Author Topic: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge  (Read 2499 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline InspektorGadget

  • Posts: 5
Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« on: February 11, 2019, 12:22 PM »
I am a 34 year old hobbyist woodworker.  I do stuff for friends/family and around the house for my wife and myself.  All for fun and not for profit......I have a large walk in closet in my house, and after gaining the trust of my wife from other projects I've been tasked with doing built in cabinets/organization for said closet.

Being relatively young, I was considering buying some quality "buy it for life" type of tools like a Festool TS55, CT MIDI Extractor and Domino 500.  My thought is the track saw to break down the 16-20 sheets of MDF or Plywood.  A domino to do loose tenon joinery on the cabinet boxes, and a dust extractor to...Well, extract the dust. 

There are many other projects in the pipeline, but this closet is what spurned me to look into these tools.  It's a lot of money to spend on 2 tools and a vac, but I keep coming back to loving the system so much, and with a small shop I like the idea of the systainers portability, stackability and organization.

I'm really just looking for someone to tell me to jump, or not to jump...My shop is relatively well outfitted so there aren't any other tools I need at this time (aside from a jointer, but that's coming soon enough)

Would the dominos be a good way to build the cabinet boxes out of MDF?  Should I just use screws?  Is the track saw really better than a Triton?  Is the dust extraction worth $600? 

Sorry for random thoughts in this post, but I'm looking for some mentorship and tips from this community as you all seem very knowledgable, and eager to help.

Thanks!

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 797
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2019, 12:39 PM »
You've come to the right place for completely unbiased help.  :)

JUMP!!!  The water's just fine. 

The Festool system approach is by no means the cheapest, and sometimes not even the easiest.  But it is almost always the cleanest, often the most efficient, usually the most fun, and almost always the most expensive approach to projects. 

The system approach hurts initially due to the added cost, especially in the beginning when less expensive alternatives seem appealing.  But it pays dividends down the road as you accumulate more of it. 

You have many, many more projects in your future.  You'll probably enjoy them more if you jump in.
Current systainer to productivity ratio:  very high

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 5805
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2019, 12:59 PM »
Well, I dunno, but on a Festool forum, what kind of advice do you think you're going to get? But I guess you already knew that.  [wink]

I could whole-heartedly stand behind your choices, the Domino is a unique tool you won't find anywhere else. Sure, there's lots of other ways to put your furniture together. Screws also work fine, dowels work fine, biscuits work fine, but the Domino does have a way to make it easy and look good. Btw, I don't have a Domino myself, I just use screws and dowels. I would really like to have one but I don't have enough work for it to justify the cost.

The TS55 is also a good choice, one of the finest saws out there. Saws from other brands will also do fine if it's a respectable brand. I don't know Triton myself, but those from Makita or Bosch are also good. Don't know about their longevity though. I bought my older type TS55 used, it's 12 years old now and still feels like new.

The CT26 vac is a good vac, is it worth the $600, that's something only you can decide. I've had 4 Festool vacs by now, I don't find them especially more remarkable than vacs from any other brand. The auto start and variable suction are good features to have, but many other brands also offer that. I used to have the 26, but I sold it to get a 2nd CT Mini, the 26 was too big for my needs. I really like my Mini's because of the compact square form. Very easy to store and haul around.

Offline WoodworkTech

  • Posts: 145
    • My Personal Blog
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2019, 01:04 PM »
I am a 34 year old hobbyist woodworker.  I do stuff for friends/family and around the house for my wife and myself.  All for fun and not for profit......I have a large walk in closet in my house, and after gaining the trust of my wife from other projects I've been tasked with doing built in cabinets/organization for said closet.

Being relatively young, I was considering buying some quality "buy it for life" type of tools like a Festool TS55, CT MIDI Extractor and Domino 500.  My thought is the track saw to break down the 16-20 sheets of MDF or Plywood.  A domino to do loose tenon joinery on the cabinet boxes, and a dust extractor to...Well, extract the dust. 

