Author Topic: Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects  (Read 807 times)

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Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 126
Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects
« on: October 11, 2017, 02:13 PM »
Can you use Sippo dominos for indoor projects?  Is there a potential drawbacks to using Sippo dominos on indoor projects? (Expansion issues, ect)

For me it’s not an issue of price.  I work out of the family garage and storage space is at a premium.  I wanted to see if Sippo can be used for indoor projects too so I won’t have to make space on the shelves for both beech and Sippo domino systainers.

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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2017, 03:06 PM »
Yes you can.   Cost is the biggest drawback.

Peter
Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline Birdhunter

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Re: Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2017, 03:39 PM »
I did a large scale project building a number of outdoor benches and used Sipo tenons. I found buying the Sipo stock and cutting the tenons to length cut the cost dramatically. I did have to chamfer the ends so I traded off my time for  lower cost. I would not hesitate to use Sipo tenons for an indoor project.
Birdhunter

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Re: Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2017, 03:55 PM »
If space is at a premium, skip the systainers for the Dominos. You'll want to keep them sealed up in bags to fight humidity and swelling anyway.

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 126
Re: Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2017, 04:31 PM »
If space is at a premium, skip the systainers for the Dominos. You'll want to keep them sealed up in bags to fight humidity and swelling anyway.

I was thinking of building my own containers using a router table to make a Dado and box joint box.  This would have room for bags and all the domino sizes in one storage box vs the Festool concept of buying 3-4 different systainers for dominos. 

I don’t know if it really makes sense for a home user to buy and store that many dominos.  Having a large supply of dominos you don’t use for a long time would probably be a waste.

Offline Trosey

  • Posts: 80
Re: Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2017, 10:23 PM »
I M O,

The best buy in the Festool 1917  catalog is on page 117.

Sipo stock

8 mm x 750 mm 

part# 498690

$110.00

That computes to 20 cents each for a single 8 x 50 domino (Sipo).

Compare to buying part # 494941 for one hundred 8 x 50 (Beech) dominoes at a cost of 24 cents each. No-brainer to me.

I do not stock any "beech" 8 mm dominoes for the 500 or 700. Everything in 8mm   Sipo in 750mm ....just one length. Inside and outside is covered by one skew.

From 30 mm to 100 mm. 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100.

How do I stow them...chopped in half (373 mm) and pitched in an old classic systainer...I guess I could put them in a kitchen trash bag  before I put them in the systainer.

But i could really get anal and put some of the little blue tablets(desicant) in the bag and swap them out when they turn pink and then put the systainer in another plastic bag.

HTH

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 126
Re: Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2017, 12:27 PM »
I M O,

The best buy in the Festool 1917  catalog is on page 117.

Sipo stock

8 mm x 750 mm 

part# 498690

$110.00

That computes to 20 cents each for a single 8 x 50 domino (Sipo).

Compare to buying part # 494941 for one hundred 8 x 50 (Beech) dominoes at a cost of 24 cents each. No-brainer to me.

I do not stock any "beech" 8 mm dominoes for the 500 or 700. Everything in 8mm   Sipo in 750mm ....just one length. Inside and outside is covered by one skew.

From 30 mm to 100 mm. 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100.

How do I stow them...chopped in half (373 mm) and pitched in an old classic systainer...I guess I could put them in a kitchen trash bag  before I put them in the systainer.

But i could really get anal and put some of the little blue tablets(desicant) in the bag and swap them out when they turn pink and then put the systainer in another plastic bag.

HTH

I’d also have to do some homework to see if there’s any reason if the Sippo stock would have any expansion issues with some hardwoods. 

Ex. Maple is not good choice for tight fitting drawers because of expansion issues with Sugar Maple.

Offline Trosey

  • Posts: 80
Re: Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2017, 03:08 PM »
Young man,

For a very recent poster(forum member), you seem to be very knowledge on tools and woodworking. Some thoughts on wood movement is that mahogany is much more stable than beech. If that is so, then the sipo loose tenons is the way to go at the current price point and less number of skews that one has to carry in inventory(see above).

 Getting back to sanders. I own and have used both Mirka and Festool sanders.

I can BS with the big boys. You and " homeless from down under under" appear to be be trying to "double clutch" this great forum.

I can read and comprehend y'alls  banter back and forth. One poster or two posters, I do not know.  But BS's is not y'alls strong suit.

I will try to help others on this forum, but I take offense when "yanking chains and stirring the pot" is the motive. I will call BS.

Y'alls posts are time dated and it is easy to for one to do a DNA on the true facts.

HTH

Offline Trosey

  • Posts: 80
Re: Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2017, 03:12 PM »
"Come back good buddy." [wink]

Offline Steven Owen

  • Posts: 126
Re: Using Sippo Domino’s for indoor projects
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2017, 04:19 PM »
Young man,

For a very recent poster(forum member), you seem to be very knowledge on tools and woodworking. Some thoughts on wood movement is that mahogany is much more stable than beech. If that is so, then the sipo loose tenons is the way to go at the current price point and less number of skews that one has to carry in inventory(see above).

 Getting back to sanders. I own and have used both Mirka and Festool sanders.

I can BS with the big boys. You and " homeless from down under under" appear to be be trying to "double clutch" this great forum.

I can read and comprehend y'alls  banter back and forth. One poster or two posters, I do not know.  But BS's is not y'alls strong suit.

I will try to help others on this forum, but I take offense when "yanking chains and stirring the pot" is the motive. I will call BS.

Y'alls posts are time dated and it is easy to for one to do a DNA on the true facts.

HTH

I think you’re confusing things here.  There’s a lot information overload on the web.  The discussion on the EC is simply about trying to clarify the content posted in a lot of reviews and videos on the web that directly compare the Deros and Festool EC sanders.  I’m trying to sort out good info from bad info in various comparisons between the two sanders.

The only conclusion you can draw is both sanders are equal good.  Niether really has the clear advantage over the other.

Thanks for your feedback on the Sippo.  I was 99% sure the Sippo would be good in both applications.  I wanted to hear feedback from other users.  Personally I’d rather just stock one wood type versus having to stock both Sippo and Beech.  There’s nothing economical about buying things twice.