Author Topic: Diving in Head First  (Read 2145 times)

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Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Diving in Head First
« on: October 11, 2017, 06:33 PM »
I finally pulled the trigger and made my first Festool purchase(s).  I bought the CT26, TS55, and I had also ordered the ETS 150/5, but it was backordered.  I think I may have lucked out that it's backordered.  I was originally planning on buying the RO150 until I saw the price so I opted for the cheaper ETS 150/5.  After some more research and soul searching, I've come back to my original conclusion that I should buy the RO150.  I had always wanted an MFT/3, but thought I'd save my money and instead I made my own tracksaw cutting station using Peter Parfitt's UJK Par Guide Drilling System.

I haven't used the TS55 yet, but I am very impressed with how nice the Systainer is.  I have a bunch of various sized Bosch L-Boxxes just for random tool/part/supply storage, and the systainer just feels "nicer" to me.  I assembled the CT26 and turned it on to see what it's like.  What can I say?  It "sucks" - LOL.  The suction wasn't as strong as I thought would be, even at full suction.  I was pleasantly surprised by how quiet it is.  The size of the CT26 is probably bigger than I'd like, but from my research it seems like it's the best all around dust extractor compared to the CT Sys, Midi, or Mini.

I plan on making end grain cutting boards with my new Festool tools.  Yes, I know it would be much easier with a table saw, planer, drum sander, and who knows what other tools, but I am hellbent on making an end grain cutting board using only a CT26, TS55, RO150, and my homemade tracksaw cutting station.

-David
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2017, 06:40 PM »
Welcome to the FOG!

You did jump in headfirst.  We can be an enthusiastic bunch here so if you have questions, or need advice or help be prepared that you much get a lot!  [big grin]

Many of our members here have your tools and use them either professionally or semi-professionally or as a hobbyist.  In the olden days the term - operators are standing by - would have been used in this situation.  We are here to assist if desired.

Peter
Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 527
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2017, 06:47 PM »
Congrats!  Nice set of tools...

I think attempting to make a custom MFT is a good idea for a lot of folks.  The money just seems better spent elsewhere and you can get something that is better suited to your needs for a fraction of the cost.  And thanks to Peter's awesome system, getting an accurate top is easier than ever.  Make sure to take a look at various designs that are out there for custom MFTs.  Example, if you need portability, take a look at how Dan Pattison (MPT) or Timothy Wilmots (MFTC) have tackled that in their designs. 

I like the RO150 but for end-grain cutting boards, it wouldn't be my first choice for a handheld sander.  You want to be able to level and flatten and even a handheld belt sander (non-Festool) would be better.  Ideal would of course be access to a drum sander.  You could get a good Makita or Porter-Cable belt sander and the ETS150/5 for the price of the RO150.  I just don't see the RO as the ideal hand sander for end-grain cutting boards that might need a fair bit of leveling.  Still going to suggest finding someone with a drum sander as the best option...
"What you have to do tomorrow, do today.  What you have to do today, do now."  - a wise grandfather who was clearly talking about purchasing Festools

Offline Birdhunter

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2017, 09:23 PM »
My headlong dive into Festool was at a Festool event at Highland Woodworking in Atlanta. Two MFTs, TS55, Domino500 set, Midi, CSX, and a RO125. Never looked back. Gave all my DeWalt stuff to a beginner woodworking friend. Bunch of other Festool purchases since. Good stuff.
Birdhunter

Offline Holmz

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2017, 03:02 AM »
... I had also ordered the ETS 150/5, but it was backordered.  I think I may have lucked out that it's backordered.  I was originally planning on buying the RO150 until I saw the price so I opted for the cheaper ETS 150/5.  After some more research and soul searching, I've come back to my original conclusion that I should buy the RO150...

You have 30 days to return it in the US. It may be better to get both the RO and if the ETS is really an ETC/EC 150/5 then I doubt you would return that one... ;)

Offline ear3

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2017, 08:04 AM »
Congrats, good luck and welcome to the FOG.