There are many other projects in the pipeline, but this closet is what spurned me to look into these tools.  It's a lot of money to spend on 2 tools and a vac, but I keep coming back to loving the system so much, and with a small shop I like the idea of the systainers portability, stackability and organization.

I'm really just looking for someone to tell me to jump, or not to jump...My shop is relatively well outfitted so there aren't any other tools I need at this time (aside from a jointer, but that's coming soon enough)

Would the dominos be a good way to build the cabinet boxes out of MDF?  Should I just use screws?  Is the track saw really better than a Triton?  Is the dust extraction worth $600? 

Sorry for random thoughts in this post, but I'm looking for some mentorship and tips from this community as you all seem very knowledgable, and eager to help.

Thanks!

I started with the same style project your mentioning and same tools listed to start.  We wanted some closets and storage for the house, so I figured I’ll do it myself and make a hobby of it.  I started with the purchase of the Festool TS55 track saw, CT Midi, Domino 500, and OF1400 router.  Since then Ive slowly added more tools like the Carvex, RTS 400 and Pro 5 sander, and some others.  It’s an expensive route, but its a system that works and is fun to use.  I’m by no means a carpenter by trade, not even what I do close for a day job, and so far the cabinets I’ve attempted have come out more than satisfactory and better than I ever thought they would come out.

For your question about using the domino for cabinet builds, I love it.  It helps with adding strength to the joint and keeping everything aligned for glue up or pocket hole joinery.  The CT midi helps a lot with dust collection using these tools and has a small footprint. 

Festool TS 55 REQ-F-PLUS
Festool OF 1400 EQ-F-PLUS
Festool CT MIDI HEPA
Festool Domino DF 500 Q-PLUS
Festool PRO 5 LTD (ETS 125 REQ)
Festool FS 1400/2 (x2)
Festool FS 1400/2-LR 32 Guide Rail
Festool LR32 Router Hole Drilling Set

Online DynaGlide

  • Posts: 316
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2019, 01:16 PM »
I'm also in a similar situation as you except I don't have any traditional woodworking shop tools. New house, needs lots of cabinetry based projects, don't have a good space to do woodworking with tools that take up a lot of room or create a lot of dust.

The Domino is cool, but it has a learning curve and that learning curve means for hobby use it's probably going to be slow. Every time I get it out I have to re-learn it and re-make the same mistakes I always do since the last time I used it. But I've used an expensive dowel jig before and I have Kreg K4 and I just like the Domino, even if it takes longer to figure out what I'm doing with it. I'm building a shop cart right now that has 2 end panels and two divider panels and a top that is set in between the two end panels. The Domino work on this was a pain in the  to get everything perfect together. But now that the mortising is done I can dry fit the thing, take some measurements, think about what I want to do with it next, then take it apart for the next operation. I've done that 4 or 5 times already. I don't think I could do the same as easily with other joinery methods. One more note on the Domino. .I see a lot of the pro guys on YouTube with fully loaded shops (including the Domino) not even use it on cabinetry. Pin nails, glue, and pocket hole screws are a heck of a lot faster and just fine for most box building. Check out Mike Farrington sometime. He has every woodworking toy imaginable and for most of his cabinetry builds I don't see the Domino come out as the primary source of joinery. Conversely Peter Millard tends to use his on almost every project.

If you do decide to take the plunge know this: whatever budget you think you're going to spend is way off. You're going to start selling other hobby toys off, your wife's jewelry, your kids, and anything else you have to buy more. It's sickening.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2019, 01:24 PM by DynaGlide »

Offline Euclid

  • Posts: 135
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2019, 01:32 PM »
I’m also relatively new to this - compared to many of the very experienced pro’s around here. Although I rarely bought ‘cheap’ tools, it is only in the past few years that I’ve discovered the fancier, high-end kit like Festool.

For example, I’ve only recently bought a proper dust extractor (a Midi, in my case) rather than a cheap-ish shop vac, and I’m very impressed with the performance, particularly with sanding (a Rotex, my first Festool sander) or anything that spews a jet of dust like a powered saw.

