Author Topic: Using 220v Festool in the US  (Read 2969 times)

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Offline Intex

  • Posts: 33
Using 220v Festool in the US
« on: July 07, 2018, 09:53 PM »
I finally was able to add a 220volt outlet in the garage to hookup the KS-60 Kapex miter saw

We ran to hot 110volt lines to the outlet, plus one ground. We hooked up one 120v hot to each horizontal female pin of a Nema 6-15 receptacle 15 amp. We hooked up the ground, to the ground connector on the Nema Receptacle, even though the saws plug won’t use it .

We cut off the UK 220v plug on the KS-60 and connected a NEMA 6-15 plug to it, one Brown wire to one horizontal pin, and the Blue wire to the other horizontal pin. No other connections.

The ks-60 works, although the motor sounds like it has a bad bearing, not a smooth sound, but since I have never heard a ks-60 before I have nothing to compare it to

Any comments on this????

And now I would like to thank Festool for making this purchase so easy for me, (sarcasm). I ended up spending much more than a KS-120 but I could not use the ks-120 because of its size and weight. Make things extremely hard for your customers and it probably will add to the goodwill formed up to that 5ime. (again more sarcasm) I am not a happy camper that they made this so difficult by forbidding their European dealers from selling 110v models for export

Hope this helps someone

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Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1557
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2018, 10:25 PM »
The ks-60 works, although the motor sounds like it has a bad bearing, not a smooth sound, but since I have never heard a ks-60 before I have nothing to compare it to
Is it growling sound like ts 55 or 75 make? But than ks60 has belt drive. Perhaps you could compare it to some videos.

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1067
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2018, 05:10 AM »
Make sure that the label on the Kapex lists the power requirements as 50-60Hz, else the electronics could expect 50Hz but with the mains being at 60Hz in the US it might get confused (in case it would, as the simplest solution to control the RPM, just count the RPM of the blade in the time between two zero crossings of the mains).
This could end your Kapex quickly as the electronics would constantly aim to run the motor 20% faster than intended.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2018, 06:52 AM »
Make sure that the label on the Kapex lists the power requirements as 50-60Hz, else the electronics could expect 50Hz but with the mains being at 60Hz in the US it might get confused (in case it would, as the simplest solution to control the RPM, just count the RPM of the blade in the time between two zero crossings of the mains).
This could end your Kapex quickly as the electronics would constantly aim to run the motor 20% faster than intended.

In his previous thread he clarified that the label did say 50-60 HZ.

Peter

Offline six-point socket II

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Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2018, 07:30 AM »
Then obviously I stand corrected, wow.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1067
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2018, 11:21 AM »
In his previous thread he clarified that the label did say 50-60 HZ.
Havn't seem that one. Nevermind then.

Offline Coen

  • Posts: 368
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2018, 11:05 PM »
And now I would like to thank Festool for making this purchase so easy for me, (sarcasm). I ended up spending much more than a KS-120 but I could not use the ks-120 because of its size and weight. Make things extremely hard for your customers and it probably will add to the goodwill formed up to that 5ime. (again more sarcasm) I am not a happy camper that they made this so difficult by forbidding their European dealers from selling 110v models for export

Hope this helps someone

Why would European dealers even sell 110V in the first place? Outside of the "UK building site" nobody uses 110V here.

It's all 230V here or locally some ancient 2x130V with 120 degrees shifted (=230)

Never seen split-phase here either. Either single phase 230V or 3x230V with 400V between the phases.

Wouldn't be surprised if the Kapex just rectifies everything, so frequency be damned. Especially when going to a higher frequency, as the caps in the rectifier get topped up more often (lower ripple).

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1557
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2018, 11:59 PM »
Why would European dealers even sell 110V in the first place? Outside of the "UK building site" nobody uses 110V here.
I guess the OP's frustration is of general nature. 40% of the global economy runs on 110V, a huge underutilized market for Festool.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2018, 12:03 AM by Svar »

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2673
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2018, 12:15 AM »
Why would European dealers even sell 110V in the first place? Outside of the "UK building site" nobody uses 110V here.
I guess the OP's frustration is of general nature. 40% of the global economy runs on 110V, a huge underutilized market for Festool.
@Svar

Where do you get that figure from?

