Author Topic: Diving in Head First  (Read 2221 times)

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Offline HowardH

  • Posts: 1088
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #30 on: October 12, 2017, 07:10 PM »
Having made several dozen end grained CB's over the last couple of years, I cannot strongly enough emphasize how tedious it's going to be to try to flatten a board with a RO 150, especially once the end grain has been turned up.  Maple, purple heart, walnut, my main choice of materials, are extremely hard and it takes a long while to flatten this way.  it's also very hard to be precise as well.  My suggestion is to get a decent planer and glue sacrificial boards to each end and then take very small bites.  The sacrificial boards will keep the end grain from splintering and I have had a lot of success doing this method.  Once they are flattened, then use the RO150 from 80 through 220.  They will come out as smooth as glass.

Howard H
The Dallas Texas Festool Fanatic!

Mark Twain:  "I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a letter approving of it." "If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything."

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Online GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 20
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #31 on: October 13, 2017, 11:21 AM »
Thank you for sharing your experience making end grain cutting boards.  I also plan to use the same species of wood in my cutting boards.  I'm really only familiar working with pine and plywood so I think I'm not appreciating how hard hardwoods can be.

I don't have the room for even a small surface planer, so I'll have to make do with a router sled to do the flattening.  I was also planning on getting the Festool hard pad to use with the sander I get (at this point I think ETS EC 150).
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Offline HowardH

  • Posts: 1088
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #32 on: October 13, 2017, 11:29 AM »
The router sled should work fine.  All you are really doing is getting it ready for the sanding.  You just don't want to end up with a board that "rocks" on a flat surface.  I always test mine out by laying it on top of a piece of granite.  Any inconsistences will be noticeable immediately.  Making end grain boards is really fun.  You should check out Andrei's YouTube channel.  MTMwood  He is a Russian who does breathtaking work and you can download plans very inexpensively. 
Howard H
The Dallas Texas Festool Fanatic!

Mark Twain:  "I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a letter approving of it." "If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything."

mft1080, Trion, MFT/3, T15, RO150FEQ, TS55, RTS400, CT22, 800, 1080, 1400, 1900 rails, CSX, Vecturo, Qwas dogs, Parf Dogs, Zobo's, Syslite Uni, Kreg router table

Online GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 20
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #33 on: October 13, 2017, 12:21 PM »
We already have some cheap bamboo cutting boards that are seriously warped and rock like crazy.  I feel like I'm cutting on a seesaw.

As much as I'd like to have a reversible cutting board (one side with a juice slot would be great), but it seems like most people put rubber feet on the bottom so that's what I plan to do as well.  I figure that the rubber feet might help deal with one side that isn't perfectly flat.

I have seen many of MTMwood's videos.  Some are really amazing and look rather complicated to get those patterns.  I just want to make a simple symmetrical checkerboard pattern for my first cutting board.
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