I’m embarking on renovations and of necessity need to do much of it in my living space, so I considered this ample justification for the not inconsiderable expense of a CTL. It works - very well - and I don’t regret the purchase. I’d now struggle to contemplate working without it indoors - and particularly inside my own home!

I haven’t done much with TS55 yet (other real-life pressures getting in the way) but it does seem great for processing sheet goods, which will, I think, be it’s primary use for me.

I’ve never used a Domino, but many others seem to revere it as “a game changer”.
I’ve used dowels quite lot, and these work well - and cheaply - but do require care if only using a cheap and simple jig.

I had always been a bit sneering about pocket-hole joinery, but having seen what others have done (for example, David Stanton in Australia) I realised that when used appropriately, so the screws are hidden, and possibly in conjunction with gluing, it can be very effective. I have recently purchased the UJK pocket-hole system to experiment with and can see me making some fairly simple, functional cabinetry with this. It’s a very nicely made and finished bit of kit - but at its fairly modest price I’d say it does not, and need not, be alternative to a Domino (or any other system), but an addition. Others opinions may, of course, vary!
« Last Edit: February 11, 2019, 01:43 PM by Euclid »

Offline Jiggy Joiner

  • Posts: 38
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2019, 03:32 PM »
Hi, in the last couple of years, certain events have put a lot of thing into perspective for me.
As such, my advice is, if you want it, and can afford it, then go for it. There are other quality brands of tools, that will also make for some beautiful work and craftsmanship. It sounds like you fancy the Festool though, so treat yourself.  ;)

Offline InspektorGadget

  • Posts: 5
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2019, 03:59 PM »
Thanks for all the replies, this has been very helpful!  I think one thing I need to maybe consider a bit more is the Domino.  Some good points have been made as to other solutions that may fit the bill just as well that don't cost $1000+.  I think I'll start with the track saw and CT Vac and see how it goes for breaking down the sheet goods etc. 

I'll maybe wait on the domino for the time being.  Jiggly Joiner, thanks for your bit of advice as well.  It's a hobby that I really love, and so far my family has been thrilled with the results, so it makes me feel a little less guilty when splurging on tools!

Thanks again everyone, and I look forward to reading more replies.

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 715
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2019, 04:54 PM »
Don’t rule out the Kreg. Cheap and effective. Domino is a lot of scratch for a second tool. It's versatile and can take you a long ways in cabinet making.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2019, 08:43 PM by JimH2 »

Offline pettyconstruction

  • Posts: 465
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2019, 05:08 PM »
I think the saw and vac are a good start, maybe pick up the domino on a “recon” sale.
I’m not a pro cabinet dude but I am a general contractor, and I found the domino fairly easy to learn.
Get a cheap chunk of plywood and practice.
You will need a extractor if you get the domino. I have a ct-26 and agree that it is a bit big to travel with but for a shop , it will be great.
Good luck,Charlie


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Offline Jiggy Joiner

  • Posts: 38
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2019, 06:27 PM »
Yes, regarding extractors, it does depend on your volume of work, or plain speaking, how often you want to empty it.
I have a CTM 26 E AC for the workshop, and a midi for mobile/site work. The midi gets used for vacuuming floors too, so a good size to manoeuvre. The mini is bit on the small side for my use but, would be very portable and ideal for the smaller jobs.

We also have a small Makita cordless bluetooth extractor, which is more or less dedicated to our Makita cordless plunge saw. It’s a great little extractor but, way to small for general use, as it’s low volume, and being cordless is limited in run time.

I think a Midi would suit your needs fine.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2019, 06:29 PM by Jiggy Joiner »

Offline jasen

  • Posts: 36
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2019, 06:47 PM »
A weekend renovator myself (and hopefully soon some cabinets for the house). Don't forget the add-ons that make the jobs so much easier.

Adding to the TS55 & Rail would be the TSO GRS16-PE - a must have for cutting boards. Add their upcoming parallel guide TPG series. Some kind of tabletop with 20mm holes - Parfit Guide System and a variety of dogs will make your job so much easier.