If you look at this site, few 110V and, apart from Canada and  US, most are present or former US territories.

https://www.school-for-champions.com/science/ac_world_volt_freq_list.htm#.W0LgTdF_Wf0
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Offline Svar

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Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #9 on: July 09, 2018, 12:20 AM »
Why would European dealers even sell 110V in the first place? Outside of the "UK building site" nobody uses 110V here.
I guess the OP's frustration is of general nature. 40% of the global economy runs on 110V, a huge underutilized market for Festool.
@Svar
Where do you get that figure from?
If you look at this site, few 110V and, apart from Canada and  US, most are present or former US territories.
Most of S. Am. + N. America + Japan + Taiwan = 40% of global GDP.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2018, 12:36 AM by Svar »

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 214
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2018, 12:40 AM »
Why would European dealers even sell 110V in the first place? Outside of the "UK building site" nobody uses 110V here.
I guess the OP's frustration is of general nature. 40% of the global economy runs on 110V, a huge underutilized market for Festool.
@Svar
Where do you get that figure from?
If you look at this site, few 110V and, apart from Canada and  US, most are present or former US territories.
Most of S. Am. + N. America + Japan = 40% of global GDP.

On top of that, just the US/Canada/Japan makes for just 3 countries to have to work with to get that amount of economy, not dozens a few percent at a time.  And a further bonus, Japan is very far away yet uses the same electrical plugs at North America.

Still, as another poster mentioned, tools are going brushless, so even when corded they all will be just rectifying to DC.  Festool should be making all their tools. 100-240VAC 50/60hz,  rectify, and run brushless motors, and have that be the same spec as the battery powered tools so they can be both battery and corded in the same tool (like some other brands have done with some tools).  Make one design, ship it globally with just the regionalization cord tossed in the box. Now it's the same as other electronics have been for decades. Heck sell the tools without the cord, which would make sense in plug-it world.  Now you have one package for the entire planet, don't even have to tweak a thing.

Offline Alex

  • Posts: 5729
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2018, 01:25 AM »
  Festool should be making all their tools. 100-240VAC 50/60hz,  rectify, and run brushless motors, and have that be the same spec as the battery powered tools so they can be both battery and corded in the same tool (like some other brands have done with some tools).  Make one design, ship it globally with just the regionalization cord tossed in the box.

Totally impractical and often totally impossible.

Appliances that say 110-240v have an internal transformer with two selectable windings that lower the voltage. This can not be done for a powertool because they want to utilise the full power of the grid and don't even have a transformer.


Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1067
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2018, 08:39 AM »
And a further bonus, Japan is very far away yet uses the same electrical plugs at North America.
You realize that the world is a sphere, not a flat map that ends at the edges of a piece of paper?

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1557
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2018, 11:50 AM »
Festool should be making all their tools. 100-240VAC 50/60hz,  rectify, and run brushless motors, and have that be the same spec as the battery powered tools so they can be both battery and corded in the same tool (like some other brands have done with some tools).
They'd still need a transformer, right? Can a 1800W one be miniaturized enough to fit on-board?

Offline Coen

  • Posts: 368
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #14 on: July 09, 2018, 02:23 PM »
Here is a novel idea; we all switch to 350 Vdc (https://www.directcurrent.eu/en/) or the Americans just switch to 230Vac. If 40% of the world economy uses 230Vac (yeah, I was surprised too), it still means 60% uses 230Vac. Americans can run european tools on split-phase 110V (=220V), but Europeans can't run American tools without step-down transformer. So the Americans are leaving out massive export opportunities for themselves by sticking to a less efficient system that can't be exported easily.  [wink]

You might want to combine it with metrification  [tongue]

  Festool should be making all their tools. 100-240VAC 50/60hz,  rectify, and run brushless motors, and have that be the same spec as the battery powered tools so they can be both battery and corded in the same tool (like some other brands have done with some tools).  Make one design, ship it globally with just the regionalization cord tossed in the box.

Totally impractical and often totally impossible.

Appliances that say 110-240v have an internal transformer with two selectable windings that lower the voltage. This can not be done for a powertool because they want to utilise the full power of the grid and don't even have a transformer.

More likely they just change the switching duty cycle. But that's mostly the stuff with lower power.

