Author Topic: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem  (Read 8485 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mtbev

  • Posts: 4
TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« on: May 05, 2018, 07:43 AM »
I work side by side with a subcontractor of mine who occasionally uses his TS 55 saw. We both own the same saw and know how to properly use it. He just had his armature replaced for the second time for a cost of $150 plus shipping. This time it was not under warranty.

This is what happened:  The saw began "burning up" while cutting 1.5" deep through yellow pine with a fresh blade. We were cutting at a slow pace for a total of 12 LF. We had a total of 4 cuts to make. We pulled out the makita circular saw to finish the project and it breezed the cuts.

This saw was not abused and had 2 repairs of the same nature. Festool charges a premium for their tools. I own several Festool tools. I strongly question the reliability of the festool track saw and may look to other manufactures for future tools. Has anyone else had this kind of trouble?

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3583
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2018, 07:55 AM »
That's certainly frustrating.  By burning up do you mean the cut quality or the saw itself?

Did you check the blade to see if it was clean, and what tooth count was the blade?  Especially on rip cuts in thick material the blade type and its relative state of cleanliness can make a big difference in the cut quality.

I work side by side with a subcontractor of mine who occasionally uses his TS 55 saw. We both own the same saw and know how to properly use it. He just had his armature replaced for the second time for a cost of $150 plus shipping. This time it was not under warranty.

This is what happened:  The saw began "burning up" while cutting 1.5" deep through yellow pine with a fresh blade. We were cutting at a slow pace for a total of 12 LF. We had a total of 4 cuts to make. We pulled out the makita circular saw to finish the project and it breezed the cuts.

This saw was not abused and had 2 repairs of the same nature. Festool charges a premium for their tools. I own several Festool tools. I strongly question the reliability of the festool track saw and may look to other manufactures for future tools. Has anyone else had this kind of trouble?
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7344
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2018, 08:05 AM »
We haven't seen a lot of issues on the FOG with the TS55 armature (on the Kapex is different story).  Were you using a rip blade or the fine tooth blade that comes with the saw?
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline mtbev

  • Posts: 4
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2018, 10:08 AM »
Yes it was the motor that burnt up .It was a 48 tooth blade. I figured in such a soft wood it would be fine, especially since it died in the middle of a 12 ft rip on such a soft wood.

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 8458
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2018, 10:18 AM »
Yes it was the motor that burnt up .It was a 48 tooth blade. I figured in such a soft wood it would be fine, especially since it died in the middle of a 12 ft rip on such a soft wood.

Hi,

   Welcome to the forum!  [smile]

The 48 tooth Fine blade has tooth geometry for cross cuts and sheet goods.

Use a rip blade. I have found cuts in pine , especially construction lumber, can be more binding on the blade than other woods that are harder.



Seth

Offline sheperd80

  • Posts: 118
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2018, 10:36 AM »
Sorry to hear about your trouble. My ts55 is just over a year old and no problems yet, but the motor certainly feels weak. It bogs down pretty easily. I dont plan to use it on hardwood much as it just doesnt feel like its built for that. I love the features and accuracy of it, but its kind of a gutless wonder. My little milwaukee cordless is atleast twice as powerful. I wish festool would drop the electronic speed control nonsense. It seems like such a pointless feature considering the saw bogs down on EVERYTHING. Ditch the over-engineered electronics and give me a motor with some power.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk


Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4676
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2018, 11:05 AM »
Definitely swap out the 48 tooth blade for the 12 tooth rip blade. I'd even try using the 12 tooth rip blade (500463) for the HKC. The kerf on the HKC blade is .4mm narrower which means theoretically, it should use 20% less power.

It may be the moisture content in the yellow pine is the culprit.

I am surprised however, that the temp control circuit and the current limiting circuit didn't kick in  [sad]  to prevent the damage, that's what they're for.  [mad]  [mad]

Offline glass1

  • Posts: 412
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2018, 12:57 PM »
Use a rip blade or just get the Makita. Bigger huevos. Corded or cordless.

Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7344
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2018, 01:56 PM »
A rip blade is optimal.  That said, I'd recommend the 28 tooth blade as a general purpose blade.  I use the Freud 28 tooth blade.  You can get these for for around 30 bucks on Amazon. Freud 28 tooth blade, Amazon   
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline Corwin

  • Posts: 2573
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2018, 02:53 PM »
A rip blade is optimal.  That said, I'd recommend the 28 tooth blade as a general purpose blade.  I use the Freud 28 tooth blade.  You can get these for for around 30 bucks on Amazon. Freud 28 tooth blade, Amazon

Keep in mind that changing blades with different sized kerfs will affect the guide rail's splinter strip. The Festool blades have a 2.2mm kerf. This Freud blade has a 2.5mm kerf. Not a big difference, but it will cut into your splinter strip a little more and therefore when you reinstall a blade with the narrower kerf, your splinter strip will no longer work as well with that blade.
Looks like your rabbit joint is a hare off! ;)

Offline pettyconstruction

  • Posts: 444
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2018, 03:26 PM »
A rip blade is optimal.  That said, I'd recommend the 28 tooth blade as a general purpose blade.  I use the Freud 28 tooth blade.  You can get these for for around 30 bucks on Amazon. Freud 28 tooth blade, Amazon

Keep in mind that changing blades with different sized kerfs will affect the guide rail's splinter strip. The Festool blades have a 2.2mm kerf. This Freud blade has a 2.5mm kerf. Not a big difference, but it will cut into your splinter strip a little more and therefore when you reinstall a blade with the narrower kerf, your splinter strip will no longer work as well with that blade.
Speaking of that, I just discovered my HKC blade has a thinner kerf.
Now I have a TS-75 a Tcs-45and a Hkc-55 all with different kerfs.[emoji15]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Offline T. Ernsberger

  • Posts: 859
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #11 on: May 05, 2018, 05:06 PM »
I like to think that the TS55 is made for material less than 1 inch.  Anything over a inch a ts75 should be used. Or just do what I did and buy a Mafell Mt55.  My issues with the ts55 is that it’s too underpowered.

