Author Topic: What if Festool got into "Mono-Brand-Stores" and selling online - directly.  (Read 2876 times)

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Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

It's an idea that has been floating in my head for quite some time now. And it got triggered again by two things: Festool Sedge's current video and my recent visit to my local Hilti store.

The "Mono-Brand-Stores" (or Boutiques) and direct online sales (from the manufacturer) have been around for quite some time now, especially in the luxury (accessories) sector/market. There are brands that do it like forever, and then there are some who hopped on the train only some years ago. I admit, I'm an admirer of Jean-Claude Biver and his knowledge, unconventional-innovational ideas, understanding of the (this) market and overall approach to life and business. But that's a whole different sector/market - I just wanted to hint where I'm coming from, idea wise. And currently, he strongly urges "specialization" for multi-brand dealers in this market in order to being able to compete with mono-brand boutiques and direct online selling.

So a couple of days ago I was at my local Hilti Center again, to pick up some small items. Normally I would order these online but I guess no one can blame me, I like the shopping experience there. I was close by anyway.

What I love about it is the whole experience, from the buildings design/"architecture", display of almost all tools and accessories - and of course the large amount of Hilti's own consumables. The possibility of testing products on the spot and very friendly and helpful staff.

Upon entering the first question was not: "How may I help you?" or what I was looking for - it was if I wanted a coffee or glass of water. (Yeah, first page of the seller's textbook, I know ... But it works.)

I didn't want to occupy the sales assistants as I was shopping for some small items only, anyway - so I declined and said I just wanted to window shop for a bit and pick up some small items upon leaving. So I went on my way through the isles, looking at different consumables picking up ideas/solutions for further projects. When I stopped at their new very small battery powered vacuum someone immediately gave me a small introduction to it, as they had it sitting there, ready for use.

Now, I've said it before and I say it again - most of the Festool dealer's in my area are way, way and far above average and do a great job. But who can blame them for not heaving everything at hand/ in stock and focussing on their customer base when selecting what they display/sell. Add the roadshow which greatly makes up for it and is awesome - but it's only once a year and depending on location it has to deal with many visitors so time is limited - at least it feels that way.

Then, seeing how much fun people like Sedge (and I hope many other too, at Festool) have, giving tips, working with the tools and educating - imagine meeting someone like him at a Festool "Mono-Brand-Store". It wouldn't be down to just buying a tool, consumable or plain window shopping - but you're leaving with a handful of great tipps and tricks that actually help you.

I mean, take the current video - which is totally awesome by the way - https://www.instagram.com/p/Bi7JlvcHXss/?taken-by=festoolsedge - How many dealer's could offer this tip right now, how long would it take someone to figure this out on his/her own?

And then, if such a store is operated/funded by Festool itself, you're paying for it with every Festool purchase - no matter where. Which takes away (for me) the awry feeling of taking advantage of "someone" ...

I could totally see this. A cool place, partly visible wooden structure, partly "industrial" steel/rivets visible, sheet metal in Festool Blue ... All tools, testing area, walls full of accessories, true experts who love what they do and offer their real-world advise, a TV or two with Sedge's tipps/tricks/hacks looping ...

I'd love that. I'm allowed to dream - right? And I also admit, I'm simple like that  [eek] [tongue] ;) [big grin]

Anyone else feeling the love for a Festool owned "Mono-Brand-Store"?

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

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Offline TinyShop

  • Posts: 182
Thought provoking idea! That said, brick & mortar stores are largely going the way of the dinosaur with online sales increasingly dominating the retail landscape. This is due to the fact that they are incredibly expensive to operate (especially when compared to only wholesaling and/or operating digital stores). I really have to wonder how Hilti is able to make the economics work, though I bet it has something to do with more and more of their tools being produced in China (amazing how paying workers practically nothing and looking the other way in terms of environmental destruction frees up the bottom line). If Festool wants to avoid the race to the bottom they'll stick with wholesaling while possibly considering pursuing the direct-to-consumer model.

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5242
  • Does Anyone Know What Time It Is?
Good Idea Oliver.