And yes, I don't want any increased weight for my tools just to please someone on the other side of the globe.

We agreed globally on the same network connector (RJ-45), the same USB connectors, the same DVD size, the same wifi standard. If it were left to non-political engineers the other stuff would have already been harmonized.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2018, 02:31 PM by Coen »

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 214
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #15 on: July 09, 2018, 09:43 PM »
  Festool should be making all their tools. 100-240VAC 50/60hz,  rectify, and run brushless motors, and have that be the same spec as the battery powered tools so they can be both battery and corded in the same tool (like some other brands have done with some tools).  Make one design, ship it globally with just the regionalization cord tossed in the box.

Totally impractical and often totally impossible.

Appliances that say 110-240v have an internal transformer with two selectable windings that lower the voltage. This can not be done for a powertool because they want to utilise the full power of the grid and don't even have a transformer.

They can have internal transformers, and stuff that goes for cheap often does that.  But if your doing it in the modern world, you bring power in, rectify to DC, now you have DC power and can have a large range based on what came in. You then use a solid state DC-DC to PWM to what ever voltage you want the tool to run at, logical plan would to be set this at the same voltage as your battery system if you want the flexibility to use battery power.  Also if you make the tool flexible in this way, the recitfier and DC-DC is in a module that unplugs from the battery slot, so when on battery power, it's not there.  Then the motor has the same simple IGBT run the motor.  Nothing about this is big or complicated and really anymore not even expensive, thus why you see tools going this route.   You also see this on power supplies/bricks for laptops.  Some have huge heavy bricks, others have small little things.  The difference is ones that use transformers, and ones that run thru solid state.  The later cost a bit more, but makes for a supply that is way smaller and lighter.    Any tool with a brushless motor is this today, just a question of if they spec'd it all out to handle the full 100-240VAC range, or went with 2 setups for regionalization.

You are getting the same power from the wall no matter how you do it.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 214
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #16 on: July 09, 2018, 10:10 PM »
Here is a novel idea; we all switch to 350 Vdc (https://www.directcurrent.eu/en/) or the Americans just switch to 230Vac. If 40% of the world economy uses 230Vac (yeah, I was surprised too), it still means 60% uses 230Vac. Americans can run european tools on split-phase 110V (=220V), but Europeans can't run American tools without step-down transformer. So the Americans are leaving out massive export opportunities for themselves by sticking to a less efficient system that can't be exported easily.  [wink]

You might want to combine it with metrification  [tongue]

We agreed globally on the same network connector (RJ-45), the same USB connectors, the same DVD size, the same wifi standard. If it were left to non-political engineers the other stuff would have already been harmonized.

My understanding is there was a heavy look at getting rid of split phase in the US in the 50s, but they went with the classic reason for not change "too much stuff would have to change/be replaced/etc" so it didn't happen.   Also you get into passionate safety debates.  I won't pick a side on that issue, but some feel 220 is perfectly safe, other feel it's too dangerous.  All sides can make some solid arguments there.

I think the big part that gets overlooked is people tend to think the US is just 110, when it is 110/220.  Most forget there is 220-240V here because it only comes up as part of your house service, and large appliances that are rarely un-wired/un-plugged and when they are, it's often not the home owner doing it. So folks just don't think about this other voltage.  In putting stuff in a home, there aren't many things that come up that give you and option of 110 or 220 version.  Things like radiant floor heating are one of the few things that comes to mind that do.  Also a lot of stuff is already rated for 220V.  Things like light switches all ready come with 110/208/220V ratings on them, but few notice.   A person could very much wire up a house to be a 220V house.  But they aren't going to be able to get all the everyday durable goods they normally buy very easy, though many things are just a matter of a power cord swap.  I don't know how Europes grid evolved.  The US started (well, not started by first standardized) 110V, and then they realized they could double it up, and thus we got split phase.