Those 3 extras will make your cabinet work so much easier IMO . I don't have a Domino but a Kreg. After watching Dave Stantons video on cabinets & drwaers (as posted above) I'm OK for that now. The cost in Australia is out of this world for a weekend handyman.
HTH
Cheers
 

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 790
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2019, 09:56 PM »
 Always get the holed track when you get your saw and future pieces of track, this way you can leverage your 1400 router for the pins. The domino is strait forward and the learning curve is not steep. I would suggest getting used to your new tools on inexpensive material. Not on the finish material for your project. Use your new tools to make some useful projects that help you in your shop, at the same time taking your new tool learning curve into account. Every tool has some learning curve that should be learned in the safest cheapest way possible. When I started I cut a piece of OSB into thin strips so I could perfect my use of the track saw. Getting to use and handle the hose and track, clamping and plunging trimming and squaring. I made screw boxes out of the cheap ODB. Using only the festools. This was not a big deal, but a day making saw dust with a purpose that is inexpensive pressure tests your technique. I think it is common mistake to think that you can get a new tool or process and be at 100 percent out of the gate.  My 2 cents. O, and the cool aid tastes good and I have drank heavily. No regrets, actually I wish I had started sooner.

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3556
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2019, 10:53 PM »

Should I just use screws? 

Yes, Dominos are a waste of time. Use them if you want to fiddle around. Biscuits are as effective and cheaper.


Is the track saw really better than a Triton? 

Don't know anything about the Triton, but I think the Festool TS55 is a great saw and has stood up really well.

Is the dust extraction worth $600? 
You don't need a 600 vacuum to cut MDF, but you need some kind of dust extraction. MDF dust makes a big mess. The quality of the Festool vacuums is very good, if that helps you to actually use a vacuum when cutting mdf etc. and is important to you get it.
Tim

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 282
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2019, 12:08 AM »
For closet cabinets - the Kreg jig (k4) would be more than adequate. I have a DF500 and think it's great, but not really critical for cabinet making.  The day I hooked my kreg jig up to my vacuum, I started liking pocket holes a lot more.

Greg Paolini uses a stapler and some screws. That also can get the job done.  Although I don't know how he gets his corners lined up - I couldn't do it when I tried.  You can also just countersink coarse thread screws through the sides ala Danny Proulx and that works too.

Don't forget to get some clamps and a non-marring mallet for adjusting alignment/fit.

Yes to a dust extractor.  No to necessarily needing it to be the festool one.  I have the Fein Turbo II and it works great for my needs. I'd say any extractor that has auto-start and adjustable suction, running a hepa filter, is going to make you very happy with your festools.

The tracksaw is great, as is the TSO Square.  Combine that with a parallel guide and you can get excellent consistency - especially if you plan your cuts thoughtfully.  If you have the space, getting a 1400mm and 2800mm rail is probably going to be better than combining two rails for long rips.  I don't have the space, and it makes things just a little less effortless. 

If you don't buy the domino, you should buy a dust deputy (again, does not need to be the $375  version).  The tracksaw does a great job w/ dust extraction, but you'll be amazed how much dust it collects when you break down 10 sheets of particleboard.

The LR32 system is sweet, but it does require you to get a Festool router.  If you go down that road, I'd suggest the OF1010, as you can also do flush edges with it.  There are other good systems that will also work (Lee Valley, etc..).





Offline infer

  • Posts: 28
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2019, 02:44 AM »
Honestly I don’t see much difference from switching all my tools to the green side. Plug it is nice and so is the boom arm but I keep wondering how much nice wood I could have bought instead.
Just buy what you need not what you think you will need.

Online Sanderxpander

  • Posts: 242
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2019, 06:51 AM »
Clamps

Offline Ewoodster

  • Posts: 7
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2019, 07:18 AM »
I am a 34 year old hobbyist woodworker.  I do stuff for friends/family and around the house for my wife and myself.  All for fun and not for profit......I have a large walk in closet in my house, and after gaining the trust of my wife from other projects I've been tasked with doing built in cabinets/organization for said closet.