But here is the states I dontknow if its practical. I can say that some dealers such as Anderson Plywood have a complete festool shop set up. So if I need to learn how to do something Don who is plain awesome will take his time and show you how to do something. recently when I bought the Undulating head for my planer, I asked him if their was a method to using the head. He took a out 850 planer and showed me some pointers on useing it. Another time and more recent I needed some rustic Hickory Plywood. They were the only ones I found that had it since they got it on a special deal it was a very good price.

So I stopped by to get some (1 hour drive each way) and got to talking with Don. Im making some legs for this bed set Im building (photos to come) and wanted to know how to use the domino to join  45s together. He cut some scrap took a domino 500 and explained and showed me how to set up the domino to make the cut.

So what Im trying to say is I may not get a cup of coffee. But we do have dealers who are set up to give us tips etc.

Thats last trip is when I saw the connector set up close and personal. Wow its nice. Almost bought one right then and there. Sure could of used it for this bedroom set Im building.

I got another one to build so maybe Ill get the set and use it on that one.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2339
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
I buy my Festool products from Highland Woodworking in Atlanta, Ga. The staff is very knowledgeable and friendly.

It is very seldom that I shop there simply for a Festool product. I usually have a shopping list of tools or supplies.

A "Festool only" store would not be ideal for me. I get the expert advice I need on everything from tools to finishes.
Birdhunter

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Thank's for the replies so far! :)

One thing for clarification, please don't get caught up in the coffe/water thing or tipps/tricks/advise in general too much, I know that there are dealers who can and will offer that.

My personal focus is clearly on the full range of tools and accessories. So if in the US (or anywhere else for that matter) dealers stock all of the available stuff - that's very cool. It's rather seldom here. What do I mean by that: I've made it a habit to call and check for availability before I drive anywhere, because more often than not, I learned the hard way and finally had to drive to 3 dealers to get what I wanted.

So this is basically my key point if you want: I would love a store where I can get any and everything readily available of the shelf from a single brand. And staff that is focussed on this one manufacturer, rather than on 3, 4 or 5 different ones.

There are so many sources with experts for everything else around here, but the tools and accessories seem to come short.

At least that's my impression. If I wanted some advise on a paint, wax or oil - no problem. But when trying to talk tools in the same location it's like: I can look that up in the catalog for you. I don't blame them at all, but that's why I would prefer to buy from a more tool focussed source/location.

Maybe makes my thoughts more tangible?

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: May 18, 2018, 05:42 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 4953
So Oliver, you’re proposing the Festool equivalent of an Apple store. An interesting thought.  [scratch chin]

Now, if only Biver would change brands. [popcorn]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
While I hadn't thought of Apple, but yeah same recipe.

Speaking of Biver, he is the type of man who can (could) make it work - absolutely. I'd bet my last shirt. Foremost because he would sit down with true enthusiasts to catch the fire and carry it on - among many other things.  [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline McNally Family

  • Posts: 614
  • Festool Atomic Phaser Particle Blaster (APPB Set)
While I hadn't thought of Apple, but yeah same recipe.

Speaking of Biver, he is the type of man who can (could) make it work - absolutely. I'd bet my last shirt. Foremost because he would sit down with true enthusiasts to catch the fire and carry it on - among many other things.  [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver


It could work, but only after the ongoing debate regarding online sales tax play's out.  I doubt even Festool could compete against out of state online dealer sales operations, as long as they don't charge sales tax.   When you are selling expensive items, the sales tax adds up fast.   

 
GREEN: In order of purchase = | CT26  |  RS 2 E | Hose w/ Sleeve 3.5m | 115mm X 226mm Hand Sanding Block | 80mm X 133mm Hand Sanding Block | HSK D21.5 5m hose | CT Boom Arm Bundle Set | 1080 Plate for custom MFT | OF 1400 EQ Router (metric) w/accessories | SYS-Rock BR10 | Cordless Sander RTSC 400 Set |  Cordless Delta Sander DTSC 400 Basic | Linear Sander LS 130 | PDC 18/4 set | CXS  2.6Ah Set | Installer Cleaning Set (2018 version) |  New style Festool hose D 27/32 x 3,5m AS/CT | Replacement Hose Garage | Remote control CT-F I/M-Set | MFH1000 work stool | Next purchase: TBD

RED: // Mafell P1cc  //  MT55cc  // Next purchase: TBD

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2339
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
I’m not sure I’d go to a Festool only store when my current store offers everything Festool plus just about everything else Woodworking.
Birdhunter

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5242
  • Does Anyone Know What Time It Is?
When I go to Anderson they are not a festool only store. however they have everything Ive needed in stock so far. It is hard to find a festool only store that is brick in mortar.

