Author Topic: Rationale for Festool Guide Rail pricing  (Read 3740 times)

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Offline serge0n

  • Posts: 62
Re: Rationale for Festool Guide Rail pricing
« Reply #30 on: August 07, 2018, 12:23 PM »
Another thing that no one mentioned yet is that Makita rails are not anodized and may leave marks on certain woods.

I have both Festool and Makita rails and never experienced any marring, but others have. Also, I haven't had any issues connecting Festool and Makita rails together.

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Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1468
Re: Rationale for Festool Guide Rail pricing
« Reply #31 on: August 07, 2018, 12:32 PM »
Another thing that no one mentioned yet is that Makita rails are not anodized and may leave marks on certain woods.
Are you sure? Perhaps the quality of anodizing is poor?

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 737
Re: Rationale for Festool Guide Rail pricing
« Reply #32 on: August 07, 2018, 11:10 PM »
this is easy to test. I guess I have to break out my surface condition crud. Aluminum oxide is vastly harder than regular aluminum. I will say my makita rails are holding up beautifully.  I still have a hard time with the comment that the mafell and bosch are superior in every way. The connection method is convenient but that is one criteria and not necessarily a driving one. I do not know how many thousand linear feet of festool track there is in the world, but all of the stuff I have is pretty much dead on.  far as accuracy goes I have found the composite track not to be as accurate, I stack this up to the means of manufacture and the composite nature of its construction. So it can not be superior in every way. Granted there may be more exhaustive means of testing, than are available to me. I am limited to autocollimattion and referencing surface plate interrogation. Now please understand I understand the value of statistical sample size and that my sampling is limited. As a matter of definition I would argue that monolithic construction is inherently more stable and possibly more accurate than a composite construction, especially when plastics are involved. As for the price, I would suggest that reflects the ecosystem of the festool price structure. To argue that they are priced excessively assume to understand all of the costs involved. I would rather them stay in business and make lots of money. This goes for their distributors. I wonder how many in this forum treat their own value and product so miserly? The rail with be the cheapest thing that you buy that you use. If you choose to use their track. Wait, if festool track is expensive the Mafell track is eye watering. From what I have seen on their pricing.

Offline Laminator

  • Posts: 319
Re: Rationale for Festool Guide Rail pricing
« Reply #33 on: August 07, 2018, 11:24 PM »
What is "composit" nature referring to the bosch rails?

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 737
Re: Rationale for Festool Guide Rail pricing
« Reply #34 on: August 08, 2018, 01:47 AM »
what I am referring to is the plastic component at the ends of the rail. In my example It caused the ends of the rail to deflect upward. This could be corrected. Again this is why I mention the nature of my sample size. Also I have said I like all of these rail products. What I as suggesting the concept of best is hard to deal with without some kind of data. I would also suggest that these products are of sufficient quality that the operator may be the largest factor in substandard cut quality.  Early on in festool time I had shipping damaged rails, of the old design. After this is started checking my rails to check for shipping damage. This was back when festool was basically mail order and there was no real dealer network. I have easily a 10 rails. The only ones that were out of "spec", were so due to shipping issues. We can argue about that they should be shipped in a more robust fashion. I do think that people are far to cavalier with their handling of these rails and the condition that of the cut surface has on the the cut quality.  I do wonder how much of the difficulties with the rails are well meaning oversights of best practices techniques and QAQC in the rail manufacture. I still think the cost is not out of line. I will also admit that my rails are in a hybrid condition, meaning I use makita cut strips and not the festool ones.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2018, 02:16 AM by tallgrass »

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 409
Re: Rationale for Festool Guide Rail pricing
« Reply #35 on: August 08, 2018, 10:26 AM »
what I am referring to is the plastic component at the ends of the rail. In my example It caused the ends of the rail to deflect upward. This could be corrected. Again this is why I mention the nature of my sample size. Also I have said I like all of these rail products. What I as suggesting the concept of best is hard to deal with without some kind of data. I would also suggest that these products are of sufficient quality that the operator may be the largest factor in substandard cut quality.  Early on in festool time I had shipping damaged rails, of the old design. After this is started checking my rails to check for shipping damage. This was back when festool was basically mail order and there was no real dealer network. I have easily a 10 rails. The only ones that were out of "spec", were so due to shipping issues. We can argue about that they should be shipped in a more robust fashion. I do think that people are far to cavalier with their handling of these rails and the condition that of the cut surface has on the the cut quality.  I do wonder how much of the difficulties with the rails are well meaning oversights of best practices techniques and QAQC in the rail manufacture. I still think the cost is not out of line. I will also admit that my rails are in a hybrid condition, meaning I use makita cut strips and not the festool ones.

The price issues is probably a bigger issue in Canada where we get tariff-ed to death and beyond.  If we were paying the same price as the US it would be an easier pill to swallow.
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 737
Re: Rationale for Festool Guide Rail pricing
« Reply #36 on: August 08, 2018, 01:43 PM »
it is amazing how often our government overlords screw things up for the little people.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1468
Re: Rationale for Festool Guide Rail pricing
« Reply #37 on: August 08, 2018, 02:34 PM »
What is "composit" nature referring to the bosch rails?
what I am referring to is the plastic component at the ends of the rail. In my example It caused the ends of the rail to deflect upward.
Those are just end plugs, similar to Festool hose deflector. You remove them if you connect Bosch/Mafell rails. How do they cause the rail to deflect upward?
« Last Edit: August 08, 2018, 02:37 PM by Svar »

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 737
Re: Rationale for Festool Guide Rail pricing
« Reply #38 on: August 08, 2018, 03:21 PM »
I keep them in my bosch rail. I find excessive snagging with them out.  It is an interesting question. I tested the rail with the festool deflector and it did not change the rail. The fit of mine is fairly loose in all of my rails. Again samples of one are problematic [blink].  I tested the bosch rail with and without the plugs. With out the plugs the deflection was not as severe. This may be to the artifact of their long term being in place. The only thing that comes to mind is that they induce excessive pressure causing some deflection. This is extremely minimal. This may be a variable that is specific to the particular plastic "plugs " you have with the specific rail you have. I think I have said in this post that all of these rails seem to live withing what would be expected from quality extrusions. Hence my difficulty with the idea of better being empirical, as the well as the idea of quality being relative.