Author Topic: Festool Sander Guide  (Read 25726 times)

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Offline SRSemenza

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Festool Sander Guide
« on: March 12, 2017, 01:55 PM »
Here is a link to a well done guide to help choose the right Festool sander.

                http://topcoatreview.com/2017/03/which-festool-sander/

Seth

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Offline Scott Burt

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2017, 03:31 PM »
Here is a link to a well done guide to help choose the right Festool sander.

                http://topcoatreview.com/2017/03/which-festool-sander/

Seth

Wow, thanks for sharing, Seth.

I am happy to help people figure them out. And there are many users here who also know a great deal about the sanders.

Offline Brian Livingstone

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2017, 02:44 PM »
Hi Scott,

I really found this to be helpful.  I bought the LS130 last week for a stair refinish project. 

Took me a good thirty minutes to figure out how to change the pads.  Doh !

Thanks for the good work.

Brian
Kapex, TS75, MFT, OF1010, OF2200, DTS400 REQ, Parallel guide rails, 800, 1080, 1400, 1900, 3000 guide rail, Domino 500, CT36, CT Midi, , RS2E, RO150, Boom Arm, Crown stops, 6 drawer Sortainer, Carvex, Syslite II, Festool safety glasses must start to wear.

Offline Scott Burt

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2017, 07:00 PM »
Hi Scott,

I really found this to be helpful.  I bought the LS130 last week for a stair refinish project. 

Took me a good thirty minutes to figure out how to change the pads.  Doh !

Thanks for the good work.

Brian

Glad to hear it, Brian. Yes, the LS130 IS the stair master!!
« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 04:52 AM by Scott Burt »

Offline ben_r_

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2017, 03:59 PM »
Excellent. Ill be directing some folks to this.
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline jtwood

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2017, 12:04 AM »
A terrific reference.  Thanks for posting.

Steve

Offline Midnight Man

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2017, 08:21 AM »
Thank you for sharing this guide!

I've recently come back to setting up a workshop (life got in the way the past 12 months), and have just started kitting out with Festool equipment, sanders were on my list to research tonight.

As it happens, this guide opened my eyes to the RTS400, which I believe will actually suit me better than the RTS300 I was looking at - so my heartfelt thanks for a very timely post  [smile]

Offline Scott Burt

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2017, 11:40 AM »
Thanks for the feedback, guys. I am glad to hear that you are finding the information helpful.

Offline jdw101

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2017, 09:05 AM »
Thanks for the feedback, guys. I am glad to hear that you are finding the information helpful.

Thank you for the guide, it was very enjoyable to read!  I ended up buying a Rotex Ro 125 before I read this guide about two weeks ago (already have an older ETS 150/5 EQ) and I probably would not have purchased it had I read your guide first and gone for something else.  I mainly do woodworking interior like cabinets and furniture.  My 5/50 was a used hand-me-down from my brother who has every festool made x 2 or 3 and so I never really even learned how to purchase a Festool sander.

It bums me out, I love the 125, the idea of it, I won't be doing any exterior sanding, none.  I hope that it works for me but I'll still keep it and just buy another one, the idea of giving it up now bothers me :|  Can't I just pretend it's great for cabinets and furniture?   I guess the 90 would have been a smart one to get, that's next if so!

Offline Scott Burt

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2017, 09:08 PM »
Thanks for the feedback, guys. I am glad to hear that you are finding the information helpful.

Thank you for the guide, it was very enjoyable to read!  I ended up buying a Rotex Ro 125 before I read this guide about two weeks ago (already have an older ETS 150/5 EQ) and I probably would not have purchased it had I read your guide first and gone for something else.  I mainly do woodworking interior like cabinets and furniture.  My 5/50 was a used hand-me-down from my brother who has every festool made x 2 or 3 and so I never really even learned how to purchase a Festool sander.

It bums me out, I love the 125, the idea of it, I won't be doing any exterior sanding, none.  I hope that it works for me but I'll still keep it and just buy another one, the idea of giving it up now bothers me :|  Can't I just pretend it's great for cabinets and furniture?   I guess the 90 would have been a smart one to get, that's next if so!