Now in the UK Toucan tools though not a festool only store, had about every festool known to man. I saw stuff I didnt know festool had, box cutters for example all the little things I never expected

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 737
Anderson is a very good example of what I would call the ideal. I high end store with knowledgeable staff and a pleasant atmosphere. I am in there all the time and Don is a wonderful resource. I do not think that a single brand store is particularly efficient hence financially viable. It would place the single brand store in direct competition with mail order  and that for various reasons is a difficult proposition. however Festool would be well served by looking for opportunities Like Anderson Plywood. They have seminars, and specialty days which are fantastic. For example this weekend they will have the Old tool swap meet. A tremendous event and they bring out the festool for demonstration. Just my cents.

Offline Midnight Man

  • Posts: 49
This is an interesting discussion to read.

I'm based in Australia, and the first thought in my head was "But Festool already sell direct to consumer" - then I realised, this is possibly something in Australia only.

Our local Festool site (www.festool.com.au) offers any tool, and any consumable, to be purchased direct.  If I recall correctly, delivery is subsidised or removed depending on purchase amount.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2339
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Apple stores sell lots of non-Apple items.
Birdhunter

Offline McNally Family

  • Posts: 614
  • Festool Atomic Phaser Particle Blaster (APPB Set)
Apple stores sell lots of non-Apple items.

@Birdhunter

A visit to  Highland Woodworking in Atlanta, Ga., is on my bucket list. 
GREEN: In order of purchase = | CT26  |  RS 2 E | Hose w/ Sleeve 3.5m | 115mm X 226mm Hand Sanding Block | 80mm X 133mm Hand Sanding Block | HSK D21.5 5m hose | CT Boom Arm Bundle Set | 1080 Plate for custom MFT | OF 1400 EQ Router (metric) w/accessories | SYS-Rock BR10 | Cordless Sander RTSC 400 Set |  Cordless Delta Sander DTSC 400 Basic | Linear Sander LS 130 | PDC 18/4 set | CXS  2.6Ah Set | Installer Cleaning Set (2018 version) |  New style Festool hose D 27/32 x 3,5m AS/CT | Replacement Hose Garage | Remote control CT-F I/M-Set | MFH1000 work stool | Next purchase: TBD

RED: // Mafell P1cc  //  MT55cc  // Next purchase: TBD

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2197
Apple stores sell lots of non-Apple items.

@Birdhunter

A visit to  Highland Woodworking in Atlanta, Ga., is on my bucket list.
. Me too, and I’m in Atlanta every once in a while for training classes.... I just need to rent a car and get it done while I’m there...
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline rst

  • Posts: 1973
My local Sherman Williams has put up Festool displays but has told me that only one store per district will be stocking.  My closest stocking dealer is 45 minutes away in Williamsport, Pa.  Hermance has been at machinery seller and manufacturer since the initial logging days in the 1800's.  They stock most items and have a large display and customer try out area.

Offline Rip Van Winkle

  • Posts: 301
This is an interesting discussion to read.

I'm based in Australia, and the first thought in my head was "But Festool already sell direct to consumer" - then I realised, this is possibly something in Australia only.

Our local Festool site (www.festool.com.au) offers any tool, and any consumable, to be purchased direct.  If I recall correctly, delivery is subsidised or removed depending on purchase amount.

Festool used to sell directly to consumers in the USA. I forget exactly when they started selling somewhat thru dealers. I think it might have been 2000, give or take. Woodcraft in the USA was the first chain I’m aware of that carried the Festool tools, although there were some other independant dealers before then. According to the salesman at my sort of local Woodcraft, Festool was trying to build up a network of dealers at the time, and encourage them to carry as full a line of tools and stock as possible, rather than order the tools in for customers.

