Author Topic: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.  (Read 4563 times)

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Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1103
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #30 on: April 21, 2019, 12:42 PM »
Having used and/or owned both the TS55, TS75, DF500 and DF700, I agree the weight difference between the TS55 and TS75 is marginal because you are sliding the saw most of the time on the track. Unless the price difference between the saws is a key factor, the TS75 is the preferred choice.

I disagree, however, with the suggestion that the DF700 is as easy to use and control as the DF500. The weight difference between a DF700 and a DF500 is larger than that between the TS's, for one thing. And in use, we are holding and not sliding the machine.

For a small batch of mortises, the heavier weight in a DF700 may not matter (esp. if you have stronger arms), but easily we can be cutting hundreds of mortises, and the cumulative effect is a different story. Of course, if the longer and larger dominoes are what you need, you have no options but to get the DF700.

If double or twin dominoes can meet the joinery needs, even if the price difference is not a factor, I would not want to "abuse" my arms (holding, positioning, and pushing) day in and day out for no added benefits. I find the larger DF700 more straining to use than the DF500, a point also shared by at least two Festool-trained employees at my local store (both are taller and have stronger arms than I). I do not find the higher position of the handle (DF700) a benefit in use vs the handle on the DF500 that is more or less in line with the centre of the cutter.

It is also easier to handle narrower and smaller pieces with the DF500 than the DF700 on some occasions -- trying positioning the DF500 vs DF700 using the intersecting lines technique, and you will understand my point.

Having built tables, cabinets, ladders (and working on chairs now) with no plans for making any exterior entrance doors, I can't foresee benefiting anything from having a DF700 in my work. If a circular saw does the job, why get a wormgear saw is my usual reasoning. (For the record, I can afford owning BOTH the DF500 and DF700 if I want to, as some other members here do.)
« Last Edit: April 21, 2019, 03:48 PM by ChuckM »

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Offline Chinski

  • Posts: 51
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #31 on: April 21, 2019, 04:00 PM »
Similarly the 700 domino is a no brainer. Its bigger than the 500 but a much better machine. So well balanced and with the seneca adapter wonder why anyone would buy the 500.

Sooooo true.  I got the Seneca 10mm plate and a cheaper 3rd party bit extender and haven’t looked back. Spent all day Friday making an 18mm storage unit with 6mm dominos and its a pleasure to use. Looks a beast fully loaded with Seneca plate, df stop and the side guide extenders...

Offline Bob Wolfe

  • Posts: 92
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #32 on: April 21, 2019, 08:45 PM »
I have had the 55 for maybe 10 years and have ripped hundreds of feet of nearly everything, all with one rip blade sharpened many times.

Some people just have no clue what blade to use...……
BW

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1103
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #33 on: April 21, 2019, 08:50 PM »
Snip.

Some people just have no clue what blade to use...……
BW

The same can be said of some table saw users. I have come across table saw owners who complain about burn marks and bogging down, and blame everything on the power of their saws. They use a combo sawblade for everything.

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5964
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #34 on: April 21, 2019, 09:50 PM »
Posted this before......used the wrong blade on purpose.



Tom

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6030
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #35 on: April 21, 2019, 10:38 PM »
I disagree, however, with the suggestion that the DF700 is as easy to use and control as the DF500. The weight difference between a DF700 and a DF500 is larger than that between the TS's, for one thing.

I’m with Chuck on this one.

I own the TS 55, TSC 55 and the TS 75. The TSC is used 80% of the time, the TS 55 10% of the time because it may be more convenient and the TS 75 10% of the time.

I also use the DF 500 90% of the time and the DF 700 10% of the time.

I grab the CXS drill 80% of the time and a Milwaukee M18 drill 20% of the time.

The common denominator in all of these examples is physical size and weight. The smaller & lighter the tool is, the more pleasant the user experience is.

I also own a 19# Milwaukee 1854 drill with a 3/4” chuck. I could use it for drilling 3/16” diameter holes in wood.......but why would I? 
I’d rather use it for augering 7” diameter holes in soil for fence posts.