I love the RO125 as a tool, and it can do a lot for you in the finish realm, albeit bulky and requiring some technique to balance. It will excel on horizontals for you.

I see a DTS400 in your future.

Offline Holmz

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2017, 03:32 AM »
I did not see the BS series in there...

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2017, 06:35 AM »
I did not see the BS series in there...

Scott is based in North America.  The BS series of sanders are not offered by Festool here.

Peter

Offline Holmz

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2017, 06:50 AM »
I did not see the BS series in there...

Scott is based in North America.  The BS series of sanders are not offered by Festool here.

Peter

That makes sense now.

Offline Naildrivingman

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2017, 08:44 PM »
So I read the link.  I’m really drawn to the RO90, but the cost seems high for the need I have to fill (delta pad work).  I’m tempted to go the DTS 400, but I’ve read that the point wears outs much quicker than the rest of the paper.  I have a Fein multimaster and the detail work I’ve done with it is acceptable, but not great.  I’m currently running a Pro5 and RO150. I use the 150 for 80 grit cut on new material to remove mill marks and I finish with the Pro5 to 120 or finer.

Ultimately, I think the RO90 is overkill simply for detail work.  I think the DTS400 will be next and the ETS150/3 will round out my stable.  If my Pro5 craps out, I will probably replace it with an ETS125 REQ

I am open to other suggestions.
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Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2017, 11:56 PM »
So I read the link.  I’m really drawn to the RO90, but the cost seems high for the need I have to fill (delta pad work).  I’m tempted to go the DTS 400, but I’ve read that the point wears outs much quicker than the rest of the paper.  I have a Fein multimaster and the detail work I’ve done with it is acceptable, but not great.  I’m currently running a Pro5 and RO150. I use the 150 for 80 grit cut on new material to remove mill marks and I finish with the Pro5 to 120 or finer.

Ultimately, I think the RO90 is overkill simply for detail work.  I think the DTS400 will be next and the ETS150/3 will round out my stable.  If my Pro5 craps out, I will probably replace it with an ETS125 REQ

I am open to other suggestions.


       I have an RO90. I use it as a "jack of all trades" site work sander. The fact that it is small, random orbit, aggressive and delta makes it so I can just take one sander for most things. I keep a selection of delta and disk abrasives in the RO90 Sys which makes a handy single Sys - II package. If the job is a real sanding job or I know there is some particular or significant sanding, then I prefer others for non-  delta sanding tasks and take additional sanders.

    Things I personally don't like about the RO90 (round) ......... can be hard to keep flat (need to be paying attention),  I find it hard to keep the right pressure on the pad on narrow edges , and also harder to keep flat on edges than a larger pad.

     I don't have a DTS but I am pretty sure the RO90 (delta) has better reach than the DTS. And the extended reach pad for the RO90 (delta) is significant compared to the DTS. So that may be a consideration. I find the delta mode to be excellent.

  However the things that I both like and dislike are also exactly what allows it to do just about any sanding job .......... jack of all trades.

     Yes, the abrasive point does wear fast (er) which can be somewhat remedied by rotating the abrasive.

       Seth

Offline Naildrivingman

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #15 on: December 22, 2017, 10:53 AM »
So I read the link.  I’m really drawn to the RO90, but the cost seems high for the need I have to fill (delta pad work).  I’m tempted to go the DTS 400, but I’ve read that the point wears outs much quicker than the rest of the paper.  I have a Fein multimaster and the detail work I’ve done with it is acceptable, but not great.  I’m currently running a Pro5 and RO150. I use the 150 for 80 grit cut on new material to remove mill marks and I finish with the Pro5 to 120 or finer.

Ultimately, I think the RO90 is overkill simply for detail work.  I think the DTS400 will be next and the ETS150/3 will round out my stable.  If my Pro5 craps out, I will probably replace it with an ETS125 REQ

I am open to other suggestions.