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 610
Festool used to sell directly to consumers in the USA. I forget exactly when they started selling somewhat thru dealers. I think it might have been 2000, give or take. Woodcraft in the USA was the first chain I’m aware of that carried the Festool tools, although there were some other independant dealers before then. According to the salesman at my sort of local Woodcraft, Festool was trying to build up a network of dealers at the time, and encourage them to carry as full a line of tools and stock as possible, rather than order the tools in for customers.

It was later than 2000, maybe like 2006 or so. Early on (2001 or so) McFeely's carried them and you could buy on the Festool site. I also had a local dealer who carried a decent number of their tools. As soon as I found the Festool website I switched to ordering from there. At some point the site let you select your local retailer and I believe they received some type of credit for it.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 166
They could, and maybe should.  Most companies have caught on that the future is direct sales.

The Apple model is the future.  You make the product, you sell it online (where people can also get customization, special order models), you also have retail stores where you sell most of your products and inventory standard configurations of products.  Further you still have 3rd party retailers. No matter where you buy it, the price is the same.   Over the last 20 years, this is the trend as this is what people want. People don't want intermediates.  If you make something, sell it to people.  One of the main reasons internet sales took off was being able to buy what you wanted when you couldn't get it where you lived or those who sold it where charging a ridiculous price.

To those who comment on Brick and Mortars. It's not true they are dying, what is dying are ones that are not compatible with the newer way of doing things.  Best Buy (an electronics store chain in the US) isn't doing bad because of the internet, they are doing bad because people much rather just go to an Apple, Microsoft, Sony store and buy it there.  Or look at Toy's R Us, they didn't fail because of internet, they failed as small independent toy stories selling higher quality or more specialized toys have boomed.  The big box model is fine for a grocery store or something like Home Depot or Lowes.  Those make no sense for online sales, and what they sell is bulk generic stuff, and the products sold are not items that support themselves on their own.  Grip-rite isn't going to open a store at the mall selling nails.

Festool has enough products that opening "Festool Hut" could work. But they would only be a few places in the country that would be able to keep one of these open.  The reality is Festool is a name known by almost no one.  Not many people in construction trades have heard of them and you can find plenty of people that do a lot of woodworking that have never heard of them.  A straight up Festool store might get their name more well known, but still, it is a matter of how much market there is.  Festool is much like Canon, Nikon, Sony when it comes to cameras.  While you would buy their base models almost anyplace, just like you can buy any random brand circular saw and such anyplace once you get into the high end, there is a limited amount of buyers in any one place.  Festool and other similar brands are going to be like opening up a Store that only sells Nikon DSLR gear.  Sure, Nikon sells a lot of it, but there isn't a concentration high enough of buyers in any one place to justify a Nikon only store.  Just like high end cameras which are designed for Pro's but most sales are to hobbiest, Festool is the same way, they built/targeted to Pros, but are mainly bought by Hobbiest woodworkers and some speciality finish carpentry/cabinetry folks.

Finding a concentration of people that also has that many woodworkers buying tools all the time would be hard.  Thus Festool being a corner at specialized tool stores is more likely.  But direct sales online would be a great answer for sales of tools that will be low volume sellers that no retailer wants to carry as they know it will be largely a white elephant in their store. Possibly the answer to get NAINA tools into NA.

Biggest thing that would be nice with a Festool physical store would be if they were a weekend operation. The few place I know of that sell Festool have the classic problem that killed retail. They are open M-F, 9-5. Thus meaning their target buyers have to leave work to go check out a tool.  Or maybe they have a short Saturday morning window of being open.  Doesn't really work for people who are considering buying something.  You allow people to check stuff out in the evening or weekend it helps a lot.  You allow people to just wander around and look at stuff without pestering them, it goes a long way to people buying something.  It's a hard sell if someone can only get in the store during lunch and when they do the staff jumps them the minute they hit the door and then pesters them continualy.