Being relatively young, I was considering buying some quality "buy it for life" type of tools like a Festool TS55, CT MIDI Extractor and Domino 500.  My thought is the track saw to break down the 16-20 sheets of MDF or Plywood.  A domino to do loose tenon joinery on the cabinet boxes, and a dust extractor to...Well, extract the dust. 

There are many other projects in the pipeline, but this closet is what spurned me to look into these tools.  It's a lot of money to spend on 2 tools and a vac, but I keep coming back to loving the system so much, and with a small shop I like the idea of the systainers portability, stackability and organization.

I'm really just looking for someone to tell me to jump, or not to jump...My shop is relatively well outfitted so there aren't any other tools I need at this time (aside from a jointer, but that's coming soon enough)

Would the dominos be a good way to build the cabinet boxes out of MDF?  Should I just use screws?  Is the track saw really better than a Triton?  Is the dust extraction worth $600? 

Sorry for random thoughts in this post, but I'm looking for some mentorship and tips from this community as you all seem very knowledgable, and eager to help.

Thanks!
Regarding the track saw you could safe some money and get the Bosch instead. The Bosch tracksaw is very similar to the Mafell MT 55, which is even more expensive than the Fesstool TS55. The only benefit of the TS55 is that it can make cuts closer to the wall due to the flat dustport.

If you plan on getting a Domino: Do it. There is no comparable tool.

Offline InspektorGadget

  • Posts: 5
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2019, 09:07 AM »
I went ahead and ordered the TS55 track saw and the CT MIDI Dust extractor.  Very excited to get started!

When it comes to rails am I better off buying two 55" rails with the holes like you guys mentioned, or should I get the 118" rail and one 55" rail.

Cost wise, I like the idea of two 55" and connecting them, but just wanted to hear some other opinions.

Thanks again for all the help, I'm going to wait on the domino and probably buy one of the festool sanders instead at this time as I think that could have a better place in my shop at this time.

Offline SoonerFan

  • Posts: 429
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2019, 09:36 AM »
I went ahead and ordered the TS55 track saw and the CT MIDI Dust extractor.  Very excited to get started!

When it comes to rails am I better off buying two 55" rails with the holes like you guys mentioned, or should I get the 118" rail and one 55" rail.

Cost wise, I like the idea of two 55" and connecting them, but just wanted to hear some other opinions.

Thanks again for all the help, I'm going to wait on the domino and probably buy one of the festool sanders instead at this time as I think that could have a better place in my shop at this time.

I started with two 55 inch rails and connectors.  I used these for a few years without any issues.  I ultimately got the 118 inch rail.  It’s nice to have a longer rail but not needed.

Online DynaGlide

  • Posts: 316
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2019, 09:46 AM »
The two 55 holey rails are a good buy. I think the 118 is only good if you have a very large shop to swing it around and store it.

Offline InspektorGadget

  • Posts: 5
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2019, 09:51 AM »
Two 55" it is, don't have a large shop so storing them will be much easier like you said.

Just wanted to also say thanks for the lack of smart , wise crack answers that generally fill these forums when a newbie like myself posts for the first time.  Nothing but quality, well though out replies.  That's pretty rare, and I appreciate the assistance/guidance.

Now, off to the pay day loan store to fund more Festool!

Offline nixy

  • Posts: 12
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2019, 09:52 AM »
Just adding to the thread...I'm only a weekend DIYer as well. I started to buy Festool for three main reasons.

1. Dust collection when working inside the house. Some other brands just don't seem to get the dust out of the dust port very well.
2. The re-sell value of Festool is generally very good on the popular tools, even after years of owning them. e.g CT Vacuums, TS55, Domino, Rotex sanders, Systainer cases. (I found this out when I tried to look for used second-hand on Ebay). For around 20% more I could buy new instead of second-hand.
3. The cost of systainer is included in the tool price. They are brilliant cases for workshop or home use. But make sure you decide which stacking cases you will adopt to keep things tidy in a small workshop space.

Yes they are expensive but I only buy slowly when there is a deal going on e.g Festool vouchers, 10% day on Ebay or some retailer, or someone has a special offer for a Festool item. Then I snap it up even though I may not use it straight away. This builds up my collection.