       I have an RO90. I use it as a "jack of all trades" site work sander. The fact that it is small, random orbit, aggressive and delta makes it so I can just take one sander for most things. I keep a selection of delta and disk abrasives in the RO90 Sys which makes a handy single Sys - II package. If the job is a real sanding job or I know there is some particular or significant sanding, then I prefer others for non-  delta sanding tasks and take additional sanders.

    Things I personally don't like about the RO90 (round) ......... can be hard to keep flat (need to be paying attention),  I find it hard to keep the right pressure on the pad on narrow edges , and also harder to keep flat on edges than a larger pad.

     I don't have a DTS but I am pretty sure the RO90 (delta) has better reach than the DTS. And the extended reach pad for the RO90 (delta) is significant compared to the DTS. So that may be a consideration. I find the delta mode to be excellent.

  However the things that I both like and dislike are also exactly what allows it to do just about any sanding job .......... jack of all trades.

     Yes, the abrasive point does wear fast (er) which can be somewhat remedied by rotating the abrasive.

       Seth

So I read the link.  I’m really drawn to the RO90, but the cost seems high for the need I have to fill (delta pad work).  I’m tempted to go the DTS 400, but I’ve read that the point wears outs much quicker than the rest of the paper.  I have a Fein multimaster and the detail work I’ve done with it is acceptable, but not great.  I’m currently running a Pro5 and RO150. I use the 150 for 80 grit cut on new material to remove mill marks and I finish with the Pro5 to 120 or finer.

Ultimately, I think the RO90 is overkill simply for detail work.  I think the DTS400 will be next and the ETS150/3 will round out my stable.  If my Pro5 craps out, I will probably replace it with an ETS125 REQ

I am open to other suggestions.

Thanks @SRSemenza

I have steered away from the RO90 because I don’t see myself using the round pad as much as the Delta for the tipsy reason.  You mention that you think the 90 gets into tighter spots than the 400 because of its reach. I get that. Do you find that the overall length of the tool gets in the way ever?  That may be another reason for me to consider the 400. From a leverage standpoint, I can see the tip of the 90 delta digging in faster and easier than the 400.

All in all, I really like the RO150 as my general go to sander. My need for detail work is not great, but when I need a detail tool...I REALLY need one.  My Fein MM works ok, but it can really dig in fast. I have to be Uber careful with it.

Does anyone have a condensed description of what the functions are for the various accessory pads?  I typically use what came on the tool.  The standard pad has served me well, but I should have knowledge on what the others do.

Thanks so far for advice.




Edit> fixed quote box for clarity
« Last Edit: December 22, 2017, 11:10 AM by SRSemenza »
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Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #16 on: December 22, 2017, 11:23 AM »


Thanks @SRSemenza

I have steered away from the RO90 because I don’t see myself using the round pad as much as the Delta for the tipsy reason.  You mention that you think the 90 gets into tighter spots than the 400 because of its reach. I get that. Do you find that the overall length of the tool gets in the way ever?  That may be another reason for me to consider the 400. From a leverage standpoint, I can see the tip of the 90 delta digging in faster and easier than the 400.

All in all, I really like the RO150 as my general go to sander. My need for detail work is not great, but when I need a detail tool...I REALLY need one.  My Fein MM works ok, but it can really dig in fast. I have to be Uber careful with it.

Does anyone have a condensed description of what the functions are for the various accessory pads?  I typically use what came on the tool.  The standard pad has served me well, but I should have knowledge on what the others do.

Thanks so far for advice.




Yes, I have had the length get in the way a couple times, not prevent use completely but get in the way. It certainly could prevent use. On the other hand the length is useful when trying to smooth out some inside corner or harder to reach spot (both length / style of tool and length of pad). I find that I get very good control using it on details. Easy to poke the tip into something, hold , maneuver in places where I think a palm grip could be difficult.

I haven't had a problem with the tip digging in too much. Tool shape makes it easy to control in that respect. And I   think   visibility might be better than the DTS when reaching into a detail spot.

It really comes down to specifics of the sanding situation as to whether the DTS or RO90 is the right/best tool  for the job.

BTW, it isn't that the round pad isn't generally good it just depends the task coupled with personal preference.