Offline jcjc

  • Posts: 2
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #12 on: May 05, 2018, 05:49 PM »
if either of you replaces your ts55, get the mafell. i bought a ts55req and a mafell mt55, used them both and sent the ts55 back.

Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7344
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #13 on: May 05, 2018, 07:44 PM »
if either of you replaces your ts55, get the mafell. i bought a ts55req and a mafell mt55, used them both and sent the ts55 back.

We will be getting the Bosch version of the MT55 here in the states in the fall.  It doesn't have all the features of the Mafell but it comes in at the same price of the TS55.  I'll into replacing my 12 year old TS55 then.
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7344
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2018, 07:48 PM »
A rip blade is optimal.  That said, I'd recommend the 28 tooth blade as a general purpose blade.  I use the Freud 28 tooth blade.  You can get these for for around 30 bucks on Amazon. Freud 28 tooth blade, Amazon

Keep in mind that changing blades with different sized kerfs will affect the guide rail's splinter strip. The Festool blades have a 2.2mm kerf. This Freud blade has a 2.5mm kerf. Not a big difference, but it will cut into your splinter strip a little more and therefore when you reinstall a blade with the narrower kerf, your splinter strip will no longer work as well with that blade.

Corwin, I've found that's only true in theory.  In practice the splinter guard wares down enough that isn't really a problem.  If you're the type that diligently adjusts/replaces the splinter guard then maybe.   
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline Lettusbee

  • Posts: 51
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2018, 09:31 PM »
Anybody else notice that the HKC ships with what is basically a rip blade? 
Hmm.  They pulled the wool over my eyes with that one. 
Never again. 
I am done with Festool saws. 
Sanders? fine.  I love their sanders. 
Saws?   No more.
I have my HKC on local Craigslist, wishing I had returned it before the 30 day window expired. 
Not even gonna try the Kapex.
My 10 Year old TS55 has lived through a lot of abuse.  I'll give it credit for that.  It has always been gutless though.  But I'm genuinely afraid to try the latest TS55 saw.
I'm going with Mafell for my next saw purchase.
I'm not here to inflame anyone's emotions. 
I genuinely would like for Festool to understand where I am coming from and why I am avoiding all of their saw products for the foreseeable future. 

Offline glass1

  • Posts: 412
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2018, 11:34 PM »
If got a trust fund buy the mafell. Otherwise buy the cordless Makita. I think it’s got more power than the ts75.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1369
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2018, 01:43 AM »
Anybody else notice that the HKC ships with what is basically a rip blade? 
Hmm.  They pulled the wool over my eyes with that one.
What do you mean they pulled the wool over your eyes? It says right there on HKC Festool page - comes with W18 saw blade.
Besides, it's a construction saw. Makes perfect sense to have a more aggressive blade on it.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2018, 10:50 AM by Svar »

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 5673
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2018, 03:39 AM »
I find the motor of the TS55 very weak, I am totally not surprised to hear that the motor burned up using the 48 tooth blade with a rip cut. As long as I cut sheet goods up to an inch my TS is fine, but beyond that it stalls wayyyyy more often than I like, and as soon as I have to money I'm going to replace it with a Bosch or Mafell (hopefully Mafell).

Offline mtbev

  • Posts: 4
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #19 on: May 06, 2018, 08:52 AM »
Thanks everyone so far for posting.

This is seems to be the summary from the comments so far:

The blade, bc it wasn't perfectly matched to the type of cut, caused the saw to burn up.

The depth of plunge should never be maximized since this saw is under powered and only designed for sheet goods.

I own a small cabinet shop and none of my tools have these restrictions. Usually the power of the saw corresponds to the depth of cut. Even though I used a crosscut blade for cutting the soft pine, it should have easily handled it. I can put any blade on any of my makita circ saws and they won't burn up after a full days abuse on a framing job.

I didn't add in my first comment that the first saw burned up on 3/4 MDF!

I believe festool should increase power on the saw and market it for "light use only", followed by a $300 reduction in price. I'm very disappointed in this weekend warrior grade saw.

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 11412
  • Another Avatar Coming Soon
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2018, 11:53 AM »
Sorry to read about your friends issues.  Whereas he is getting his repaired and you also have one, here is a link to a great manual that might give extra tips that will help in the future:  https://www.festoolusa.com/service/owners-manuals#Saws  (go for the supplemental manual).

I haven't seen that product that you are showing in the images with all the stamps on it.  What is that?

Peter

Offline waho6o9

  • Posts: 1343
    • Garage Door Handyman.com
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #21 on: May 06, 2018, 01:16 PM »
I think using a dust extractor would help keep things cool.

IDK, I use both the 55 and 75 with dust extraction without issue. The 75 has a rip blade, Festool Panther blade, and the 55 uses
the stock blade for sheet goods  and I'm glad to report no problems.


Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 511
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #22 on: May 06, 2018, 02:24 PM »
Mine is a TS75 and so power has never been a concern for me. I never use any Festool machines without dust collection for both performance and health safety reasons. After all, dust extraction is a selling point Festool tries to convey.

The OP did not mention if he was using the saw with or without dust extraction which could make a difference.

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 11412
  • Another Avatar Coming Soon
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #23 on: May 06, 2018, 02:40 PM »
After looking at the images posted in the first of this thread I would venture a guess that dust extraction in at least this particular operation was not utilized.

Peter

Offline Rip Van Winkle

  • Posts: 301
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #24 on: May 06, 2018, 03:00 PM »
A rip blade is optimal.  That said, I'd recommend the 28 tooth blade as a general purpose blade.  I use the Freud 28 tooth blade.  You can get these for for around 30 bucks on Amazon. Freud 28 tooth blade, Amazon

Keep in mind that changing blades with different sized kerfs will affect the guide rail's splinter strip. The Festool blades have a 2.2mm kerf. This Freud blade has a 2.5mm kerf. Not a big difference, but it will cut into your splinter strip a little more and therefore when you reinstall a blade with the narrower kerf, your splinter strip will no longer work as well with that blade.