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2339
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Highland Woodworking has a large area dedicated to Festool. I can buy Festool products and supplies, hand saws, chisels, glue, sandpaper, etc with one trip.

Additionally, a Festool Boutique is a tad too la de dah for most woodworkers I know.
Birdhunter

Offline mcooley

  • Posts: 211
One thing which has never been clear to me is where Festool's market is headed. I enjoy the tools mostly. But annual price hikes seem extremely reliant on remaining a boutique company. I could see them come out with a line that is cheaper and maybe that would make sense having two tiers to choose from. This is a simple example but look at the new 500 domino tenons for the new connector system and ask yourself why are those assortments priced so much lower than the other standard sizes? It seems to me they have some ironing out to do if they are to break into the contractor market or more general wood working markets. I think when the Pro sander was offered at $90 it got many of us thinking why not incorporate this in some meaningful way into the brand and not simply as a promotional strategy?

I believe the entire company has 20 engineers and only 2 designers. That tells you something about how they are organized and what oversights and limitations might be built into that type of corporate structure.

 

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2197
My local Sherman Williams has put up Festool displays but has told me that only one store per district will be stocking.  My closest stocking dealer is 45 minutes away in Williamsport, Pa.  Hermance has been at machinery seller and manufacturer since the initial logging days in the 1800's.  They stock most items and have a large display and customer try out area.
. And Paint Stores that participate  will be through Festool Paint division from what I’m told. So, narrow focus of Festool products will be stocked or ordered, Sanders, Vacs, and almost exclusively Granat Abrasives stocked or displayed. Accessories seem to be Nozzles and Vac Attachments or Pads for the Sanders from what I’ve seen.
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Jim_in_PA

  • Posts: 37
I honestly don't believe that the realistic economics of establishing "factory" stores will meet normal business planning metrics. It's hard enough for even general woodworking brick and mortar stores to stay in business with reasonable profits these days and folks are not going to travel long distances to go to them for the most part. I could see a few additional locations beyond their national facility in the US for more visible presence, training and other things, but a major network of stores I don't see happening. I don't envision them selling direct online, either. That would also undermine the many Festool dealers/partners who have really stepped up and established both full stocking and well appointed displays/demonstration areas within their footprints. Many Festool dealers, who do not have retail locations, still maintain a very high level of stocking, customer service and other considerations. My Festool Pusher (you know who you are, um...Bob) :) has been to my shop multiple times, loaned me tools to, um...try...and even held a demonstration day for friends in my shop a number of years ago. No other brand and representative of a brand has gone that far for me at any time since I've been enjoying woodworking for over 20 years.
----
ETS 150/3, Rotex 150, OF1010, OF1400, Trion PS 300, TDK-12, CT-22, MFT 1080, TS55, Domino XL DF 700, 8' track, (2) 55" tracks

SCM MiniMax S315WS, FS350, MM16, Camaster Stinger II SR-44 CNC

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 166
One thing which has never been clear to me is where Festool's market is headed. I enjoy the tools mostly. But annual price hikes seem extremely reliant on remaining a boutique company. I could see them come out with a line that is cheaper and maybe that would make sense having two tiers to choose from. This is a simple example but look at the new 500 domino tenons for the new connector system and ask yourself why are those assortments priced so much lower than the other standard sizes? It seems to me they have some ironing out to do if they are to break into the contractor market or more general wood working markets. I think when the Pro sander was offered at $90 it got many of us thinking why not incorporate this in some meaningful way into the brand and not simply as a promotional strategy?

I believe the entire company has 20 engineers and only 2 designers. That tells you something about how they are organized and what oversights and limitations might be built into that type of corporate structure.

If we stick to the Apple Store/sales analogy this would be doomed to fail. The reason Apple did so well over a 20 year run is they ditched the cheap stuff and decided to focus what they make. It was expensive, but when compared to closes things on spec, it was priced pretty well in general.  Making cheaper (price) products just hurts any company.  If people buy it at the price, then there is no reason to change the price point.  Really Festools issues are not price, I'd say most of their stuff makes sense for what you are getting.  You don't want them to start going crazy on cost cutting, this is what leads to other companies demises, they chase getting cost out, so the quality goes down, they start outsourcing, they start manufacturing in lower wage and such countries, which then means less in-country jobs.  Before long you have products that only cost a bit less, but are poorly made, il-thought out just so it hits the price point the big box store demands, and then people still buy the tool next to it on the shelf that was 5 dollars less.