Seth

Offline ScotF

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #17 on: December 22, 2017, 05:22 PM »
I have them both and they both excel at different things. The DTS shines when sanding next to an edge as the pad is rounded and the sander does not skitter away where as the RO does not work as well. The RO has a hard and soft option and an extended option, so it can get into tighter areas - it is lower profile than the DTS, but the DTS is much shorter in length - both have advantages/disadvantages.

I prefer the DTS when sanding on edges of material as the orbital does not tend to want to walk off the edge as easily as with an RO type sander.

I do not have issues with either digging into material - they both work well. The key with the RO I have found is to hold one end by the cord and the other hand on the front and it is easy to control and keep flat. The DTS is very easy to use one-handed.

Both have their place IMHO.

Offline Brian Livingstone

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #18 on: December 22, 2017, 06:43 PM »
Hi Scott,

Here is my inventory:

RO150- surprised how much I use it.
RS2 - use it a lot.
LS130- I don’t use it a lot, but when I use it, I love it.
DTS 400 REQ- use it a lot.

Thinking about the RTS400 REQ.  Does it make sense with the DTS ?
Definitely want the ETS EC150/3

Might get the RO125.

Sold my RO90.  Don’t miss it.

Cabinetmaker, furniture maker, generalist.

Thanks.
Kapex, TS75, MFT, OF1010, OF2200, DTS400 REQ, Parallel guide rails, 800, 1080, 1400, 1900, 3000 guide rail, Domino 500, CT36, CT Midi, , RS2E, RO150, Boom Arm, Crown stops, 6 drawer Sortainer, Carvex, Syslite II, Festool safety glasses must start to wear.

Offline Scott Burt

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #19 on: December 23, 2017, 11:28 AM »
Hi Scott,

Here is my inventory:

RO150- surprised how much I use it.
RS2 - use it a lot.
LS130- I don’t use it a lot, but when I use it, I love it.
DTS 400 REQ- use it a lot.

Thinking about the RTS400 REQ.  Does it make sense with the DTS ?
Definitely want the ETS EC150/3

Might get the RO125.

Sold my RO90.  Don’t miss it.

Cabinetmaker, furniture maker, generalist.

Thanks.

Hi Brian

You have a good stable for your work, it sounds like. I too love Rotex, and mostly when I need power. I rarely use any of the Rotex in orbital mode (with the exception of the 90 delta). I find them to be a bit cumbersome compared to the sportier 3mm and 5mm stroke ec tec lines. The 150/5 is one of my most frequent grabs.

I totally agree on the LS130. Don't need it often, but when you need it, nothing else will do. I have found more uses than I thought, such as sanding crown on exteriors (which I know you don't probably do).

RS2 is a sweetheart for tops and large surfaces, for sure. The gentle giant.

Now, in my work (which is a variety of everything from serious cabinet grade to rough exterior work), the DTS400 is usually in my stack and I usually try to work with just two sanders a day (hard sometimes), so I am always looking for the right two, and the DTS is usually one of the two.

In my opinion, the RTS400 is a great little sander, but perhaps somewhat redundant since you have the DTS. The DTS can do most everything that the RTS can do, while there are many things the DTS can do that the RTS can't. DTS is more versatile.

It always boils down to knowing what type of work you do and HOW you want to work, when selecting your ideal fleet.

I do use the RTS alot but mostly when it is specific to face frames or square stock that is exactly the size of the RTS pad. You can take it into corners, but not with the finesse of the DTS. However, you do already have the LS, so it would share abrasives with that, and not require to stock a new abrasive line, that is convenient.

So to make a short answer long, I would check out other useful options before pulling the trigger on a RTS. Check out the ec tecs, and you may also appreciate the extractable blocks. I use those things all the time at super high grits. There are some final sands (especially on clear finishes), that I just don't want to put a power sander on at all.

Hope this helps.