The crucial dimensions for the anti splinter strips on the track are not the kerf width of the blade, it’s the kerf width of the blade minus the thickness of the saw plate.

A 2.2mm kerfed blade, with a 1.8mm saw plate(the thickness of the sheet of steel the body of the blade was cut from) has a kerf/plate difference of .4mm. 
A 1.8mm kerfed blade, with a 1.4mm saw plate, would also have a kerf/plate difference of .4mm, so the saw blade should cut at the same area in regards to the anti splinter strip on the guide rails.

The plastic anti splinter strip that attaches to the saw would be affected, and would need to be swapped out for the narrower blade, but that is less of a hassle and cost.

Other things can come into play, such as blade deflection from a thinner blade, and manufacturing tolerences, and if a blade has been Sharpened.
Sharpening a blade, will narrow the teeth slightly, causing them to cut further away from the guide rail antisplinter strip.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1369
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #25 on: May 06, 2018, 03:12 PM »
The OP did not mention if he was using the saw with or without dust extraction which could make a difference.
I don't see how. It does not cool the motor and does not reduce chip load.

Offline Rip Van Winkle

  • Posts: 301
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2018, 03:23 PM »
Definitely swap out the 48 tooth blade for the 12 tooth rip blade. I'd even try using the 12 tooth rip blade (500463) for the HKC. The kerf on the HKC blade is .4mm narrower which means theoretically, it should use 20% less power.

It may be the moisture content in the yellow pine is the culprit.

I am surprised however, that the temp control circuit and the current limiting circuit didn't kick in  [sad]  to prevent the damage, that's what they're for.  [mad]  [mad]

The problem with pine isn’t the “moisture” content, it’s the resin content. Even two hundred year old pine can and will gum up a blade with resin from within the “fully dried” lumber. New pine or other contruction lumber can have so much resin, that your tools may have to be taken apart and cleaned after a days use, simply to make sure there isn’t still resin gumbing up the arbor, or dust collection port, or other areas of the tool.
The resin will also gum up the blade incredibly quickly, especially for long deep cuts were the blade heats up continuously. 

Popular US saws like Milwaukee tilt loks, still have the resin on blade issue. The Milwaukees however use a 7-1/4” blade, which is closer to the diameter of the former ATF65 saws festool used to sell( 7-1/4”=185mm, Festool ATF65 used 190mm/7-1/2” blade). The Milwaukee saws also have a higher 15 amp motor, had a higher blade rotation speed, came with a thin kerf blade, and the blade was a general purpose construction blade with a lower tooth count. I haven’t checked what the specs are on the Makita saw that was used, but it’s probably somewhere between the Festool TS75 and Milwaukee, the motor is definately going have a higher amp draw.

Offline ChuckM

  • Posts: 511
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #27 on: May 06, 2018, 04:53 PM »
The OP did not mention if he was using the saw with or without dust extraction which could make a difference.
I don't see how. It does not cool the motor and does not reduce chip load.

If the saw was already underperforming because of the thickness of the stock and binding of the softwood, the friction between wood and the blade was a factor. Sawdust created by the cutting was not removed quickly by any dust collection and that could also add to the problem. It was not the cooling of the motor but preventing unnecessary loading on the blade and motor that dust collection could help.

Not an advice for saws, but it is known that dust collection is important when using the DF500. As I see it, the sawdust build-up is not only harmful to my lung but also to my machines, even if the extent of harm might be small.

Offline Joe Felchlin

  • Posts: 106
  • Just another day in paradise - Livin’ the dream!
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #28 on: May 06, 2018, 05:28 PM »
When I started looking at Festool Track Saws in 2007 -
I was undecided - TS 55? TS 75?
The TS 55 was lighter and easier to handle.
The TS 75 was heavier - But... It was powerful. It was a “beast”.
Good Ole George at my local Woodcraft store said to me:
“Didn’t your daddy tell you ‘BIGGER is always better’”?  [smile]
I bought the ‘75 - And have never regretted it.

If I used a saw all day long in the trades...
I might think differently about the weight aspect.
But... As a hobbyist furniture maker - The ‘75 meets all my needs.
I’ve bought a “rip” blade - And a “fine” tooth blade...
But... It came with a 36 tooth “combo” blade - And that’s my “everyday” blade.
I seldom change it for the others. Using my 3,000mm Guide Rail -
I’ve ripped: 2-1/2” - 8’ oak, walnut, cherry, birch - 3/4” full sheets of MDF/ Particleboard, Plywood - And more.
I take it easy - And the “beast” cuts thru ‘em “like butter”.
Yea... I may buy a lighter saw at some point - Age being a possible “game changer”.
But for now - “BIGGER is still better.”  ;)



« Last Edit: May 06, 2018, 05:49 PM by Joe Felchlin »
FESTOOL: CT26 and CT33 E HEPA Dust Extractors, MFT 1080, MFT-3, TS 55 REQ-F-Plus USA, TS75 EQ, Guide Rails: 1080's/1400/3000mm, LR 32-SYS/Holey Rail, Parallel Guides and Extensions, OF1400 EQ Plunge Router, OF1010 EQ Plunge Router, HL 850 Planer, RO125 FEQ Rotex Sander, LS 130 EQ Linear Detail Sander, DX93E Detail Sander, C12 Cordless Drill, CXS Cordless Compact Drill Driver, SYS-Centrotec-Set, Domino XL DF 700 EQ Plus Tenon Joiner Set, Domino DF 500 Tenon Joiner | WOODPECKERS: DF 500 Offset Base System | BOSCH: 5412L Compound Miter Saw, 4100-09 10-Inch Table Saw | POWERMATIC: 60HH 8" Jointer, PWBS 14" Bandsaw w/Riser Block | MAKITA: 2012NB Bench Top Planer | JESSEM: Mast-R-Lift XL/Fence/Slide, Rout-R-Plate/Table Stand | RIKON: 50-120 6inX48in Belt-Disc Sander | JET: JBOS-5 Benchtop Oscillating Spindle Sander | PORTER CABLE: 7518 and 690LVRS Routers, 557 Pro Plate Joiner, 16/18/23 Gauge Nailers | LEIGH JIGS: D4R 24 Pro Dovetail Jig, FMT Pro Mortise & Tenon Jig | LIE-NIELSEN: Almost every hand plane | DOWELMAX: 3/8" and 1/4" | KREG: K3 Master System | FEIN: Multimaster FMM 250 Q Kit | TORMEK: Super-Grind 2000 | DUST DEPUTY: Industrial (ALL) Steel Deluxe Cyclone (2)

