, a pic is worth a thousand words.   But I like the drawings even better.  Sometimes a drawing is worth a bunch of pics!    The drawings of the copying ring and MFS' do a great job of clarifying the concept.

Therefore, I'm giving you the OH ficial:



And the brand new (just for you):


Regards,

Dan.

« Last Edit: January 15, 2008, 02:07 PM by Dan Clark »

Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #23 on: January 15, 2008, 04:28 PM »
Inlays are a great way to add some interesting detail to your projects. The inlay I am going to do now is a simple and relativity small but it is going to have a huge impact on the piece.


We start the same way as the rest of the examples by selecting the bit/copying ring combo, setting the MFS to size. In the picture here I'm add some scrap stock to act as shims to help support the MFS.


More of the same, set the depth of the bit and rout. I need to be a little careful because I'm routing off each edge, tare out can happen here. Removing small amounts near the edges will greatly reduce the chance of tare out.


Here are the pieces that I will use for the inlay, zebra wood.


With the pieces fitting perfectly, some blue tape will help hold the pieces in alignment until I can glue and clamp them.


In the photo above the excess zebra wood has been cut off and the piece sanded. Using the MFS to rout this inlay was not much effort, but, added a lot of visual appeal to this piece.

Text, graphics and pictures, copyright 2008, Brice Burrell
« Last Edit: August 29, 2008, 11:22 PM by Brice Burrell »
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Offline Steve Rowe

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #24 on: January 15, 2008, 06:06 PM »
Dan,
I don't know if you've ever noticed this or not but, did you know that you have two right hands? ;D

Brice,
Good thread and great pictures.
Thanks,
Steve

Brice,

Very nice!    As the saying goes, a pic is worth a thousand words.   But I like the drawings even better.  Sometimes a drawing is worth a bunch of pics!    The drawings of the copying ring and MFS' do a great job of clarifying the concept.

Therefore, I'm giving you the OH ficial:



And the brand new (just for you):


Regards,

Dan.



Offline Dan Clark

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Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2008, 10:22 PM »
Steve,

Yep.   When I first tried this, I made them mirror images.  Looked dumb!   :o   (Actually, two thumbs up looks dumb too, but not quite as bad!   ;D )

Regards,

Dan.

Dan,
I don't know if you've ever noticed this or not but, did you know that you have two right hands? ;D

Brice,
Good thread and great pictures.
Thanks,
Steve

Brice,

Very nice!    As the saying goes, a pic is worth a thousand words.   But I like the drawings even better.  Sometimes a drawing is worth a bunch of pics!    The drawings of the copying ring and MFS' do a great job of clarifying the concept.

Therefore, I'm giving you the OH ficial:



And the brand new (just for you):


Regards,

Dan.



Offline Dave Ronyak

  • Posts: 2234
  • Flyin' from NE Ohio
Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2008, 10:49 PM »
Brice,

I vote your tutorial on use of the MFS the best yet!!  Thanks.  Now I want one (or two).  I am a bit concerned reading about the difficulty (impossibility) that some have expressed about components not being available in NA.  I looked into availability of the extra connectors kit about a year ago and was told "no" so I refused to buy any set.

Thanks, also, to Jerry for his excellent manual on this tool.

Dave R.
Friends, family and Festools make for a good retirement.  PCs...I'm not so sure.

Offline jo041326

  • Posts: 76
  • Czech republic
Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2008, 03:24 AM »
Hi Brice,
your tutorials are really outstanding. Perfect photos, simple text. Great. As I wrote you, I am not convinced about some accessories as for the price. But there are some which are hardly to replace with cheaper or simpler solution. And thanks to your tutorial one can see all the possibilities what to do with it. Thank you.
Josef

Offline bruegf

  • Posts: 794
  • Michigan
Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #28 on: January 16, 2008, 08:40 AM »
Brice,

Any chance you will create a PDF of this material when you're finished?  Definitely a document I'd like to add to my reference library.

Thanks

Fred
Fred

Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7356
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: MFS 400 and MFS 700 Multi-Routing Template System.
« Reply #29 on: January 16, 2008, 09:22 AM »
Brice,

Any chance you will create a PDF of this material when you're finished?  Definitely a document I'd like to add to my reference library.

Thanks

Fred

  Fred, at this point the answer is no, however, the review is on my site as well. MFS review. I've never done it, but, I understand it is possible to convert web pages in to PDF files. You could look into that, perhaps someone here knows how to do it.

  I'd like to be able to easily convert this into a PDF, but the document programs I have don't insert photographs very well. And to make things even worse, every time I try to convert a document to a PDF it ends up corrupt. It's a hassle I don't have time to sort out right now.
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.