Offline Scott Burt

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #20 on: December 23, 2017, 11:40 AM »
So I read the link.  I’m really drawn to the RO90, but the cost seems high for the need I have to fill (delta pad work).  I’m tempted to go the DTS 400, but I’ve read that the point wears outs much quicker than the rest of the paper.  I have a Fein multimaster and the detail work I’ve done with it is acceptable, but not great.  I’m currently running a Pro5 and RO150. I use the 150 for 80 grit cut on new material to remove mill marks and I finish with the Pro5 to 120 or finer.

Ultimately, I think the RO90 is overkill simply for detail work.  I think the DTS400 will be next and the ETS150/3 will round out my stable.  If my Pro5 craps out, I will probably replace it with an ETS125 REQ

I am open to other suggestions.


       I have an RO90. I use it as a "jack of all trades" site work sander. The fact that it is small, random orbit, aggressive and delta makes it so I can just take one sander for most things. I keep a selection of delta and disk abrasives in the RO90 Sys which makes a handy single Sys - II package. If the job is a real sanding job or I know there is some particular or significant sanding, then I prefer others for non-  delta sanding tasks and take additional sanders.

    Things I personally don't like about the RO90 (round) ......... can be hard to keep flat (need to be paying attention),  I find it hard to keep the right pressure on the pad on narrow edges , and also harder to keep flat on edges than a larger pad.

     I don't have a DTS but I am pretty sure the RO90 (delta) has better reach than the DTS. And the extended reach pad for the RO90 (delta) is significant compared to the DTS. So that may be a consideration. I find the delta mode to be excellent.

  However the things that I both like and dislike are also exactly what allows it to do just about any sanding job .......... jack of all trades.

     Yes, the abrasive point does wear fast (er) which can be somewhat remedied by rotating the abrasive.

       Seth

Interesting discussion about Delta options. To me the RO90 delta is something I really only use in very low grits for removal in corners. I rarely think of it as a finish sanding best option. The BIGGEST issue with the RO90 in delta is that there is little to no extraction, so I refer to that set up as the dirty dog. I am willing to pull the hose and suck up the mess as I go, without turning off the sander.

From that standpoint, the DTS far exceeds the 90delta mode as a delta option. There are times I wish the DTS pad could be smaller. But overall, it is more than just a delta sander, its a great orbital, and I completely agree with you about the challenge of doing finesse work with the 90. That isn't it's strength. But it is a little beast that I would find hard to not have. I also do like the extended delta option on the 90, that is quite handy for those hard to reach but visible places.

The tip of the DTS abrasive does wear, because that tends to be the functionality that everyone goes after the most. We have to rely on the thickness of the abrasive backing (which varies by abrasive line and even grit), and really keep an eye on it. When heated up for extended periods, the base pad feels it. When it wears, the tip of the abrasive has no hook and loop super power, so it can float and wrinkle a bit, which then causes the dreaded swirls.

While the abrasive can't be rotated, I have trained myself to use the two points on the back end as tips to go into corners where they will fit. That is one work around to maximize abrasive life.

To me, these are good things. Tools are meant to be used. And parts, while at times pricy, can easily be replaced. For that matter, I also wear out round pads after a couple of seasons of hard use. Again, it is usually related to heat. Working outdoors in the summer creates hot friction on the hook and loop.

It is a good idea for all sander owners to ask for a spare backing pad for your #1 as a stocking stuffer.

« Last Edit: December 23, 2017, 11:44 AM by Scott Burt »

Offline ScotF

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #21 on: December 23, 2017, 03:20 PM »
Hi Scott,

Here is my inventory:

RO150- surprised how much I use it.
RS2 - use it a lot.
LS130- I don’t use it a lot, but when I use it, I love it.
DTS 400 REQ- use it a lot.

Thinking about the RTS400 REQ.  Does it make sense with the DTS ?
Definitely want the ETS EC150/3

Might get the RO125.

Sold my RO90.  Don’t miss it.

Cabinetmaker, furniture maker, generalist.

Thanks.

One thing I really like with the RTS is being able to add foam backing pads to it for contoured sanding. This is not an option on the DTS (I wish it were). But, this was a great way for me to sand 4 sets of dining chair legs and the RTS really earned its keep in this application. The round sanders would sometimes fly off the edge if I was not careful.