« Last Edit: April 22, 2019, 09:35 AM by Cheese »

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1103
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #36 on: April 22, 2019, 05:45 PM »
In my case (if I also owned a DF700), it were 99% DF500, 1% DF700.

By the way, I am pretty sure balancing and aligning for the slim three-way mitres (completed about five years ago) would be easier with the DF500 than with the DF700.
« Last Edit: April 22, 2019, 05:50 PM by ChuckM »

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1890
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #37 on: April 24, 2019, 05:51 PM »
You know, the tools people feel comfortable depend on how they use them, what they use them for, and what other tools and workbenches they use them with. For example, I own a TS55, Domino DF500, Domino 700XL. I wouldn't use the Domino 700 for much of anything except very large projects. It's just too large and unwieldy for most furniture and drawers. The 700 certainly has some design superiority but, for standard size furniture projects, the 500 is much easier too be precise with. I also had, at one point, had the TS75. Since my use was mostly on the MFT and not for cutting extra thick wood, I found the 75 was cumbersome to use and abandoned it for the TS55 which, for me, works extremely well.

We should never forget that there is not one single design of tool that works for everyone.
Randy

Offline mrB

  • Posts: 542
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #38 on: April 24, 2019, 06:21 PM »
I definitely did not realise my TS55 sucked [tongue]  Do you need to use it for more than 10 years before you realise it sucks?

Just because it's a soft wood doesn't mean it will be easy to rip cut. A nice old dry hardwood might rip fine with a 48 tooth blade if you go slowly, but a fresh softwood timber might quickly jam the blade with all it's fresh stringy fibres. For ripping your'e just better off with a rip blade.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2019, 09:30 PM by mrB »
there's nothing like the right tool for the job

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 1103
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #39 on: April 24, 2019, 06:46 PM »
Snip.

We should never forget that there is not one single design of tool that works for everyone.

If there were, all dominoes/tenons would only come in ONE size (and not in so many sizes to choose from, not counting the shop-made ones). [tongue] :P
« Last Edit: April 24, 2019, 06:57 PM by ChuckM »

Offline White

  • Posts: 10
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #40 on: May 28, 2019, 11:11 PM »
If you don't want to invest in a good rip blade then think about buying a decent bandsaw.

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2718
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #41 on: May 29, 2019, 12:36 AM »

Just because it's a soft wood doesn't mean it will be easy to rip cut. A nice old dry hardwood might rip fine with a 48 tooth blade if you go slowly, but a fresh softwood timber might quickly jam the blade with all it's fresh stringy fibres. For ripping your'e just better off with a rip blade.

And some here may not realise that some species of 'hard' wood are actually softer than some 'soft' woods. The definition of soft or hardwood is related to how a species of timber reproduces. Hence Balsa wood, to the surprise of many, is a hardwood.

https://science.howstuffworks.com/life/genetic/question598.htm

As to the merits of the TS55 mine cuts Australian Eucalyptus such as Mountain Ash which is very dense. The choice of a sharp blade is the main consideration - rip blade for ripping, standard for cross cutting. And steady as she goes.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2019, 12:41 AM by Untidy Shop »
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Offline Chinski

  • Posts: 51
Re: So anyway, the TS 55 sucks - who knew?! I'm getting a 75.
« Reply #42 on: June 03, 2019, 02:41 PM »
Some people just have no clue what blade to use...……

Well, yes Bob, I admit that if I had had a ripping blade then I would have had a very different experience.  But in the end, I am glad that this made me swap because, as Blues says:

Point is this: you want to have the least number of tools that can help you do most number of jobs.

I don't have a surplus of cash or space - so the above approach makes sense for me.   

I have done a couple of jobs recently that have necessitated the full depth of cut the TS75 and the stock blade seems good enough for both smooth cross cuts and longer rips. 

I fully agree that the TS75 is heavier to use than its smaller brother - and this goes for the Domino 700 XL with Seneca adapters.  And if I had the cash for both versions of both (and/or the TSC) then I'd be with you who don't agree. 

Maybe I should start a go fund me page ;-D

Thanks