Author Topic: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem  (Read 9067 times)

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Offline lunchman

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #30 on: May 06, 2018, 06:21 PM »
A number of weeks ago I needed to make a 45 deg rip cut in a 2x4 to fill in the gap in a 45 deg wall I had framed. The TS55 was out and available, my portable table saw was not. I set up the track saw, got about 18" into the cut, the saw started to bind and tripped my 15 amp garage breaker (one reason I'm building a shop in the basement). I've used the TS55 for plenty of 3/4" plywood cuts, have never used it on 2x4s.

I was somewhat surprised, but realizing I'm using the stock blade and knowing the saw is a bit underpowered, not that surprised. I pulled out the DeWalt table saw, angled the blade and finished the cut. Sure it would be nice if the TS55 had managed the cut and not struggled but in this case it was a matter of using the wrong tool which I immediately realized.

-Dom




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Offline mtbev

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #31 on: May 06, 2018, 06:53 PM »
We were cutting a 3 " thick glulam beam. Started the cut with 1.5" deep on one side then cut 1.5" deep on the other after flipping the beam. We were making a heavy duty table by gluing up 2 glulams. The intention was to straight line two pieces of glulam in order to glue them together to make a 30 " wide table top.

I still can't get over the inability to cut more than 12 LF at 1.5" deep and the saw gave up.

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #32 on: May 06, 2018, 08:31 PM »
We were cutting a 3 " thick glulam beam. Started the cut with 1.5" deep on one side then cut 1.5" deep on the other after flipping the beam. We were making a heavy duty table by gluing up 2 glulams. The intention was to straight line two pieces of glulam in order to glue them together to make a 30 " wide table top.

I still can't get over the inability to cut more than 12 LF at 1.5" deep and the saw gave up.

Since the teeth of the saw were buried in the kerf the lack of dust extraction was a factor. Without positive dust extraction more of that resinous sawdust stayed in the gullets and spread out in the kerf as the teeth carved out more dust increasing friction and contributed to overloading the saw.

I've never been a fan of the ATF and TS speed control tech. They hold back a significant amount of power in order to "give you more" when the going gets tough. I'd rather just have it all, or at least the option to have full power.

Offline grbmds

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #33 on: May 07, 2018, 10:45 AM »
A lot of replies, but I think the most important information was the advice to use a 28 tooth or less blade made for ripping. Even on a table saw, I do sometimes use a combination blade for ripping but never on 1 1/2" material, regardless of whether it's hardwood or pine. The combination blades just can't handle ripping material that thick well; sometimes not at all. Given the length of the rip it would be even more important to use a blade meant for ripping.
Randy

Offline fiftythree

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #34 on: May 08, 2018, 10:46 AM »
I've never had a problem ripping walnut, maple, white oak and sapele with my TS55 when using a Freud Rip blade. I did try and use the 48 tooth blade and it did bog the saw down, but that blade isn't made for rip cuts so I wasn't surprised. Just switched it out for the rip blade on the next cut and had no problems.

Maybe the Makita has enough extra power to use a blade for a purpose it wasn't designed for. My Bosch CS20 stalled cross cutting some walnut with a 60 tooth blade in it and it's a 15 AMP saw so there could be a lot of factors. Certain boards have stresses in them and others don't.

Offline epicxt

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #35 on: May 08, 2018, 11:04 AM »

I've never had a problem ripping walnut, maple, white oak and sapele with my TS55 when using a Freud Rip blade. I did try and use the 48 tooth blade and it did bog the saw down, but that blade isn't made for rip cuts so I wasn't surprised. Just switched it out for the rip blade on the next cut and had no
+1
I just finished up a kitchen counter replacement where I ended up making the backsplash out of a leftover 6' section of the 1.5" thick maple butcher block material. I forgot to bring my ts75 to the site, so tossed the 12 tooth blade in the ts55 and ripped six 4" strips before re sawing them on the bandsaw and running them through the planer. Had no problems and the saw plowed through the cuts pretty quickly.
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Offline yetihunter

  • Posts: 570
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #36 on: June 20, 2018, 04:12 PM »
I don't want to come across as a condescending armchair carpenter, but I wouldn't try ripping 2x Pine with a 48t blade in my Mafell tracksaw.   So what if the TS55 is 200 watts less than this saw or that saw?  That's not the problem.   

Online glass1

  • Posts: 431
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #37 on: June 20, 2018, 08:09 PM »
Really ?  Really ?  So when cutting down an antique custom pine door 1 3/4” to 2” thick y’all with your ts55’s have to switch to the panther blade ? You know true doors that need to be cut are cross cuts and rips.  And yes my Makita has got the power to rip cut pine wth a 48 tooth blade, effortlessly.  End of story, some festools just miss the mark, the ts55 is purposefully underpowered to not take market share from the ts75. Some festool products rock, domino remote control vac., routers, the planer is a little awkward but when you need you need it.

Offline TheSergeant

  • Posts: 91
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #38 on: June 20, 2018, 08:42 PM »
This is why I got rid of my TS55.  I went with the Makita 36V.  The difference is dramatic.  Not only is there more power but it's also spinning the blade 20% faster than the TS55.  It has the same constant torque/speed that the TS55 but it's much quieter/smoother and lacks the "growl" of the TS55's electronics.  The stock blade on the Makita is crazy good and is $40 to replace. 

Offline grbmds

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #39 on: June 21, 2018, 11:05 AM »
Really ?  Really ?  So when cutting down an antique custom pine door 1 3/4” to 2” thick y’all with your ts55’s have to switch to the panther blade ?

Yes. I would even switch to a rip blade on a table saw if I were cutting wood that thick, hardwood or soft wood. It's not only about the power of the saw, it's also about a blade with the number of teeth, set of the teeth, and the size of the gullet between the teeth not being able to clear out the saw dust and chips effectively. This tends to make the blade perform less effectively and doesn't let the blade do its job as intended. Have I ripped 2" wood with a combination blade on a table saw. Guess I have, but only when I didn't have a rip blade handy. I haven't done that in many years though. Safer.
Randy

Offline Dick Mahany

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #40 on: June 21, 2018, 11:24 AM »
Yes. I would even switch to a rip blade on a table saw if I were cutting wood that thick, hardwood or soft wood. It's not only about the power of the saw, it's also about a blade with the number of teeth, set of the teeth, and the size of the gullet between the teeth not being able to clear out the saw dust and chips effectively. This tends to make the blade perform less effectively and doesn't let the blade do its job as intended. Have I ripped 2" wood with a combination blade on a table saw. Guess I have, but only when I didn't have a rip blade handy. I haven't done that in many years though. Safer.

Totally agree.  I've been a blade changer for years both on my table saw and with my TS55.  The right blade for the particular operation produces the best result with the least amount of effort and is safer.  The few seconds it takes to perform a blade change are more than compensated for in the long run in terms of time and cut quality.

Offline yetihunter

  • Posts: 570
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #41 on: June 21, 2018, 06:01 PM »
Just so that I can partake in the sack pyramid:  6" 48t blade on a dinky sidewinder is like an 80-96t on a 110v contractor saw. 
That's insane.


Offline Peter Halle

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #42 on: June 21, 2018, 06:46 PM »
It takes less than 60 seconds to change a blade on a TS-55.  Why not cut the best cut and cause the least wear on your tool?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BixH1v5nZvI/?hl=en&taken-by=festoolsedge

Peter
« Last Edit: June 21, 2018, 06:49 PM by Peter Halle »

Offline RussellS

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #43 on: June 21, 2018, 06:49 PM »
Agree with the blade changers.  On my table saw I always change to the right blade.  Many teeth crosscut, or lesser teeth rip.  Unfortunately for me, my rip blade has too many teeth.  Power is one reason.  Quality of cut is more important.  I want every cut to be perfectly smooth, so I use the right blade.  I have the rip and cross/combo blade for my TS55.  I have no problems changing the blade.  When I plane wood with my handplanes, I switch to the right plane.  When using my sanders, I switch paper grit to get the right smoothness.  When I am driving finish nails, I use my lighter hammer.  When driving 16 penny spikes, I use the heavy framing hammer.  Not sure there are too many tools that do everything perfectly in all situations with no changes or modifications whatsoever.

Offline Cheese

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #44 on: June 21, 2018, 09:41 PM »
I can’t really imagine using 600 grit sand paper to cut through 10 layers of old paint. Just put the right disc on the sander... and put the right blade on the saw. Easy...peasy.

Offline RussellS

  • Posts: 219
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #45 on: June 21, 2018, 10:59 PM »
I can’t really imagine using 600 grit sand paper to cut through 10 layers of old paint. Just put the right disc on the sander... and put the right blade on the saw. Easy...peasy.

You may not be able to imagine it, but it would work.  Using only 400 or 600 grit sandpaper would "Eventually" smooth down any piece of wood.  It might take hours instead of minutes using 40, 80, 120, 220, 400 grit.  But it would work eventually.  Kind of like using the 80 tooth crosscut blade to rip.  It will work if you go "Real" slow.  But better to just switch to a rip blade.

Offline Steven Owen

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #46 on: June 22, 2018, 12:46 AM »
I can’t really imagine using 600 grit sand paper to cut through 10 layers of old paint. Just put the right disc on the sander... and put the right blade on the saw. Easy...peasy.

You may not be able to imagine it, but it would work.  Using only 400 or 600 grit sandpaper would "Eventually" smooth down any piece of wood.  It might take hours instead of minutes using 40, 80, 120, 220, 400 grit.  But it would work eventually.  Kind of like using the 80 tooth crosscut blade to rip.  It will work if you go "Real" slow.  But better to just switch to a rip blade.

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Offline Steven Owen

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #47 on: June 22, 2018, 12:51 AM »
The TS 55 is a plywood saw.  I would never use it for dimensional lumber of any kind.  Your friend is using the wrong Saw for the job.  He should be using the TS 75, Makita, Mafell or the soon to be release Bosch Track Saw.

I would think the Makita 36 V and TS 75 would have the same power.  The TS 75 is bigger, heavier and can do deeepr cuts.  The Makita would be more Light and agile, more economic but can’t cut at the same depth as the TS 75.   
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5060
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #48 on: June 22, 2018, 02:49 AM »
You may not be able to imagine it, but it would work.  Using only 400 or 600 grit sandpaper would "Eventually" smooth down any piece of wood.  It might take hours instead of minutes using 40, 80, 120, 220, 400 grit.  But it would work eventually.  Kind of like using the 80 tooth crosscut blade to rip.  It will work if you go "Real" slow.  But better to just switch to a rip blade.

You’re right I can’t imagine it.

However, let’s get past this “eventually” thing and just agree to swap out saw blades and be done with it.

Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 231
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #49 on: June 22, 2018, 08:57 AM »
Agree with the blade changers.  On my table saw I always change to the right blade.  Many teeth crosscut, or lesser teeth rip.  Unfortunately for me, my rip blade has too many teeth.  Power is one reason.  Quality of cut is more important.  I want every cut to be perfectly smooth, so I use the right blade. 

I have a 30 year old 1 1/2HP Delta Contractors saw that wears one blade all the time, a Forrest Woodworker II.  Rip, crosscut, mitre this blade provides a quality cut.  After probably 25 years of use I sent it back to Forrest for sharpening a few months back.  Wow!  While it still worked well I had forgotten how silky this blade was when really sharp.  Best $32 I've spent in a long time!

Offline Joe Felchlin

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #50 on: June 22, 2018, 10:20 AM »
In Reply #28 of this thread l espoused the virtue of my TS 75: “The ‘75 meets all my needs” - And said: “Yea... I may buy a lighter saw at some point - Age being a possible ‘game changer’.”

Well.. A TS 55 REQ came available on Festool’s Recon site at a great price -
And I succumbed (once again) to the temptation of the “Green Kool Aid”.
This threads title should have forewarned me: “TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem”.
The saw arrived DOA.
(And...  To boot - The Blade wasn’t aligned to the Base at 90 degrees, when indicated.)
“Silly me”. I thought Festool actually RECONDITIONED these tools -
And at a minimum - Somebody plugged ‘em and pulled the trigger.
Had to go through the hassle of repacking the saw, filling out the paperwork, and hauling it to UPS. It’s on its way to Festool Service.
What a frustration. [mad]

I must say that I bought another Recon Sale item - A CT 26 Dust Extractor - And have had no problems so far.
But... A year or so ago I bought a new DF 700 XL Domino Joiner that’s sight gauge couldn’t be aligned - Even after two trips to Festool Service - And a lot of hassle.
(Eventually, after intervention by Tyler C and Festool Germany HQ - Festool sent me a new one.)

I understand that nothing/no one is perfect.
But, the the last few years, it seems more and more is “slipping through the cracks” with Festool.
This latest experience only reaffirms what I continue to read regularly on the FOG.
It appears that in recent years Festool’s Quality Assurance continues to decline -
As they “trade off” of “yesterday’s” reputation.
Come on Festool. We’re trying to “keep the faith”. Be what you claim to be.
« Last Edit: June 22, 2018, 02:32 PM by Joe Felchlin »
FESTOOL: CT26 and CT33 E HEPA Dust Extractors, MFT 1080, MFT-3, TS 55 REQ-F-Plus USA, TS75 EQ, Guide Rails: 1080's/1400/3000mm, LR 32-SYS/Holey Rail, Parallel Guides and Extensions, OF1400 EQ Plunge Router, OF1010 EQ Plunge Router, HL 850 Planer, RO125 FEQ Rotex Sander, LS 130 EQ Linear Detail Sander, DX93E Detail Sander, C12 Cordless Drill, CXS Cordless Compact Drill Driver, SYS-Centrotec-Set, Domino XL DF 700 EQ Plus Tenon Joiner Set, Domino DF 500 Tenon Joiner | WOODPECKERS: DF 500 Offset Base System | BOSCH: 5412L Compound Miter Saw, 4100-09 10-Inch Table Saw | POWERMATIC: 60HH 8" Jointer, PWBS 14" Bandsaw w/Riser Block | MAKITA: 2012NB Bench Top Planer | JESSEM: Mast-R-Lift XL/Fence/Slide, Rout-R-Plate/Table Stand | RIKON: 50-120 6inX48in Belt-Disc Sander | JET: JBOS-5 Benchtop Oscillating Spindle Sander | PORTER CABLE: 7518 and 690LVRS Routers, 557 Pro Plate Joiner, 16/18/23 Gauge Nailers | LEIGH JIGS: D4R 24 Pro Dovetail Jig, FMT Pro Mortise & Tenon Jig | LIE-NIELSEN: Almost every hand plane | DOWELMAX: 3/8" and 1/4" | KREG: K3 Master System | FEIN: Multimaster FMM 250 Q Kit | TORMEK: Super-Grind 2000 | DUST DEPUTY: Industrial (ALL) Steel Deluxe Cyclone (2)

Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #51 on: June 22, 2018, 04:33 PM »
It takes less than 60 seconds to change a blade on a TS-55.  Why not cut the best cut and cause the least wear on your tool?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BixH1v5nZvI/?hl=en&taken-by=festoolsedge

Peter

Devil's advocate.  Why spend the time and extra expense on another blade(s) to do the what the Makita 36V can do with stock blade?
Check out my new blog, The Green and Dark Blue Blog.

Online glass1

  • Posts: 431
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #52 on: June 22, 2018, 04:54 PM »
Blade change lovers, well not all of us use track saws to only build cabinets. If I only built Cabinets I would get the right tool, a sliding table saw. I am a woodworker and I use the track saw often to edge join long pieces. Ie a 48 tooth blade on the Makita makes a glue ready cut in mahogany. On my current job I have ripped well over 200 ft of 3/4” flat sawed mahogany and still have 2 bars of battery. That being said the Makita is killer save one thing the slop adjusters need to be checked often especially on joined rails. I may pick up the tsc 55 if it’s got the power. 2 tracks saws are better than one, 1 adjusted to rip rail 1 adjusted to the cross cut rail.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #53 on: June 22, 2018, 05:31 PM »
It takes less than 60 seconds to change a blade on a TS-55.  Why not cut the best cut and cause the least wear on your tool?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BixH1v5nZvI/?hl=en&taken-by=festoolsedge

Peter

Devil's advocate.  Why spend the time and extra expense on another blade(s) to do the what the Makita 36V can do with stock blade?

Because it is cheaper than buying a Makita 36v?  Or because you already have a TS-55 and other blades?

Peter

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 409
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #54 on: June 22, 2018, 11:39 PM »
It takes less than 60 seconds to change a blade on a TS-55.  Why not cut the best cut and cause the least wear on your tool?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BixH1v5nZvI/?hl=en&taken-by=festoolsedge

Peter

Devil's advocate.  Why spend the time and extra expense on another blade(s) to do the what the Makita 36V can do with stock blade?

Because it is cheaper than buying a Makita 36v?  Or because you already have a TS-55 and other blades?

Peter

Peter, I wouldn’t call the Makita 36 Volt cheaper by any means.  By the time you buy the saw, battery packs and track, the price is about the same as the more capable TS 75. 

I think people make too big of deal about the weight of the TS 75.  It’s only 3 1/4 pounds heavier than the TS 75.  The Makita blades don’t have matched Kerfs like the TS 75.  The Makita forces you to change strips with blades changes. 

I’m a bit puzzled why anyone would compare the TS 75 against the Makita.  The TS 75 can handle thicker hardwoods and a wider range of materials than the Makita 36 V. 
Festool CT Midi, Festool ETS 125, DF 700 Domino Coming Soon

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1808
Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #55 on: June 22, 2018, 11:52 PM »
Blade change lovers, well not all of us use track saws to only build cabinets. If I only built Cabinets I would get the right tool, a sliding table saw. I am a woodworker and I use the track saw often to edge join long pieces. Ie a 48 tooth blade on the Makita makes a glue ready cut in mahogany. On my current job I have ripped well over 200 ft of 3/4” flat sawed mahogany and still have 2 bars of battery. That being said the Makita is killer save one thing the slop adjusters need to be checked often especially on joined rails. I may pick up the tsc 55 if it’s got the power. 2 tracks saws are better than one, 1 adjusted to rip rail 1 adjusted to the cross cut rail.

3/4" probably is OK, but the original post indicated 1 1/2" ripping (or plunging 1 1/2" into a board thicker than that) which I think would likely put more stress on any motor if using a 48-tooth blade. I have ripped 3/4" hardwood with the TS55 and a 48-tooth blade, but wouldn't even think of trying 1 1/2" rips with that blade.
Randy

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #56 on: June 23, 2018, 02:29 AM »
It takes less than 60 seconds to change a blade on a TS-55.  Why not cut the best cut and cause the least wear on your tool?

https://www.instagram.com/p/BixH1v5nZvI/?hl=en&taken-by=festoolsedge

Peter

Devil's advocate.  Why spend the time and extra expense on another blade(s) to do the what the Makita 36V can do with stock blade?

Because it is cheaper than buying a Makita 36v?  Or because you already have a TS-55 and other blades?

Peter

Peter, I wouldn’t call the Makita 36 Volt cheaper by any means.  By the time you buy the saw, battery packs and track, the price is about the same as the more capable TS 75. 

I think people make too big of deal about the weight of the TS 75.  It’s only 3 1/4 pounds heavier than the TS 75.  The Makita blades don’t have matched Kerfs like the TS 75.  The Makita forces you to change strips with blades changes. 

I’m a bit puzzled why anyone would compare the TS 75 against the Makita.  The TS 75 can handle thicker hardwoods and a wider range of materials than the Makita 36 V.

To change blades on an existing TS-55 is cheaper than buying a Makita 36 v.

Online glass1

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #57 on: June 23, 2018, 07:12 AM »
I recently rehabbed 2 antique barn doors. 2” thick. Plenty of rip cuts. 48 tooth blade. No problem in southern yellow pine for Makita. Paid $399 with charger 4 batteries 2 Systainers and a rail. Only need the 48 tooth blade.

Offline Cheese

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #58 on: June 23, 2018, 09:45 AM »
TSC 55 with a 28T universal blade

White oak, 1 7/8" thick



Walnut, 1 3/4" thick

« Last Edit: June 23, 2018, 09:58 AM by Cheese »

Online glass1

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Re: TS 55 Reliability/Quality Problem
« Reply #59 on: June 23, 2018, 02:46 PM »
Cool  [big grin].  Nice