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2470
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #29 on: May 06, 2018, 05:43 PM »
I think that the corded TS55 is weak - I noticed that in FT training cutting sheet goods. I opted for the 75 and have been happy for solid wood. I acquired a cordless TSC 55 and that has had plenty of power - so I recommend it over the corded for anyone wanting a FT saw and not having issues with power. You need to have an extra set of batteries for lots of cutting, but so far it has been a good set-up for me and processing solid wood. Something else to consider.

 

Offline lunchman

  • Posts: 105
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #30 on: May 06, 2018, 06:21 PM »
A number of weeks ago I needed to make a 45 deg rip cut in a 2x4 to fill in the gap in a 45 deg wall I had framed. The TS55 was out and available, my portable table saw was not. I set up the track saw, got about 18" into the cut, the saw started to bind and tripped my 15 amp garage breaker (one reason I'm building a shop in the basement). I've used the TS55 for plenty of 3/4" plywood cuts, have never used it on 2x4s.

I was somewhat surprised, but realizing I'm using the stock blade and knowing the saw is a bit underpowered, not that surprised. I pulled out the DeWalt table saw, angled the blade and finished the cut. Sure it would be nice if the TS55 had managed the cut and not struggled but in this case it was a matter of using the wrong tool which I immediately realized.

-Dom




Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline mtbev

  • Posts: 4
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #31 on: May 06, 2018, 06:53 PM »
We were cutting a 3 " thick glulam beam. Started the cut with 1.5" deep on one side then cut 1.5" deep on the other after flipping the beam. We were making a heavy duty table by gluing up 2 glulams. The intention was to straight line two pieces of glulam in order to glue them together to make a 30 " wide table top.

I still can't get over the inability to cut more than 12 LF at 1.5" deep and the saw gave up.

Online Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3387
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #32 on: May 06, 2018, 08:31 PM »
We were cutting a 3 " thick glulam beam. Started the cut with 1.5" deep on one side then cut 1.5" deep on the other after flipping the beam. We were making a heavy duty table by gluing up 2 glulams. The intention was to straight line two pieces of glulam in order to glue them together to make a 30 " wide table top.

I still can't get over the inability to cut more than 12 LF at 1.5" deep and the saw gave up.

Since the teeth of the saw were buried in the kerf the lack of dust extraction was a factor. Without positive dust extraction more of that resinous sawdust stayed in the gullets and spread out in the kerf as the teeth carved out more dust increasing friction and contributed to overloading the saw.

I've never been a fan of the ATF and TS speed control tech. They hold back a significant amount of power in order to "give you more" when the going gets tough. I'd rather just have it all, or at least the option to have full power.

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1794
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #33 on: May 07, 2018, 10:45 AM »
A lot of replies, but I think the most important information was the advice to use a 28 tooth or less blade made for ripping. Even on a table saw, I do sometimes use a combination blade for ripping but never on 1 1/2" material, regardless of whether it's hardwood or pine. The combination blades just can't handle ripping material that thick well; sometimes not at all. Given the length of the rip it would be even more important to use a blade meant for ripping.
Randy

Online fiftythree

  • Posts: 3
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #34 on: May 08, 2018, 10:46 AM »
I've never had a problem ripping walnut, maple, white oak and sapele with my TS55 when using a Freud Rip blade. I did try and use the 48 tooth blade and it did bog the saw down, but that blade isn't made for rip cuts so I wasn't surprised. Just switched it out for the rip blade on the next cut and had no problems.

Maybe the Makita has enough extra power to use a blade for a purpose it wasn't designed for. My Bosch CS20 stalled cross cutting some walnut with a 60 tooth blade in it and it's a 15 AMP saw so there could be a lot of factors. Certain boards have stresses in them and others don't.

Offline epicxt

  • Posts: 424
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #35 on: May 08, 2018, 11:04 AM »

I've never had a problem ripping walnut, maple, white oak and sapele with my TS55 when using a Freud Rip blade. I did try and use the 48 tooth blade and it did bog the saw down, but that blade isn't made for rip cuts so I wasn't surprised. Just switched it out for the rip blade on the next cut and had no
+1
I just finished up a kitchen counter replacement where I ended up making the backsplash out of a leftover 6' section of the 1.5" thick maple butcher block material. I forgot to bring my ts75 to the site, so tossed the 12 tooth blade in the ts55 and ripped six 4" strips before re sawing them on the bandsaw and running them through the planer. Had no problems and the saw plowed through the cuts pretty quickly.
n = number of Festools I've got.  (n + 1) = Festools I want

Offline yetihunter

  • Posts: 567
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #36 on: June 20, 2018, 04:12 PM »
I don't want to come across as a condescending armchair carpenter, but I wouldn't try ripping 2x Pine with a 48t blade in my Mafell tracksaw.   So what if the TS55 is 200 watts less than this saw or that saw?  That's not the problem.   