Not sure if you have a chance to test drive any of the sanders at a local dealer, but if you're still wavering on the sander, you might also consider looking at the ETS/EC 150/5.  I understand that for the end grain cutting boards you want something pretty aggressive, and while the ETS-EC 150/5 doesn't equal the Rotex when the latter is in gear driven mode, it still packs a pretty big punch, and in fact, comparing them apples to apples when they are operating in Random Orbit mode, the ETS-EC 150/5 actually has a faster removal rate than the RO150.  For general purpose sanding, the low profile, balance and speed of the ETS-EC 150/5 makes it, IMHO, the best overall sander made by Festool.  But you certainly can't go wrong with the Rotex, as it will serve you well as a general purpose sander from low grit to finish, and if you have tasks that will involve a lot of stripping or removal, it may be the one you need most.
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Offline Wooden nickel

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2017, 08:14 AM »
Welcome,
I know you will enjoy this group.
They are active and you get responses wicked fast.
Always helpful.
I think the ones that are not professionals and as you said "jump in", tend to start with the idea of one project in mind.
But I assure you, if you have the passion as most of us do here you imagination and creativity will challenge your skills and put them to test on you work bench.
You will be pumping out tons of projects and again- this is a great group to guide you along the way.
Also ask for constructive criticism.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2017, 11:23 AM »
I like the RO150 but for end-grain cutting boards, it wouldn't be my first choice for a handheld sander.  You want to be able to level and flatten and even a handheld belt sander (non-Festool) would be better.  Ideal would of course be access to a drum sander.  You could get a good Makita or Porter-Cable belt sander and the ETS150/5 for the price of the RO150.  I just don't see the RO as the ideal hand sander for end-grain cutting boards that might need a fair bit of leveling.  Still going to suggest finding someone with a drum sander as the best option...

I do also have a Bosch router.  I have watched videos on YouTube showing how to make a sled that can be used to plane/flatten boards, but to me that process looks rather slow and tedious.  I think I may be greatly overestimating my ability to get my glue-ups fairly flat and even - hence my thinking I'll just need a "light sand" to smooth things out.
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Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2017, 11:28 AM »
You have 30 days to return it in the US. It may be better to get both the RO and if the ETS is really an ETC/EC 150/5 then I doubt you would return that one... ;)

The only problem I have with the 30 day return policy is that I ordered online and I'd hate the idea of having to pay the return shipping.  I have no idea how much it would cost to ship back, but sending something that heavy can't be that cheap.  In a perfect world I'd get both, but I'm really looking for "one sander to rule them all" or perhaps what realistically would be called "unobtainium."
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2017, 11:52 AM »
A few years ago I took time to do some personal woodworking.  I ended up making end grain cutting boards.  I gave them all away except for the one below.  Please note that this one is a personal size board made from scraps and intentionally cut off-kilter to play with one's eyes.

I ended up using a router sled with my OF1400 for the initial leveling and then finished off with my ETS150 working from very coarse to fine grits.  I did use a hard pad.

Peter

Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2017, 12:09 PM »
That's a nice looking cutting board Peter.  I feel like a lot of people make cutting boards to use up the smaller scrap pieces of wood they have from other projects.  I on the other hand am buying would solely to make cutting boards.

Do you think the router sled made the finishing process faster/easier as opposed to just sanding?
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2017, 12:19 PM »
That's a nice looking cutting board Peter.  I feel like a lot of people make cutting boards to use up the smaller scrap pieces of wood they have from other projects.  I on the other hand am buying would solely to make cutting boards.

Do you think the router sled made the finishing process faster/easier as opposed to just sanding?

Absolutely in my case.  I was able to glue up without the worry about absolute flatness on one side and then ended up with parallel top and bottom sides.

Peter

Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline live4ever

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2017, 12:44 PM »
The only problem I have with the 30 day return policy is that I ordered online and I'd hate the idea of having to pay the return shipping.  I have no idea how much it would cost to ship back, but sending something that heavy can't be that cheap.  In a perfect world I'd get both, but I'm really looking for "one sander to rule them all" or perhaps what realistically would be called "unobtainium."

One sander to rule them all?  Clearly you don't understand Festool's approach just yet...  [eek]

Router sled is a good bet.  Your biggest problem will be cutting strips of perfectly consistent width with the tracksaw.  Trust me it's no fun trying to sand that flat! 
"What you have to do tomorrow, do today.  What you have to do today, do now."  - a wise grandfather who was clearly talking about purchasing Festools

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2017, 12:59 PM »
Absolutely in my case.  I was able to glue up without the worry about absolute flatness on one side and then ended up with parallel top and bottom sides.