Offline RobBob

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #22 on: December 23, 2017, 03:28 PM »
Hi Scott,

Here is my inventory:

RO150- surprised how much I use it.
RS2 - use it a lot.
LS130- I don’t use it a lot, but when I use it, I love it.
DTS 400 REQ- use it a lot.

Thinking about the RTS400 REQ.  Does it make sense with the DTS ?
Definitely want the ETS EC150/3

Might get the RO125.

Sold my RO90.  Don’t miss it.

Cabinetmaker, furniture maker, generalist.

Thanks.

One thing I really like with the RTS is being able to add foam backing pads to it for contoured sanding. This is not an option on the DTS (I wish it were). But, this was a great way for me to sand 4 sets of dining chair legs and the RTS really earned its keep in this application. The round sanders would sometimes fly off the edge if I was not careful.

Can't you easily trim the RTS backing pads to match the DTS delta shape?

Offline ScotF

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #23 on: December 23, 2017, 03:38 PM »
I am not sure the base matches exactly and the DC holes would not line up - I suppose you could in theory do it since it is just foam and H&L backing.

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #24 on: December 26, 2017, 04:52 AM »
I did not see the BS series in there...

Scott is based in North America.  The BS series of sanders are not offered by Festool here.

Peter

That makes sense now.

Yes, that explains why it is not included in the guide,
but why are the BS 75 and BS 105 NAINA?

Were they ever and just not enough sales to justify keeping them in the lineup?

-----
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Offline Naildrivingman

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #25 on: December 27, 2017, 11:04 PM »
I started with the DTS 400.  Purchased it yesterday, used it today.  Something was wrong with it.  Regardless of speed of tool or intensity of suction, the sander jumped all over. Figuring it was a similar issue to the Pro 5, I brought it back for exchange only to find they had no more 400s in stock and to order would take 2-3 weeks. I opted for the RO90.

Lotsa sander for detail work, but I absolutely love my RO150,so I think the 90 will grow on me.

Interesting note, the local FT rep recommends Granat first and always for the 90, but prefers Rubin for the Pro5 and RO150 for bare wood sanding. I’ve been a Rubin fan since day 1.  I hope Granat does not grow on me...the cost and quantity/box offered can be daunting.
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Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #26 on: December 27, 2017, 11:09 PM »
I started with the DTS 400.  Purchased it yesterday, used it today.  Something was wrong with it.  Regardless of speed of tool or intensity of suction, the sander jumped all over. Figuring it was a similar issue to the Pro 5, I brought it back for exchange only to find they had no more 400s in stock and to order would take 2-3 weeks. I opted for the RO90.

Lotsa sander for detail work, but I absolutely love my RO150,so I think the 90 will grow on me.

Interesting note, the local FT rep recommends Granat first and always for the 90, but prefers Rubin for the Pro5 and RO150 for bare wood sanding. I’ve been a Rubin fan since day 1.  I hope Granat does not grow on me...the cost and quantity/box offered can be daunting.

Though I have used both Granat and Rubin on the RO90 delta. I haven't exactly tested this , but I think the Granat may have more durability on the points. I like Rubin for bare wood better than Granat most of the time. I like Granat for some things too but I am not a Granat is good / best for everything guy.

Seth

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #27 on: December 28, 2017, 08:59 AM »
Bought DTS 400 yesterday...didn’t perform well...brought it back today and exchanged for RO90.  SHEESH!!

If you need the acute angle feature, look for a DX 93. I have all 3 of the detail sanders and I like using the DX 93 the most. With some coarse grit paper on it, it can become quite aggressive. The DTS 400 is a nice finish sander while the RO 90 with the delta pad is kind of cumbersome to use for extended periods of time.

Offline Scott Burt

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Re: Festool Sander Guide
« Reply #28 on: May 22, 2018, 07:40 PM »
Hope everyone is having a great summer. I am working on an update to this guide to include sanders that have been introduced since its original publication.

In the meantime feel free to post up questions!