Offline glass1

  • Posts: 412
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #37 on: June 20, 2018, 08:09 PM »
Really ?  Really ?  So when cutting down an antique custom pine door 1 3/4” to 2” thick y’all with your ts55’s have to switch to the panther blade ? You know true doors that need to be cut are cross cuts and rips.  And yes my Makita has got the power to rip cut pine wth a 48 tooth blade, effortlessly.  End of story, some festools just miss the mark, the ts55 is purposefully underpowered to not take market share from the ts75. Some festool products rock, domino remote control vac., routers, the planer is a little awkward but when you need you need it.

Offline TheSergeant

  • Posts: 89
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #38 on: June 20, 2018, 08:42 PM »
This is why I got rid of my TS55.  I went with the Makita 36V.  The difference is dramatic.  Not only is there more power but it's also spinning the blade 20% faster than the TS55.  It has the same constant torque/speed that the TS55 but it's much quieter/smoother and lacks the "growl" of the TS55's electronics.  The stock blade on the Makita is crazy good and is $40 to replace. 

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1794
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #39 on: June 21, 2018, 11:05 AM »
Really ?  Really ?  So when cutting down an antique custom pine door 1 3/4” to 2” thick y’all with your ts55’s have to switch to the panther blade ?

Yes. I would even switch to a rip blade on a table saw if I were cutting wood that thick, hardwood or soft wood. It's not only about the power of the saw, it's also about a blade with the number of teeth, set of the teeth, and the size of the gullet between the teeth not being able to clear out the saw dust and chips effectively. This tends to make the blade perform less effectively and doesn't let the blade do its job as intended. Have I ripped 2" wood with a combination blade on a table saw. Guess I have, but only when I didn't have a rip blade handy. I haven't done that in many years though. Safer.
Randy

Online Dick Mahany

  • Posts: 299
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #40 on: June 21, 2018, 11:24 AM »
Yes. I would even switch to a rip blade on a table saw if I were cutting wood that thick, hardwood or soft wood. It's not only about the power of the saw, it's also about a blade with the number of teeth, set of the teeth, and the size of the gullet between the teeth not being able to clear out the saw dust and chips effectively. This tends to make the blade perform less effectively and doesn't let the blade do its job as intended. Have I ripped 2" wood with a combination blade on a table saw. Guess I have, but only when I didn't have a rip blade handy. I haven't done that in many years though. Safer.

Totally agree.  I've been a blade changer for years both on my table saw and with my TS55.  The right blade for the particular operation produces the best result with the least amount of effort and is safer.  The few seconds it takes to perform a blade change are more than compensated for in the long run in terms of time and cut quality.

Offline yetihunter

  • Posts: 567
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #41 on: June 21, 2018, 06:01 PM »
Just so that I can partake in the sack pyramid:  6" 48t blade on a dinky sidewinder is like an 80-96t on a 110v contractor saw. 
That's insane.


Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 11412
  • Another Avatar Coming Soon
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #42 on: June 21, 2018, 06:46 PM »
It takes less than 60 seconds to change a blade on a TS-55.  Why not cut the best cut and cause the least wear on your tool?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BixH1v5nZvI/?hl=en&taken-by=festoolsedge

Peter
« Last Edit: June 21, 2018, 06:49 PM by Peter Halle »

Offline RussellS

  • Posts: 208
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #43 on: June 21, 2018, 06:49 PM »
Agree with the blade changers.  On my table saw I always change to the right blade.  Many teeth crosscut, or lesser teeth rip.  Unfortunately for me, my rip blade has too many teeth.  Power is one reason.  Quality of cut is more important.  I want every cut to be perfectly smooth, so I use the right blade.  I have the rip and cross/combo blade for my TS55.  I have no problems changing the blade.  When I plane wood with my handplanes, I switch to the right plane.  When using my sanders, I switch paper grit to get the right smoothness.  When I am driving finish nails, I use my lighter hammer.  When driving 16 penny spikes, I use the heavy framing hammer.  Not sure there are too many tools that do everything perfectly in all situations with no changes or modifications whatsoever.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4676
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #44 on: June 21, 2018, 09:41 PM »
I can’t really imagine using 600 grit sand paper to cut through 10 layers of old paint. Just put the right disc on the sander... and put the right blade on the saw. Easy...peasy.

Offline RussellS

  • Posts: 208
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #45 on: June 21, 2018, 10:59 PM »
I can’t really imagine using 600 grit sand paper to cut through 10 layers of old paint. Just put the right disc on the sander... and put the right blade on the saw. Easy...peasy.

You may not be able to imagine it, but it would work.  Using only 400 or 600 grit sandpaper would "Eventually" smooth down any piece of wood.  It might take hours instead of minutes using 40, 80, 120, 220, 400 grit.  But it would work eventually.  Kind of like using the 80 tooth crosscut blade to rip.  It will work if you go "Real" slow.  But better to just switch to a rip blade.

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 393
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #46 on: June 22, 2018, 12:46 AM »
I can’t really imagine using 600 grit sand paper to cut through 10 layers of old paint. Just put the right disc on the sander... and put the right blade on the saw. Easy...peasy.

You may not be able to imagine it, but it would work.  Using only 400 or 600 grit sandpaper would "Eventually" smooth down any piece of wood.  It might take hours instead of minutes using 40, 80, 120, 220, 400 grit.  But it would work eventually.  Kind of like using the 80 tooth crosscut blade to rip.  It will work if you go "Real" slow.  But better to just switch to a rip blade.

Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 393
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #47 on: June 22, 2018, 12:51 AM »
The TS 55 is a plywood saw.  I would never use it for dimensional lumber of any kind.  Your friend is using the wrong Saw for the job.  He should be using the TS 75, Makita, Mafell or the soon to be release Bosch Track Saw.