Maybe I should reconsider making a router sled.  I'll need to find a relatively simple design - some of the plans I saw used plexiglass, which I don't have and I don't really want to buy.  Do you happen to remember where you got your plans?
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Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #14 on: October 12, 2017, 01:13 PM »
One sander to rule them all?  Clearly you don't understand Festool's approach just yet...  [eek]

Router sled is a good bet.  Your biggest problem will be cutting strips of perfectly consistent width with the tracksaw.  Trust me it's no fun trying to sand that flat!

Yeah, I guess my cheapskate/simple approach contradicts Festool's approach.  I just realized that using cheapskate and Festool in the same sentence is probably an oxymoron.

Hmm consistent widths is going to be a problem??  I had planned to setup some kind of stop block on my custom made tracksaw cutting station.   I haven't actually thought about how it will really work - I only have the very rough high level vision of a stop of some kind in my head.  I saw a cutting board video on YouTube where they were using the waste side to make the strips because they were cutting narrow stock.
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2017, 01:54 PM »
Absolutely in my case.  I was able to glue up without the worry about absolute flatness on one side and then ended up with parallel top and bottom sides.

Maybe I should reconsider making a router sled.  I'll need to find a relatively simple design - some of the plans I saw used plexiglass, which I don't have and I don't really want to buy.  Do you happen to remember where you got your plans?

Mine was made out of scrap.  The sled itself was just a scrap of plywood with a hole drilled in it.  Mounted the router to that.  The base that held the workpiece was scrap plywood.  The runners were scraps of uni-strut screwed down.  The clamps were opposing wedges tightened and screwed down.

Nothing elegant but it worked.

Peter
Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2017, 02:05 PM »
Mine was made out of scrap.  The sled itself was just a scrap of plywood with a hole drilled in it.  Mounted the router to that.  The base that held the workpiece was scrap plywood.  The runners were scraps of uni-strut screwed down.  The clamps were opposing wedges tightened and screwed down.

Nothing elegant but it worked.

I see, I think I'm overthinking/over complicating the design of the sled.  I guess the key thing is that the runners or guides are exact matches that are parallel to each other.
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Offline Sparktrician

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #17 on: October 12, 2017, 02:10 PM »
Mine was made out of scrap.  The sled itself was just a scrap of plywood with a hole drilled in it.  Mounted the router to that.  The base that held the workpiece was scrap plywood.  The runners were scraps of uni-strut screwed down.  The clamps were opposing wedges tightened and screwed down.

Nothing elegant but it worked.

I see, I think I'm overthinking/over complicating the design of the sled.  I guess the key thing is that the runners or guides are exact matches that are parallel to each other.

You might want to look through issue #222 of Fine Woodworking for an article by Nick Offerman on his design for a router sled.  You can see a photo of it here
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Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 527
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #18 on: October 12, 2017, 02:21 PM »
Yeah, I guess my cheapskate/simple approach contradicts Festool's approach.  I just realized that using cheapskate and Festool in the same sentence is probably an oxymoron.

Hmm consistent widths is going to be a problem??  I had planned to setup some kind of stop block on my custom made tracksaw cutting station.   I haven't actually thought about how it will really work - I only have the very rough high level vision of a stop of some kind in my head.  I saw a cutting board video on YouTube where they were using the waste side to make the strips because they were cutting narrow stock.

We are all cheapskates here.  It's just that Festool makes a lot of nice machines, and if you are trying to get one of them to do what others do even better, you're depriving yourself of the pleasure that comes from having the best tool for the job.  At least that's how they've warped my brain into thinking.  LOL.  But in all seriousness, while the RO is a really amazing and versatile sander, it's not a great finish sander compared to other sanders in Festool's lineup (ETS, ETS-ECs, RTS/DTS...).  And in woodworking, most of what you do is finish sand.  So I don't see the RO as the only sander I'd like to own.  Just my opinion of course.  It still might be the first sander for you, but it ain't gonna be your last.   [scared]

Consistent widths is no problem in theory, but it's inherently going to be less perfect than say, a tablesaw with a good fence.  On a cutting board, even one hundredth of an inch difference strip to strip will give you something that needs to be routered or sanded out.  The approach should work fine as long as you have a way to deal with any unevenness you end up with - in your case the router sled.  Or a buddy with a drum sander.  Yes, you'd be able to slowly even out the board with the Rotex, but your result is likely to be smooth but a little wavier than the dead-nuts flat you'll get with other approaches.