Since people encounter 220V in their home so rarely, even though it's all around them, it just gets forgot. No one just has NEMA 6-15 plugs on the walls.  Also US electric code prohibits branch circuits on 220V, so every outlet needs a breaker, which becomes a major hang up for trying to push "give them plugs and the products will come".   I wire up plugs as 20A plugs.  I have yet in my life to find anything that actually took a 20Amp plug.  But the circuit gets the benefit anyway of having 33% more capacity than a normal 15Amp.    Sadly companies like Shop Vac will still advertise their vacuums as. 3.5hp and 6hp and all sorts of nonsense.  You're only getting 2.5hp out of that 15Amp outlet no matter what, and that's before the 85% derate drops you down to a 2.1hp plug.

You mention standards, the big difference is those where created in a post global world.  So from the start people were thinking common, and just adopting what the country of origin did.   Electric grids started long before the world worked that way.  And the cost of that change is real.   What will change is what you touched on.   Solar panels brought DC power back,  cheap battery systems further help, and now with so many of the things we use in homes being DC power internally,  there is a chance for DC to be the standard path.  If spec for home power/connectors actually happens for home DC (groups have been trying), then you could see homes having 1 large central AC to DC convertor where the service comes in.  So now it gets power by what ever that country uses, but the other end is global standard.   I think the best hope right now is that the telecom industry has standardized 400VDC to replace 48VDC in their systems.  Tesla is building their battery backup systems to the 400VDC spec, so now you have AC-DC controllers getting made to support this.  Still getting there is hard.  Automotive has shown this from failed attempts at 42VDC, some current 48VDC efforts.  But then when you get to the full EVs, pack voltages are all over the place.  SAE and others really haven't tried to standardize it.  Military has 600VDC for some applications MIL-SPEC

AC power simply will not get standardized outside of a post global war/destructive solar flare, type event. But DC power holds promise.   One all ready exist, but I don't think you can run a big saw on USB-C, gonna need a multi-port hub for that  [tongue]

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1067
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2018, 04:12 AM »
But DC power holds promise.
It also has downsides, like worse arcing behaviour (AC arcs extinguish quicker as of the frequent zero-crossing).

Offline Coen

  • Posts: 368
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2018, 10:33 PM »
[...]

In the Netherlands we swapped from 127V to 220V in the 1970's. First it was using two phases of 127V for a total of 220, later net voltage upped to 220 and residential boards rewired to use the neutral again. The first change could be done house by house, the 2nd change had to be done by whole neighborhoods at the same time. That same thing could be done in the US  [tongue]

Because of that history, electrical codes here (NL) still require switching the neutral. In most other countries they only require the hot to be switched, like Germany.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2018, 11:51 PM by Coen »

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 214
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2018, 12:21 AM »
I really don't know when we added 240 in the US and thus became split phase, but we started out 100-120V fairly early on like everyone else, we just never went full switch over.

There really is no push for it, and in general very few people care. It's not like the inch/metric situation where it has a major impact on folks every day, commerce issues, general headaches in doing things.  The power grid situation is really a small impact all around as things that should be on 220 all ready are (HVAC, dryers, welders, ovens, cooktops, water heaters, EV car charging).  It's the general purpose appliances that aren't, and there just isn't a compelling reason to change.  It's not like those items are pulling massive amounts of amps where going 220 would make a big difference.

The NEC (US electric code), would need to put an exception in to allow 15/20Amp branch circuits to be put into construction.  After that you'd still have the issue that no builder would put such circuits in without code requiring them too, and they would fit it to the end of the earth like everything else and they would have a good case since there would be no appliances to use them at the beginning.  So in this aspect you get a situation like the metric conversion.  Which happens first?   You would need to government to make a push for 240 only to happen, but then you still have a hard time for making the push.  Like metric which is all around us people don't notice, so is 220 around us people just don't notice. But unlike inch/metric it doesn't cause day to day problems for very many folks. 

I think you might find more people wishing they could get 3Phase into their house/garage long before they expressed desire to get rid of 110V.

Offline Coen

  • Posts: 368
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2018, 08:08 PM »
I really don't know when we added 240 in the US and thus became split phase, but we started out 100-120V fairly early on like everyone else, we just never went full switch over.

There really is no push for it, and in general very few people care. It's not like the inch/metric situation where it has a major impact on folks every day, commerce issues, general headaches in doing things.  The power grid situation is really a small impact all around as things that should be on 220 all ready are (HVAC, dryers, welders, ovens, cooktops, water heaters, EV car charging).  It's the general purpose appliances that aren't, and there just isn't a compelling reason to change.  It's not like those items are pulling massive amounts of amps where going 220 would make a big difference.

