Author Topic: Review of the New Domino XL DF 700 - Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3  (Read 83735 times)

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Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Review of the New Domino XL DF 700 - Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3
« Reply #90 on: May 14, 2015, 04:53 AM »
When I made this Gate:



I laid it out dry to mark then cut the brace to size. Then I marked the domino locations which went at right angles to the butting faces between the brace and the two uprights.

Peter

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Offline Holmz

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Re: Review of the New Domino XL DF 700 - Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3
« Reply #91 on: May 14, 2015, 05:07 AM »
Cheers Peter & Good morning.

I like it... it has a bit of a Greek or Egyptian look to it with the 'curled over' top part.
Is that side the latch side or the hinge side?
Looks like the small side convieniently was nestled up in the same piece of wood as the curled-over side emerged from(?).

And is it about 3" thick on the square side?
I am beginning to think that my idea of using 2"x2"s might be a bit undersized for a large gate?
But I am gathering some insight, and appreciated the DX-700 videos from the beginning of the thread.

Randal

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Review of the New Domino XL DF 700 - Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3
« Reply #92 on: May 14, 2015, 05:46 AM »
Hi Randal

It was too long ago to remember how the various bits of wood were cut but there is a chance that the two uprights were part of the same piece. Yes it is about 3" thick. For a traditional 5 bar gate you do need quite substantial pieces and 2" thick would not give you the strength or the room for the various components of the gate.

The latch side is the smaller piece. If you send me your email address via PM I will forward the plans to you free of charge.

I think that the gate expert here on the FOG is Guy Ashley.

Peter

Offline bump

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Re: Review of the New Domino XL DF 700 - Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3
« Reply #93 on: October 25, 2016, 11:22 AM »
woo hoo! took delivery of the domino 700 a few hours ago.
decision to go for it was partly based upon watching these tube movies earlier in the year.
i have wrestled with the notion of paying out so much money for a tool that essentially cuts holes...
nobody in their right mind would heft out such a large sum of money for a hole cutter then slate it.
so i guess that irrespective of what happens from here on in, this awesome piece of craftmanship will be loved no matter what.
"it's gotta be good because it's so expensive!"
i have loads of projects to do, from building a new kitchen and worktops, through refurbing 100 year old sash windows and frames to making over 20 doors for the house. after that i am looking to build a new property for myself and one for my geese, so the domino is going to see several years of hard graft.
after which i shall no doubt find more things to do with it.
i am also chewing over how i might use it for creating sculptures too. i have a couple of ideas using completely different methods...
anyhoo, thanks for posting these great videos, they have helped to lighten my pocket somewhat.

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Review of the New Domino XL DF 700 - Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3
« Reply #94 on: October 25, 2016, 12:57 PM »
woo hoo! took delivery of the domino 700 a few hours ago.
decision to go for it was partly based upon watching these tube movies earlier in the year.
i have wrestled with the notion of paying out so much money for a tool that essentially cuts holes...
nobody in their right mind would heft out such a large sum of money for a hole cutter then slate it.
so i guess that irrespective of what happens from here on in, this awesome piece of craftmanship will be loved no matter what.
"it's gotta be good because it's so expensive!"
i have loads of projects to do, from building a new kitchen and worktops, through refurbing 100 year old sash windows and frames to making over 20 doors for the house. after that i am looking to build a new property for myself and one for my geese, so the domino is going to see several years of hard graft.
after which i shall no doubt find more things to do with it.
i am also chewing over how i might use it for creating sculptures too. i have a couple of ideas using completely different methods...
anyhoo, thanks for posting these great videos, they have helped to lighten my pocket somewhat.

Well bumped Bump !

You might want to look at the Domino connector system - certainly useful for worktops and also beds and other furniture.

Welcome to the FOG.