I don't know if this is a one-off or few-off project for you or if you plan on making a lot of these, but usually folks that make lots of cutting boards end up with a drum sander for good reason.  Oh, did I mention we're really good at spending your money here?
"What you have to do tomorrow, do today.  What you have to do today, do now."  - a wise grandfather who was clearly talking about purchasing Festools

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #19 on: October 12, 2017, 02:36 PM »
You might want to look through issue #222 of Fine Woodworking for an article by Nick Offerman on his design for a router sled.  You can see a photo of it here.

Thanks for that reference.  I just watched the Fine Woodworking's Tour Video of his workshop.  His big router sled is quite impressive.
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Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2017, 03:10 PM »
We are all cheapskates here.  It's just that Festool makes a lot of nice machines, and if you are trying to get one of them to do what others do even better, you're depriving yourself of the pleasure that comes from having the best tool for the job.  At least that's how they've warped my brain into thinking.  LOL.  But in all seriousness, while the RO is a really amazing and versatile sander, it's not a great finish sander compared to other sanders in Festool's lineup (ETS, ETS-ECs, RTS/DTS...).  And in woodworking, most of what you do is finish sand.  So I don't see the RO as the only sander I'd like to own.  Just my opinion of course.  It still might be the first sander for you, but it ain't gonna be your last.   [scared]

Consistent widths is no problem in theory, but it's inherently going to be less perfect than say, a tablesaw with a good fence.  On a cutting board, even one hundredth of an inch difference strip to strip will give you something that needs to be routered or sanded out.  The approach should work fine as long as you have a way to deal with any unevenness you end up with - in your case the router sled.  Or a buddy with a drum sander.  Yes, you'd be able to slowly even out the board with the Rotex, but your result is likely to be smooth but a little wavier than the dead-nuts flat you'll get with other approaches.

I don't know if this is a one-off or few-off project for you or if you plan on making a lot of these, but usually folks that make lots of cutting boards end up with a drum sander for good reason.  Oh, did I mention we're really good at spending your money here?

Maybe ETS EC 150/5 would be a better first choice.  I do like that it's $110 cheaper than the RO150.

Let's see how well or unwell the first cutting board turns out.  LOL - this could turn into a big disaster.   I have delusions of grandeur of going into the mass production end grain cutting board business, but I know I'm completely unequipped to do that and I'd never really make money selling them.
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Offline johnbro

  • Posts: 126
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #21 on: October 12, 2017, 03:10 PM »
Congrats!  Nice set of tools...

I think attempting to make a custom MFT is a good idea for a lot of folks.  The money just seems better spent elsewhere and you can get something that is better suited to your needs for a fraction of the cost.  And thanks to Peter's awesome system, getting an accurate top is easier than ever.  Make sure to take a look at various designs that are out there for custom MFTs.  Example, if you need portability, take a look at how Dan Pattison (MPT) or Timothy Wilmots (MFTC) have tackled that in their designs. 

I like the RO150 but for end-grain cutting boards, it wouldn't be my first choice for a handheld sander.  You want to be able to level and flatten and even a handheld belt sander (non-Festool) would be better.  Ideal would of course be access to a drum sander.  You could get a good Makita or Porter-Cable belt sander and the ETS150/5 for the price of the RO150.  I just don't see the RO as the ideal hand sander for end-grain cutting boards that might need a fair bit of leveling.  Still going to suggest finding someone with a drum sander as the best option...

Have to agree on the RO150 for cutting boards--BTDT and you'll spend a lifetime flattening end-grain hardwoods even with 24grit paper. Belt sander is much better for initial flattening. I have both the RO150 and the ETS150 (makes sense TO ME to have them share paper). The Rotex is a great sander (they both are) but it's big and heavy. The ETS is a little easier on the hands, arms, and ears for doing lots of sanding.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #22 on: October 12, 2017, 03:42 PM »
Have to agree on the RO150 for cutting boards--BTDT and you'll spend a lifetime flattening end-grain hardwoods even with 24grit paper. Belt sander is much better for initial flattening. I have both the RO150 and the ETS150 (makes sense TO ME to have them share paper). The Rotex is a great sander (they both are) but it's big and heavy. The ETS is a little easier on the hands, arms, and ears for doing lots of sanding.