The NEC (US electric code), would need to put an exception in to allow 15/20Amp branch circuits to be put into construction.  After that you'd still have the issue that no builder would put such circuits in without code requiring them too, and they would fit it to the end of the earth like everything else and they would have a good case since there would be no appliances to use them at the beginning.  So in this aspect you get a situation like the metric conversion.  Which happens first?   You would need to government to make a push for 240 only to happen, but then you still have a hard time for making the push.  Like metric which is all around us people don't notice, so is 220 around us people just don't notice. But unlike inch/metric it doesn't cause day to day problems for very many folks. 

I think you might find more people wishing they could get 3Phase into their house/garage long before they expressed desire to get rid of 110V.

EV charging on 220V... how thick are you going to run that wire or how long are you willing to wait?

Offline Intex

  • Posts: 33
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #21 on: July 14, 2018, 01:37 PM »
When I was in grammer school, over 50 years ago, they asked us to start learning the metric system, since in the next year or two we would be converting.....
Just let Festool sell their 110V jobsite tools made for the UK here is all I ask.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 214
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #22 on: July 14, 2018, 06:45 PM »

There really is no push for it, and in general very few people care. It's not like the inch/metric situation where it has a major impact on folks every day, commerce issues, general headaches in doing things.  The power grid situation is really a small impact all around as things that should be on 220 all ready are (HVAC, dryers, welders, ovens, cooktops, water heaters, EV car charging).  It's the general purpose appliances that aren't, and there just isn't a compelling reason to change.  It's not like those items are pulling massive amounts of amps where going 220 would make a big difference.


EV charging on 220V... how thick are you going to run that wire or how long are you willing to wait?

I mentioned EV car chargers.  Those are 220V.  Most run a NEMA 14-50 or 14-60 Plug.  Same plug used on welders and dryers and other items.  Some places now mandate garages have one of these plugs in the garage on new construction/remodels so it's there.

It's not that we don't have 220V, houses use it extensively, just not on general branch circuits (stuff we randomly plug into).

If you were thinking 220V isn't enough to charge a car, it's fine.  While not in use right now, the 220V AC based chargers can go up to 100Amps,  so 22kw,  which means a 90kwh Tesla can full charge on that in just over 4 hours, which is far less time than most folks sleep.   I don't think any country is running more than 240V into homes, so the US doesn't have an issue there.  And also you just get bigger amperage services.  I took mine from the lame 100A, to 200A normal service, but plenty of houses have 400A services (just 2 200A panels).  Wire is a none issue for one plug in a garage.   I don't see anyone installing DC fast chargers in their garage (unless maybe they have a battery bank as part of their house), since their is no reason for fast charging at homes, that's for long distance travel, and thats where you stop at "charge stations" along the way where they can charge a car in 30 mins or less.

Offline demographic

  • Posts: 382
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #23 on: July 15, 2018, 10:19 AM »
When I was in grammer school, over 50 years ago, they asked us to start learning the metric system, since in the next year or two we would be converting.....
Just let Festool sell their 110V jobsite tools made for the UK here is all I ask.

I wouldn't hold your breath, try getting hold of a 110 volt charger From Festool over here, common in the US (or close enough) but like rocking horse poo over here. Lot handier for charging batteries as it doesn't involve a long walk down to the site office to charge up

I have a US spec charger for my De-Walt batteries, works a treat but Festool don't seem able to comprehend people buying other spec tools because its sometimes handier for the end user.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 214
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #24 on: July 15, 2018, 11:07 AM »
Just let Festool sell their 110V jobsite tools made for the UK here is all I ask.

I wouldn't hold your breath, try getting hold of a 110 volt charger From Festool over here, common in the US (or close enough) but like rocking horse poo over here. Lot handier for charging batteries as it doesn't involve a long walk down to the site office to charge up

I have a US spec charger for my De-Walt batteries, works a treat but Festool don't seem able to comprehend people buying other spec tools because its sometimes handier for the end user.

He wasn't asking about cordless, just corded tools.   Are you saying Festool doesn't offer the charger for battery powered tools in the UK that is a 110/120V version?  I can sorta see that as my understanding is the 110V UK job site deal is all about the cords, if folks ran all battery tools it would be a non issue.