Peter

Offline bump

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Re: Review of the New Domino XL DF 700 - Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3
« Reply #95 on: October 26, 2016, 02:32 PM »
woo hoo! took delivery of the domino 700 a few hours ago.
decision to go for it was partly based upon watching these tube movies earlier in the year.
i have wrestled with the notion of paying out so much money for a tool that essentially cuts holes...
nobody in their right mind would heft out such a large sum of money for a hole cutter then slate it.
so i guess that irrespective of what happens from here on in, this awesome piece of craftmanship will be loved no matter what.
"it's gotta be good because it's so expensive!"
i have loads of projects to do, from building a new kitchen and worktops, through refurbing 100 year old sash windows and frames to making over 20 doors for the house. after that i am looking to build a new property for myself and one for my geese, so the domino is going to see several years of hard graft.
after which i shall no doubt find more things to do with it.
i am also chewing over how i might use it for creating sculptures too. i have a couple of ideas using completely different methods...
anyhoo, thanks for posting these great videos, they have helped to lighten my pocket somewhat.

Well bumped Bump !

You might want to look at the Domino connector system - certainly useful for worktops and also beds and other furniture.

Welcome to the FOG.

Peter


thank you for the welcome peter,
oddly enough i had a pack of them inside the container when i opened it.
it didn't say it came with them.
anyhoo, i took a look at them and figured they would be useful for the cedar bed my daughter wants me to build her next year and possibly for assembling my cedar worktops for the kitchen. they are made from just over 2 inch thick cedar but it's cut from a single tree, so no joins or glued bits, it's all one piece. it's being built as an "L" shape into the room with a tree stump as the legs on one end.
the wood has been weighted and left indoors for the past 8 months to acclimatise and bend however it wants within limits.
i will probably get on with it around january or a touch later.

anyways, thanks for the heads up, i shall watch out for more of your very cool movies.
my daughter thinks you are one of the most entertaining craftsmen on the tube.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2016, 02:35 PM by bump »

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 239
Re: RE: Review of the New Domino XL DF 700 - Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3
« Reply #96 on: October 18, 2017, 12:29 AM »
Hi Paul and Everyone

As you can see the third and final part is now available up above.

In my conclusions I mention the cost of the Domino DF 700. Here in the UK it comes in at £924 and so is not cheap. But, a top of the range Lamello biscuit jointer (the TOP 21) is about £885. I really wish I had mentioned that I have not only sold my staionary morticing machine but also my top of the range Lamello - the latter having been bought about 12 years ago. Now I believe that the new Domino is far more capable than the Lamello and is only £50 more. If one takes into account the price of a reasonable staionary morticer and the Lamello you can get both the Domino DF 500 and the Domino DF 700 together for the same price.

It was Paul Marcel's video that persuaded me to get the DF 500. I hope that I can now help you come to terms with the fact that you really do need a DF 700 and buying makes such good sense. If you have £1000 in the bank the interest rate is below inflation so your money is losing value all the time. Now is the time to invest in something that you know you want and will make you feel good every time that you use it.

For UK members, keep an eye out for The Woodworker magazine as my written review of the new Domino will be in there soon followed by several other bits of Festool kit.

I am now going to give my workshop a makeover and try and get my new bench finished.

Thank you for taking an interest in my videos.

Peter

The DF 700 is $1980 Canadian Dollars.  Basically we’re paying the equivalent of £1201 GBP for a DF 700 in Canada.  You’re getting the XF 700 at a bargain compared to us.

You did a great job with the videos.  If Spielberg was directing your video would have been 213 minute long with 7 alternate endings.  The last thing you want is Spielberg directing your tool video.

You have a couple of Jump cuts in the videos.  You can smooth them out by using a 1/2 second fade to black and fade back into the next scene.

Depending on the video editor your using. You can insert 1 second black background video and put a transition 1/4 second fade-out and fade-in from each scene into the 1 second of black footage placed inbetween each clip. 

It’s a trick used on TV to fade in from commercials preventing jump cuts.  It will
add some extra polish to your videos.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2017, 12:39 AM by Steven Owen »