I think I'm going to need to make the router sled then.  I just watched Matt Cremona's router sled and I really like its simplicity.  It sounds like the ETS EC 150/5 will be a good sander if I'm using the router sled. 
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Offline live4ever

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Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #23 on: October 12, 2017, 04:55 PM »
Good plan.  BTW, you may know this, but you're going to get track marks from the routing unless you use a dish cutter bit instead of a regular straight cutter.  You'll be able to sand those out, but it may be worth investing in a wide dish cutter bit if you plan on doing this a lot.   

Also, you can save a little more money if you go with the standard ETS 150/5 instead of the EC.  In terms of sanding capabilities and results, they will be very similar - both are plenty powerful enough and both have the same 5mm stroke.  With the EC you're paying for the different form factor, improved (?) ergonomics, and brushless motor.  Those may be worth it to many people, but in the beginning when you're trying to stretch that dollar, I'm not convinced you need to spend the extra.  The ETS is a tried and true and much loved sander.  JMHO, looking at it from the perspective of someone trying to spend as wisely as possible since there are so many toys to buy when starting out.
"What you have to do tomorrow, do today.  What you have to do today, do now."  - a wise grandfather who was clearly talking about purchasing Festools

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #24 on: October 12, 2017, 05:07 PM »
Good plan.  BTW, you may know this, but you're going to get track marks from the routing unless you use a dish cutter bit instead of a regular straight cutter.  You'll be able to sand those out, but it may be worth investing in a wide dish cutter bit if you plan on doing this a lot.   

Also, you can save a little more money if you go with the standard ETS 150/5 instead of the EC.  In terms of sanding capabilities and results, they will be very similar - both are plenty powerful enough and both have the same 5mm stroke.  With the EC you're paying for the different form factor, improved (?) ergonomics, and brushless motor.  Those may be worth it to many people, but in the beginning when you're trying to stretch that dollar, I'm not convinced you need to spend the extra.  The ETS is a tried and true and much loved sander.  JMHO, looking at it from the perspective of someone trying to spend as wisely as possible since there are so many toys to buy when starting out.

I did not know that about the router bit.  Honestly, router bits confuse me - upcut, downcut, spiral, all different types of router bits.  I think I was planning on getting the Freud 16-608 1 1/4" Mortising Bit (I'm trying to only buy Freud bits).  Do you know if that's the type of bit you were referring to?

LOL - talk about coming full circle.  As I mentioned I originally ordered the ETS 150, but it's backordered from the online store that I bought it from.  I selected the ETS 150 because it was cheaper than the ETS EC 150, but I didn't really fully understand the differences until after I placed my order.  I personally like the way the ETS EC 150 looks compared to the ETS 150 (I'm rather superficial when it comes to certain things).
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Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3879
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2017, 05:38 PM »
The ETS/EC 150/5 is the Porsche of the line up.

The RO are like a 4x4 school bus with a pickup bed on the backwith wings on it... So yeah it technically does it all...
But then they say ugly still need 5+ sanders...

If you are doing slabs then getting them at with a router sled is a decent way. An RO-# is slower than a belt sander and easier to have the surface wavy.

A hand plane is worth using too.

I am not really a sander guy but I still have 4 unique sanders. (Belt, 1/2-sheet, random orbital, corner) I use a Makita with a flap wheel for caveman things.
And I have two vacuum hand sanding blocks...
But I am more of a Porsche + Cessna + dump truck sort of guy... Rather

You will likely need hand planes and scrapers or a few unique sanders.
Your results my vary.

Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 527
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2017, 05:58 PM »
I did not know that about the router bit.  Honestly, router bits confuse me - upcut, downcut, spiral, all different types of router bits.  I think I was planning on getting the Freud 16-608 1 1/4" Mortising Bit (I'm trying to only buy Freud bits).  Do you know if that's the type of bit you were referring to?