The problem is more that "plan".  I don't think you will see any large scale adoption on job sites. Few people have heard of Festool.  Maybe they watched a home improvement show and noticed a weird tool in the background and caught the name on the side, but not much more than this.   With an incomplete line of tools in N.A. compared to their global assortment of stuff, it makes it hard for someone to want to buy in.  "Hey I can get this neat router table system that I can swap tools out for....oh wait, it's modular with just one module...".  The inch/imperial change over also complicates it more, and probably increases that NAINA problem even more.  As I mentioned in a different thread, I discovered Festool a couple years ago and started plotting buying a bunch of stuff.  But with the removal of metric tools, and then the continual removal of the tools I was interested in, there becomes less to look for.  If Milwaukee or Dewalt suddenly decides to go into the festool market space Festool is going to be in a world of hurt.  No one buys tools from those companies and thinks "hmm, wonder if they will just suddenly abandon all of this, and the N.A. market, or only sell a subset of the tools they make in the US but sell everything every place else".  Just think if Festools big red rival who currently has just one retailer in the US suddenly expanded to have more tools to make them a full replacement to Festool. You know they would be expensive, but people would go for it as they would see a company investing in the market, not announcing discontinuing of tools continually.

People will complain about price, but if a product is nice, well made, well thought out and they don't have a fear of it being abandoned, folks generally have no issue spending the money.

Offline forestmount

  • Posts: 2
I honestly don't believe that the realistic economics of establishing "factory" stores will meet normal business planning metrics. It's hard enough for even general woodworking brick and mortar stores to stay in business with reasonable profits these days and folks are not going to travel long distances to go to them for the most part. I could see a few additional locations beyond their national facility in the US for more visible presence, training and other things, but a major network of stores I don't see happening. I don't envision them selling direct online, either. That would also undermine the many Festool dealers/partners who have really stepped up and established both full stocking and well appointed displays/demonstration areas within their footprints. Many Festool dealers, who do not have retail locations, still maintain a very high level of stocking, customer service and other considerations. My Festool Pusher (you know who you are, um...Bob) :) has been to my shop multiple times, loaned me tools to, um...try...and even held a demonstration day for friends in my shop a number of years ago. No other brand and representative of a brand has gone that far for me at any time since I've been enjoying woodworking for over 20 years.

Festool already sell online here in Australia, however when you purchase you nominate a dealer. I believe the product and logistics all happen at the Festool distribution centre but the nominated dealer still gets a cut of the profits.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

Offline RDMuller

  • Posts: 295
SOunds nice in concept in high population densities. But many areas would have hundreds of miles to travel to get to a store. These stores would be very expensive to set up and run. 

Online Cheese

  • Posts: 4953
The reality is Festool is a name known by almost no one.  Not many people in construction trades have heard of them and you can find plenty of people that do a lot of woodworking that have never heard of them. 

How can you say that???   I'm sure that ever since Festool "Imperialized" their track saws & routers, every trades person and wood worker in the US has purchased the items. [poke]

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 166

How can you say that???   I'm sure that ever since Festool "Imperialized" their track saws & routers, every trades person and wood worker in the US has purchased the items. [poke]

Nah, it helped but they are waiting till they can buy tools in bulk blister packs at CostCo.

Who wouldn't want to buy their Kapex in a bulk 3 pack if it means they save 20 bucks?

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Thanks for all the replies so far!

It's really interesting to read & follow.

I'm actually very happy to read that most of you who replied have found either extraordinaire dealers that go above and beyond or found dealers that simply meet your needs and tool/accessories and consumable requirements in full with no need for change!

That is really awesome and supports my personal perception that Festool dealers are at least one step ahead (make that 3 or more for quite a couple of them!) of their competitors. Another one of my perceptions is, that if those dealers carry other brands, they are ahead of competitors with those, too.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver