Author Topic: TS 55R EBQ  (Read 2847 times)

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Offline Bertie Bassett

  • Posts: 7
TS 55R EBQ
« on: January 05, 2018, 05:23 AM »
I’ve read so many good things about this plunge saw I think it’s time I invested in one, buy just how good is the cut?
For example, is the cut good enough to joint timber dir cult from cuttting or would I still have to use my jointer/planner?
Thanks
BB
Edit I will be using the saw with the track.

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Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2525
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2018, 08:35 AM »
It produces a great edge suitable for assembly.  No need to typically have to go to a jointer. 

Welcome to FOG!

Share your examples of work and I’m sure others will provide further details.  I do both casework and furniture and the TS saws work great for finished edges ready for glueup.

You CAN get burning or saw marks on some edges so don’t throw out the hand planes, but for joinery I think the edges are glue ready.

Offline Bertie Bassett

  • Posts: 7
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2018, 01:25 PM »
Thanks neilc

Offline SS Teach

  • Posts: 285
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2018, 02:09 PM »
Welcome to FOG. The standard blade that comes with the TS 55R is very good and leaves you with an incredibley smooth cut.
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Online Gregor

  • Posts: 1084
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2018, 04:47 AM »
If you want to directly joint timber (opposed to composit materials like mdf, plywood and such) you should do two cuts when going along the grain: one some mm out from your final target to relief any internal stress that might exist in the piece (which could lead to the workpiece twisting/bending after being separated), then the final one to get a straight edge where you actually want it.

For sheet goods (that as of their internal structure don't move when being sliced) the cut should be fine as-is for glueup.

Offline Bertie Bassett

  • Posts: 7
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2018, 07:53 AM »
Thanks SS Teach and Gregor, great tip too Gregor, in the past I’ve experienced problems with stresses in timber which caused me a lot of grief.

Offline demographic

  • Posts: 382
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2018, 12:10 PM »
The first post in THIS thread shows a good way of getting two bits of wood cut so they join up well.

Every once in a while theres a thread when someone complains that their saw isn't cutting perfectly to within a bleedin Angstrom unit* blah blah blah and they are this >< close to launching it into the nearest canal*.

This is a good way to minimise the problems they are experiencing.







*Some slight exaggeration may have been used in the making of this post.

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2515
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2018, 12:46 PM »
I use this all the time for perfect glue ups. For solid wood I recommend one of the other blades with fewer teeth. The standard blade is ideal for sheet goods.

Offline Bertie Bassett

  • Posts: 7
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2018, 08:03 AM »
Thanks to all who helped make up my mind. I’m pleased to say I’m now the proud owner of a TS 55.

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 5178
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2018, 10:00 AM »
I’ve read so many good things about this plunge saw I think it’s time I invested in one, buy just how good is the cut?
For example, is the cut good enough to joint timber dir cult from cuttting or would I still have to use my jointer/planner?

Hey @Bertie Bassett , this may answer your question. This is a piece of 5/4 walnut slab, 7' long that I picked up to make a kitchen countertop. I needed to rip a 7/8" wide strip off of the rear of the slab because this countertop will have to fit between 2 posts.

Tools used:
TSC 55 with the Festool 48 tooth 495377 blade
2 each 1400 guide rails joined together
No masking tape was used, I just placed the rail in position on the walnut and made the cut.

Photo 1 is the slab already cut but held together with 2 clamps. Can you locate the cut line?

Photo 2 is proof that the slab has indeed been cut into 2 pieces.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3600
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2018, 11:03 AM »
I think that answers the question.  Mic drop.

I’ve read so many good things about this plunge saw I think it’s time I invested in one, buy just how good is the cut?
For example, is the cut good enough to joint timber dir cult from cuttting or would I still have to use my jointer/planner?

Hey @Bertie Bassett , this may answer your question. This is a piece of 5/4 walnut slab, 7' long that I picked up to make a kitchen countertop. I needed to rip a 7/8" wide strip off of the rear of the slab because this countertop will have to fit between 2 posts.

Tools used:
TSC 55 with the Festool 48 tooth 495377 blade
2 each 1400 guide rails joined together
No masking tape was used, I just placed the rail in position on the walnut and made the cut.

Photo 1 is the slab already cut but held together with 2 clamps. Can you locate the cut line?

Photo 2 is proof that the slab has indeed been cut into 2 pieces.
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Offline rst

  • Posts: 2044
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2018, 11:19 AM »
Cheese...you da man!!   [big grin]

Offline SoonerFan

  • Posts: 416
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2018, 09:30 PM »
@Cheese a picture is worth a thousand words.  Your to pictures summed up the TS55 capabilities for joining very nicely/succinctly and in my opinion definitively.


Offline Bertie Bassett

  • Posts: 7
Re: TS 55R EBQ
« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2018, 08:07 AM »
One of these two joins were made with my new Festool TS55, the other was hand planed, can anyone spot which is which?
To say I’m well pleased with my latest tool is a massive understatement.
Thanks guys, your recommendations were spot on.
BB