I would think the Makita 36 V and TS 75 would have the same power.  The TS 75 is bigger, heavier and can do deeepr cuts.  The Makita would be more Light and agile, more economic but can’t cut at the same depth as the TS 75.   
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4676
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #48 on: June 22, 2018, 02:49 AM »
You may not be able to imagine it, but it would work.  Using only 400 or 600 grit sandpaper would "Eventually" smooth down any piece of wood.  It might take hours instead of minutes using 40, 80, 120, 220, 400 grit.  But it would work eventually.  Kind of like using the 80 tooth crosscut blade to rip.  It will work if you go "Real" slow.  But better to just switch to a rip blade.

You’re right I can’t imagine it.

However, let’s get past this “eventually” thing and just agree to swap out saw blades and be done with it.

Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 209
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #49 on: June 22, 2018, 08:57 AM »
Agree with the blade changers.  On my table saw I always change to the right blade.  Many teeth crosscut, or lesser teeth rip.  Unfortunately for me, my rip blade has too many teeth.  Power is one reason.  Quality of cut is more important.  I want every cut to be perfectly smooth, so I use the right blade. 

I have a 30 year old 1 1/2HP Delta Contractors saw that wears one blade all the time, a Forrest Woodworker II.  Rip, crosscut, mitre this blade provides a quality cut.  After probably 25 years of use I sent it back to Forrest for sharpening a few months back.  Wow!  While it still worked well I had forgotten how silky this blade was when really sharp.  Best $32 I've spent in a long time!

Offline Joe Felchlin

  • Posts: 106
  • Just another day in paradise - Livin’ the dream!
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #50 on: June 22, 2018, 10:20 AM »
In Reply #28 of this thread l espoused the virtue of my TS 75: “The ‘75 meets all my needs” - And said: “Yea... I may buy a lighter saw at some point - Age being a possible ‘game changer’.”

Well.. A TS 55 REQ came available on Festool’s Recon site at a great price -
And I succumbed (once again) to the temptation of the “Green Kool Aid”.
This threads title should have forewarned me: “TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem”.
The saw arrived DOA.
(And...  To boot - The Blade wasn’t aligned to the Base at 90 degrees, when indicated.)
“Silly me”. I thought Festool actually RECONDITIONED these tools -
And at a minimum - Somebody plugged ‘em and pulled the trigger.
Had to go through the hassle of repacking the saw, filling out the paperwork, and hauling it to UPS. It’s on its way to Festool Service.
What a frustration. [mad]

I must say that I bought another Recon Sale item - A CT 26 Dust Extractor - And have had no problems so far.
But... A year or so ago I bought a new DF 700 XL Domino Joiner that’s sight gauge couldn’t be aligned - Even after two trips to Festool Service - And a lot of hassle.
(Eventually, after intervention by Tyler C and Festool Germany HQ - Festool sent me a new one.)

I understand that nothing/no one is perfect.
But, the the last few years, it seems more and more is “slipping through the cracks” with Festool.
This latest experience only reaffirms what I continue to read regularly on the FOG.
It appears that in recent years Festool’s Quality Assurance continues to decline -
As they “trade off” of “yesterday’s” reputation.
Come on Festool. We’re trying to “keep the faith”. Be what you claim to be.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2018, 02:32 PM by Joe Felchlin »
FESTOOL: CT26 and CT33 E HEPA Dust Extractors, MFT 1080, MFT-3, TS 55 REQ-F-Plus USA, TS75 EQ, Guide Rails: 1080's/1400/3000mm, LR 32-SYS/Holey Rail, Parallel Guides and Extensions, OF1400 EQ Plunge Router, OF1010 EQ Plunge Router, HL 850 Planer, RO125 FEQ Rotex Sander, LS 130 EQ Linear Detail Sander, DX93E Detail Sander, C12 Cordless Drill, CXS Cordless Compact Drill Driver, SYS-Centrotec-Set, Domino XL DF 700 EQ Plus Tenon Joiner Set, Domino DF 500 Tenon Joiner | WOODPECKERS: DF 500 Offset Base System | BOSCH: 5412L Compound Miter Saw, 4100-09 10-Inch Table Saw | POWERMATIC: 60HH 8" Jointer, PWBS 14" Bandsaw w/Riser Block | MAKITA: 2012NB Bench Top Planer | JESSEM: Mast-R-Lift XL/Fence/Slide, Rout-R-Plate/Table Stand | RIKON: 50-120 6inX48in Belt-Disc Sander | JET: JBOS-5 Benchtop Oscillating Spindle Sander | PORTER CABLE: 7518 and 690LVRS Routers, 557 Pro Plate Joiner, 16/18/23 Gauge Nailers | LEIGH JIGS: D4R 24 Pro Dovetail Jig, FMT Pro Mortise & Tenon Jig | LIE-NIELSEN: Almost every hand plane | DOWELMAX: 3/8" and 1/4" | KREG: K3 Master System | FEIN: Multimaster FMM 250 Q Kit | TORMEK: Super-Grind 2000 | DUST DEPUTY: Industrial (ALL) Steel Deluxe Cyclone (2)

Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7344
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #51 on: June 22, 2018, 04:33 PM »
It takes less than 60 seconds to change a blade on a TS-55.  Why not cut the best cut and cause the least wear on your tool?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BixH1v5nZvI/?hl=en&taken-by=festoolsedge

Peter

Devil's advocate.  Why spend the time and extra expense on another blade(s) to do the what the Makita 36V can do with stock blade?
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline glass1

  • Posts: 412
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #52 on: June 22, 2018, 04:54 PM »
Blade change lovers, well not all of us use track saws to only build cabinets. If I only built Cabinets I would get the right tool, a sliding table saw. I am a woodworker and I use the track saw often to edge join long pieces. Ie a 48 tooth blade on the Makita makes a glue ready cut in mahogany. On my current job I have ripped well over 200 ft of 3/4” flat sawed mahogany and still have 2 bars of battery. That being said the Makita is killer save one thing the slop adjusters need to be checked often especially on joined rails. I may pick up the tsc 55 if it’s got the power. 2 tracks saws are better than one, 1 adjusted to rip rail 1 adjusted to the cross cut rail.

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 11412
  • Another Avatar Coming Soon
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #53 on: June 22, 2018, 05:31 PM »
It takes less than 60 seconds to change a blade on a TS-55.  Why not cut the best cut and cause the least wear on your tool?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BixH1v5nZvI/?hl=en&taken-by=festoolsedge

Peter

Devil's advocate.  Why spend the time and extra expense on another blade(s) to do the what the Makita 36V can do with stock blade?

Because it is cheaper than buying a Makita 36v?  Or because you already have a TS-55 and other blades?

Peter

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 393
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #54 on: June 22, 2018, 11:39 PM »
It takes less than 60 seconds to change a blade on a TS-55.  Why not cut the best cut and cause the least wear on your tool?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BixH1v5nZvI/?hl=en&taken-by=festoolsedge

Peter

Devil's advocate.  Why spend the time and extra expense on another blade(s) to do the what the Makita 36V can do with stock blade?

Because it is cheaper than buying a Makita 36v?  Or because you already have a TS-55 and other blades?

Peter

Peter, I wouldn’t call the Makita 36 Volt cheaper by any means.  By the time you buy the saw, battery packs and track, the price is about the same as the more capable TS 75. 

I think people make too big of deal about the weight of the TS 75.  It’s only 3 1/4 pounds heavier than the TS 75.  The Makita blades don’t have matched Kerfs like the TS 75.  The Makita forces you to change strips with blades changes. 

I’m a bit puzzled why anyone would compare the TS 75 against the Makita.  The TS 75 can handle thicker hardwoods and a wider range of materials than the Makita 36 V. 
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1794
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #55 on: June 22, 2018, 11:52 PM »
Blade change lovers, well not all of us use track saws to only build cabinets. If I only built Cabinets I would get the right tool, a sliding table saw. I am a woodworker and I use the track saw often to edge join long pieces. Ie a 48 tooth blade on the Makita makes a glue ready cut in mahogany. On my current job I have ripped well over 200 ft of 3/4” flat sawed mahogany and still have 2 bars of battery. That being said the Makita is killer save one thing the slop adjusters need to be checked often especially on joined rails. I may pick up the tsc 55 if it’s got the power. 2 tracks saws are better than one, 1 adjusted to rip rail 1 adjusted to the cross cut rail.

3/4" probably is OK, but the original post indicated 1 1/2" ripping (or plunging 1 1/2" into a board thicker than that) which I think would likely put more stress on any motor if using a 48-tooth blade. I have ripped 3/4" hardwood with the TS55 and a 48-tooth blade, but wouldn't even think of trying 1 1/2" rips with that blade.
Randy

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 11412
  • Another Avatar Coming Soon
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #56 on: June 23, 2018, 02:29 AM »
It takes less than 60 seconds to change a blade on a TS-55.  Why not cut the best cut and cause the least wear on your tool?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BixH1v5nZvI/?hl=en&taken-by=festoolsedge

Peter

Devil's advocate.  Why spend the time and extra expense on another blade(s) to do the what the Makita 36V can do with stock blade?

Because it is cheaper than buying a Makita 36v?  Or because you already have a TS-55 and other blades?

Peter

Peter, I wouldn’t call the Makita 36 Volt cheaper by any means.  By the time you buy the saw, battery packs and track, the price is about the same as the more capable TS 75. 

I think people make too big of deal about the weight of the TS 75.  It’s only 3 1/4 pounds heavier than the TS 75.  The Makita blades don’t have matched Kerfs like the TS 75.  The Makita forces you to change strips with blades changes. 

I’m a bit puzzled why anyone would compare the TS 75 against the Makita.  The TS 75 can handle thicker hardwoods and a wider range of materials than the Makita 36 V.

To change blades on an existing TS-55 is cheaper than buying a Makita 36 v.

Offline glass1

  • Posts: 412
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #57 on: June 23, 2018, 07:12 AM »
I recently rehabbed 2 antique barn doors. 2” thick. Plenty of rip cuts. 48 tooth blade. No problem in southern yellow pine for Makita. Paid $399 with charger 4 batteries 2 Systainers and a rail. Only need the 48 tooth blade.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4676
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #58 on: June 23, 2018, 09:45 AM »
TSC 55 with a 28T universal blade

White oak, 1 7/8" thick



Walnut, 1 3/4" thick

« Last Edit: June 23, 2018, 09:58 AM by Cheese »

Offline glass1

  • Posts: 412
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #59 on: June 23, 2018, 02:46 PM »
Cool  [big grin].  Nice

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 393
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #60 on: June 23, 2018, 03:01 PM »
I recently rehabbed 2 antique barn doors. 2” thick. Plenty of rip cuts. 48 tooth blade. No problem in southern yellow pine for Makita. Paid $399 with charger 4 batteries 2 Systainers and a rail. Only need the 48 tooth blade.

You can only get those deals as a US citizen. Most of the vendors offering that package won’t ship out of the US lower 48.  Everywhere else you get royally screwed over on the price of the Makita 36 V Track Saw.
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7344
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #61 on: June 24, 2018, 10:18 AM »
To change blades on an existing TS-55 is cheaper than buying a Makita 36 v.

If you already own the TS55.  If you are in the market for a track saw then you're way ahead with the Makita (on price, value I can't say).  I'll be looking for a new track in the not so distance future.  A few years ago I wouldn't have even bothered looking at any other brand.  Now, I'll be looking at Festool last.  I'm not saying the Festool saws are bad, its just the other guys are really stepping up their game. 
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 11412
  • Another Avatar Coming Soon
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #62 on: June 24, 2018, 10:42 AM »
@Brice Burrell , my answer was based on the post about having trouble ripping the 2x material with an already existing TS-55.  I wasn’t knocking Makita (I haven’t even looked at it).

The tracksaw market will continue to expand and models will come out from all sorts of manufacturers.  Each will bring their strengths and lesser strengths.  I certainly hope the Festool has improvements in the hopper for the TS-55 because they aren’t the only horse in the barn anymore.  Now that tracksaws are more common place Festool will have to come out with some pretty cool features to compete better with the newer models from other manufacturers.  I was told that 2019 was going to be a big year but who knows.

Hope you are surviving the hot, muggy, wet weather!

Peter

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 393
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #63 on: June 26, 2018, 02:51 AM »
@Brice Burrell , my answer was based on the post about having trouble ripping the 2x material with an already existing TS-55.  I wasn’t knocking Makita (I haven’t even looked at it).

The tracksaw market will continue to expand and models will come out from all sorts of manufacturers.  Each will bring their strengths and lesser strengths.  I certainly hope the Festool has improvements in the hopper for the TS-55 because they aren’t the only horse in the barn anymore.  Now that tracksaws are more common place Festool will have to come out with some pretty cool features to compete better with the newer models from other manufacturers.  I was told that 2019 was going to be a big year but who knows.

Hope you are surviving the hot, muggy, wet weather!

Peter

Festool designs it’s product line around choosing the right tool for the job.  A lot of American and Canadian users have unrealistic expectations that tool should be a jack-of-all trades.

In this case, it’s not a TS-55 reliability issue; it’s actually a case of user error.  The TS-55 is a dedicated lightweight plywood cutting saw.  The TS55 was never intened for cutting high resin softwood lumber.  That’s the job of a TS75. 
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline glass1

  • Posts: 412
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #64 on: June 26, 2018, 06:39 AM »
That’s right, one could spend $1500 on festool to do 90% of your cuts or $500 on Makita. heck even the $1000 for the mafell mt55 is a better buy. So why give it 2” cutting capacity but not 2” cutting ability. You my son define “festool apologist”.  Instead of defending a festool miss push the company to do better by pointing how and it what ways the competition is better. So why can the tsc55 make cuts that the ts55 cannot ?

Offline Jmacpherson

  • Posts: 164
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #65 on: June 26, 2018, 11:14 AM »
Devil's advocate.  Why spend the time and extra expense on another blade(s) to do the what the Makita 36V can do with stock blade?
I no longer own my TS55 because I feel the Makita 36v has more power and can do more for less. Festool accessories are just getting way too expensive here.
In my country if I bought the 48t, 28t, 12t Festool blades their cost together = 60% of the cost of the Makita 36v saw and I already own Makita batteries. Makita blades are cheaper and I can run the Bosch blades (made by Freud) on the saw if I choose.

I have made 4x 500-600mm long rip cuts in 20mm Ironwood and 16mm solid Walnut with the Makita 36v like the wood wasn't even there. Effortless and this was with the 56t blade. This was with a dust bag attached, no vac.
My TS55 (with vac) struggled in 25mm Oak and 22mm Iroko with 350mm long rips, did the cuts but left burn marks and I could feel the struggle. 28tooth was better for the saw.

Was a no brainer in the end for me, sold the TS55 basically covered the cost of the Makita.

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 393
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #66 on: June 26, 2018, 01:25 PM »
Devil's advocate.  Why spend the time and extra expense on another blade(s) to do the what the Makita 36V can do with stock blade?
I no longer own my TS55 because I feel the Makita 36v has more power and can do more for less. Festool accessories are just getting way too expensive here.
In my country if I bought the 48t, 28t, 12t Festool blades their cost together = 60% of the cost of the Makita 36v saw and I already own Makita batteries. Makita blades are cheaper and I can run the Bosch blades (made by Freud) on the saw if I choose.

I have made 4x 500-600mm long rip cuts in 20mm Ironwood and 16mm solid Walnut with the Makita 36v like the wood wasn't even there. Effortless and this was with the 56t blade. This was with a dust bag attached, no vac.
My TS55 (with vac) struggled in 25mm Oak and 22mm Iroko with 350mm long rips, did the cuts but left burn marks and I could feel the struggle. 28tooth was better for the saw.

Was a no brainer in the end for me, sold the TS55 basically covered the cost of the Makita.

Makita has a very good saw without a doubt.  The rails are insanely cheap compared to Festool.  I haven’t really seen anything in the overall design of the Festool rail that justifies the exorbitant prices.  The Festool tool rail is nearly exactly the same as a Makita rail just painted green.     
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline Motor

  • Posts: 26
  • Owner of Finishing Touch Carpentry
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #67 on: June 27, 2018, 06:43 AM »
I work side by side with a subcontractor of mine who occasionally uses his TS 55 saw. We both own the same saw and know how to properly use it. He just had his armature replaced for the second time for a cost of $150 plus shipping. This time it was not under warranty.

This is what happened:  The saw began "burning up" while cutting 1.5" deep through yellow pine with a fresh blade. We were cutting at a slow pace for a total of 12 LF. We had a total of 4 cuts to make. We pulled out the makita circular saw to finish the project and it breezed the cuts.

This saw was not abused and had 2 repairs of the same nature. Festool charges a premium for their tools. I own several Festool tools. I strongly question the reliability of the festool track saw and may look to other manufactures for future tools. Has anyone else had this kind of trouble?

I was using my 55 to trim doors lengthwise and found it wasn't up to the job. I called the dealer and he suggested purchasing a 75 so I did. He explained the 55 has a clutch and the 75 doesn't. Since then I use the 75 for ripping 1.5" stock like doors, and the 55 for sheet goods.

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2470
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #68 on: June 27, 2018, 06:59 AM »
For clarification, the TS75 has the slip-clutch and the 55 does not. The 75 also has 400 watts more power than the 55, FWIW.

Offline Sanderxpander

  • Posts: 160
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #69 on: June 27, 2018, 05:12 PM »
My TS55 bogged down cutting a door of 4cm (I guess about 1.5 inches). I just put in the ripping blade and it worked fine. The next time I did it I had the combination blade in and that worked fine too.