LOL - talk about coming full circle.  As I mentioned I originally ordered the ETS 150, but it's backordered from the online store that I bought it from.  I selected the ETS 150 because it was cheaper than the ETS EC 150, but I didn't really fully understand the differences until after I placed my order.  I personally like the way the ETS EC 150 looks compared to the ETS 150 (I'm rather superficial when it comes to certain things).

A mortising bit is different.  It has sharp corners at the bottom to leave sharp corners in the work (think like a mortise for a door hinge).  Since it's a wide flat bit, it also works great on a sled BUT those sharp corners leave little tracks in the work as you go back and forth.  Dish carving bits (sorry, I may have confused by calling it a dish cutter) are just like mortise bits except they are radiused and thus they don't make perfectly sharp corners but rounded ones, like you might see on the inside of a dish or tray.  You certainly wouldn't use them to make a mortise for something like a hinge, but the lack of sharp corners makes them far better for use on a router sled.
https://www.amazon.com/Freud-99-026-4-Inch-Diameter-Carving/dp/B00004T7M5

Sometimes they are also called "Bowl & Tray" bits especially when they have a bearing to use with a template.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 06:00 PM by live4ever »
"What you have to do tomorrow, do today.  What you have to do today, do now."  - a wise grandfather who was clearly talking about purchasing Festools

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2017, 06:07 PM »
The ETS/EC 150/5 is the Porsche of the line up.

The RO are like a 4x4 school bus with a pickup bed on the backwith wings on it... So yeah it technically does it all...
But then they say ugly still need 5+ sanders...

If you are doing slabs then getting them at with a router sled is a decent way. An RO-# is slower than a belt sander and easier to have the surface wavy.

A hand plane is worth using too.

I am not really a sander guy but I still have 4 unique sanders. (Belt, 1/2-sheet, random orbital, corner) I use a Makita with a flap wheel for caveman things.
And I have two vacuum hand sanding blocks...
But I am more of a Porsche + Cessna + dump truck sort of guy... Rather

You will likely need hand planes and scrapers or a few unique sanders.
Your results my vary.

I like your analogies.

A mortising bit is different.  It has sharp corners at the bottom to leave sharp corners in the work (think like a mortise for a door hinge).  Since it's a wide flat bit, it also works great on a sled BUT those sharp corners leave little tracks in the work as you go back and forth.  Dish carving bits (sorry, I may have confused by calling it a dish cutter) are just like mortise bits except they are radiused and thus they don't make perfectly sharp corners but rounded ones, like you might see on the inside of a dish or tray.  You certainly wouldn't use them to make a mortise for something like a hinge, but the lack of sharp corners makes them far better for use on a router sled.
https://www.amazon.com/Freud-99-026-4-Inch-Diameter-Carving/dp/B00004T7M5

Sometimes they are also called "Bowl & Tray" bits especially when they have a bearing to use with a template.

Thanks for clarifying that.  I didn't realize that the mortising bit would leave little tracks behind.  I guess I should get that Freud Dish Carving bit.
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Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3289
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #28 on: October 12, 2017, 06:14 PM »
@GoingMyWay Take a look at the different router sleds FOG members have made in this thread, some very complex, some very simple.

http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-jigs-tool-enhancements/router-planing-sled/

BTW, having used both the ETS and the ETS-EC 150, I much prefer the EC, both in terms of form and in terms of function.  The sanding pad brake may sound like a gimmick, but it's actually very useful.
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Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 16
Re: Diving in Head First
« Reply #29 on: October 12, 2017, 06:36 PM »
@GoingMyWay Take a look at the different router sleds FOG members have made in this thread, some very complex, some very simple.

http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-jigs-tool-enhancements/router-planing-sled/

BTW, having used both the ETS and the ETS-EC 150, I much prefer the EC, both in terms of form and in terms of function.  The sanding pad brake may sound like a gimmick, but it's actually very useful.

Thanks for the link.  I like the same design that you did: http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-jigs-tool-enhancements/router-planing-sled/msg360850/#msg360850.  Only problem with that design is I'd need to buy the angle iron and the knobs.

Matt Cremona's sled is about as basic as you can get: http://assets.manmadediy.com/photos/26894/Screenshot_large.jpg

Now it sounds like ETS EC 150/5 is the sander for me.
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