Random curiosity, what plug do UK job site tools run?  Is it something special to the UK, or do you use a US spec plug. Based on you saying you have a US Dewalt charger, I'm assuming you use the US plug otherwise you would have to alter the cord and now your right back into a different job site violation (also assuming UK like the US says modified/DIY cords are a job site no no).

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 633
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #25 on: July 15, 2018, 02:50 PM »
Just let Festool sell their 110V jobsite tools made for the UK here is all I ask.

I wouldn't hold your breath, try getting hold of a 110 volt charger From Festool over here, common in the US (or close enough) but like rocking horse poo over here. Lot handier for charging batteries as it doesn't involve a long walk down to the site office to charge up

I have a US spec charger for my De-Walt batteries, works a treat but Festool don't seem able to comprehend people buying other spec tools because its sometimes handier for the end user.

He wasn't asking about cordless, just corded tools.   Are you saying Festool doesn't offer the charger for battery powered tools in the UK that is a 110/120V version?  I can sorta see that as my understanding is the 110V UK job site deal is all about the cords, if folks ran all battery tools it would be a non issue.

Random curiosity, what plug do UK job site tools run?  Is it something special to the UK, or do you use a US spec plug. Based on you saying you have a US Dewalt charger, I'm assuming you use the US plug otherwise you would have to alter the cord and now your right back into a different job site violation (also assuming UK like the US says modified/DIY cords are a job site no no).

I believe they use a 220V step-down transformer with multiple 110V outlets. Kind of a fancy power strip. Their outlets and plugs are not like is used in the US. They are round and have a hole/pin for ground but it is only used for alignment. The plug and socket lock together. Photos attached.

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 633
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2018, 02:55 PM »
When I was in grammer school, over 50 years ago, they asked us to start learning the metric system, since in the next year or two we would be converting.....
Just let Festool sell their 110V jobsite tools made for the UK here is all I ask.

They already are sold in the US with the difference being the cord.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1557
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #27 on: July 15, 2018, 03:18 PM »
They already are sold in the US with the difference being the cord.
The replacement part numbers of 110V electrical bits (rotor, etc.) are different in US and UK. Whether they are actually different I don't know.
What does the motor plate says on UK tools? 110V 50Hz?

Offline demographic

  • Posts: 382
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #28 on: July 15, 2018, 04:59 PM »
He wasn't asking about cordless, just corded tools.   Are you saying Festool doesn't offer the charger for battery powered tools in the UK that is a 110/120V version?  I can sorta see that as my understanding is the 110V UK job site deal is all about the cords, if folks ran all battery tools it would be a non issue.

Random curiosity, what plug do UK job site tools run?  Is it something special to the UK, or do you use a US spec plug. Based on you saying you have a US Dewalt charger, I'm assuming you use the US plug otherwise you would have to alter the cord and now your right back into a different job site violation (also assuming UK like the US says modified/DIY cords are a job site no no).

I can buy a 230 nominal (or thereabouts) voltage battery charger, which is handy for charging in houses and so on but the problems come when I'm on a large site where they only have 110 volt leads, and all the live 230 volt sockets are a fair walk away in the site office. This is a waste of time for me.
Also I much prefer having my batteries and chargers close to where I'm working as theft can be a real problem.
Admittedly not so much for Festool tools as there's not many on sites so less people need the batteries to power a bleedin radio or whatever.
Realistically I like having both voltage chargers as it gives me more choice.

As for the US change to UK site plugs, yeah they need to be changed over but they have to be PAT tested every few months on site anyway and have to have a certification sticker showing compliance.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 214
Re: Using 220v Festool in the US
« Reply #29 on: July 15, 2018, 05:33 PM »
Picturing UK contractors having their work trucks filled with batteries.  Mid day head to the truck for lunch and take a Scruge McDuck style swim in the back in the vast stash of batteries filling the truck to the seams.

Someplace there is a bad/flawed/failed business model of a Courier taking flights back and forth from JFK to Heathrow,  moving NAINA 110V tools westward and 120V chargers eastward.  Just needs enough volume to turn a profit  [tongue]