Having said that....dont always buy Festool because its a Festool. For that kind of money its always worth checking an alternative high end brand and trying them out. For example I bought a Mirka Deros orbital sander because it felt so great in the hand compared to Festool. Similar price to Festool though and great dust collection. 

If your working outside where dust collection is less important, then I would say Festool isn't always necessary for some tools. Dewalt, Bosch, Makita etc will do the very same job for less money. And dropping your expensive Festool outside on the floor will make you annoyed at yourself.

Hope this helps!

Offline WoodworkTech

  • Posts: 145
    • My Personal Blog
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #23 on: February 12, 2019, 10:07 AM »
Festool USA just released a 9 part video series on YouTube on Building a cabinet.  The instructor uses many different Festool tools.  Might help you understand the Festool System or what tools you may want or not want to tackle your project.
Festool TS 55 REQ-F-PLUS
Festool OF 1400 EQ-F-PLUS
Festool CT MIDI HEPA
Festool Domino DF 500 Q-PLUS
Festool PRO 5 LTD (ETS 125 REQ)
Festool FS 1400/2 (x2)
Festool FS 1400/2-LR 32 Guide Rail
Festool LR32 Router Hole Drilling Set

Offline InspektorGadget

  • Posts: 5
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #24 on: February 12, 2019, 10:25 AM »
Sweet, thanks for pointing out this video series.  I'll definitely check it out!

Offline ctvader

  • Posts: 45
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #25 on: February 12, 2019, 10:25 AM »
Here is the link to part 1


Online Sanderxpander

  • Posts: 242
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #26 on: February 12, 2019, 12:49 PM »
It's worth noting that connecting rails and making sure they're absolutely straight can be more finicky than you might assume. The Festool rail connectors are not great. I've managed for a while but it's worth looking at a tutorial or two.

After much recommendation on here I ordered a set of Makita rail connectors which supposedly work well but I haven't been able to check them out yet. I also found out last week that TSO Products makes a set of self aligning rail connectors for a pretty reasonable price. I don't have any but I have their guide rail square and if they are made to the same standard I would definitely recommend them. Maybe someone who has them can comment. You should get their guide rail square regardless.

Online Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3723
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #27 on: February 12, 2019, 12:53 PM »
Even with the Makita connectors you have to re-check straightness after moving the combined rails.

Offline Midnight Man

  • Posts: 52
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #28 on: February 15, 2019, 08:13 AM »
I had the same doubts as you InspektorGadget when I first started.  I'm old and cranky enough to not want to put up with cheap crap made to a price point, that, and the follow on desire to "buy it once, buy it right" persuaded me to get into the Festool system and lineup.

My first purchase was the TS55, and CT36 which I got as a package.  The quality of these tools really impressed me, but I was sure that I would stop there...

Then came the Kapex 120.  Again a very impressive piece of kit.  No worries, I thought, I had all I needed now for sure!

Then came a DTS 400.  And the Domino 500.  And an ETS EC 150/3.  And the LR32 system.

And now I'm thinking (no, I'm kidding myself, I will get it) on the Conturo.

It's a slippery slope, but you will get many years of enjoyment from your tools :)

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1397
Re: Help! Custom Closet and Taking the Plunge
« Reply #29 on: February 15, 2019, 09:39 AM »
You made a great first purchase.  Those two tools are staples and often a gateway into the Festool ecosystem for many.  Just a warning, I started with the same and within a month a domino was at my door!  I wasn’t expecting that, but once I saw how fast, clean and dust free the results with the tracksaw were, I wanted to look at their other offerings.

Regarding the domino vs kreg, I never warmed up to the kreg because I would get slight misalignments in the joints.  I instantly warmed up to the domino and if using clamps is too cumbersome or you need the flexibility to disassemble for future modifications, the domino and kreg can compliment one another.  It’s an expensive way to do it, but my time in the shop is valuable to me, so whatever I’m comfortable with and gives me the results I want....

Congrats and have fun!
-Raj