Author Topic: Which router  (Read 3615 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Which router
« on: October 02, 2017, 03:49 PM »
Hello,
I have the $50 voucher from the sander promo a while back and I'm considering buying a new router. I have a track saw, a few sanders, dust extractor, and CSX so I think the router would be my next step. I would be upgrading from an inexpensive craftsman model. I'm trying to decide between the 1010 and the 1400. I have a small shop, one reason I love Festool, and rarely use a router table. I currently just have a small table top router table. I use it mostly handheld though. I use it mostly for edge profiles, dovetails, dados, etc. I'm just trying to decide which model makes the most sense for me. Any help you guys have with what you have found to be the pluses and minuses would great. Thanks!

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3402
Re: Which router
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2017, 04:33 PM »
Good question.  You definitely want 1/2" shank capability, which would argue for the 1400 over the 1010.  The question is whether you wanted to expand your capabilities even further by looking into an even heavier duty model (3.25-3.5HP) from another manufacturer for a dedicated under the table router (like a Triton or a PC), and then use the Festool purchase to get something like the 1010, which I think is, pound for pound, a more versatile machine than the 1400 (through the edging plate for example, which gives you horizontal routing capabilities -- edging plate also works on 1400, but is more cumbersome).

I don't use my 1400 all that frequently anymore after I got the 2200, which covers the heavy duty tasks (that I'm not doing on my table mounted Triton), and for lighter duty stuff I prefer to reach for the 1010.  It's really only when I need 1/2" capability and I'm working on a surface where the footprint of the 2200 is too large.  The 1400 is still a great router, though.

Note that template routing is probably better on the 1400 as well, due to the difficulty of centering the ring on the 1010 (unless you buy an aftermarket template insert, like the one from Leigh).

Another feature where the 1400 excels over the 1010 is the edge guide.  The 1010 edge guide has fixed rods, whereas the one on the 1400 are detachable.  This means you can swap in, for example, your own set of longer rods if you ever have the need to rout parallel to the edge over long distances.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2017, 09:12 AM by ear3 »
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 1989
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Which router
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2017, 05:21 PM »
I have all the Festool routers and I use the 1400 the most by far. The 1/2" shank capability is important to me.
Birdhunter

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 822
Re: Which router
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2017, 05:53 PM »
If youre only going to have one or this is the first the OF 1400 is definitely the way to start.
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 10926
  • Let's Redux / Revive / Rewind / Rollback the FOG!
Re: Which router
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2017, 06:02 PM »
The 1400 is a solid all around router that has adjustable speeds.

Glad I own one.

Peter
Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline rst

  • Posts: 1569
Re: Which router
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2017, 06:15 PM »
I own 13 routers...five PC, three Bosch, five Festool.  My 1400 gets the most use.

Offline RobBob

  • Posts: 1183
Re: Which router
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2017, 06:46 PM »
I own 13 routers...five PC, three Bosch, five Festool.  My 1400 gets the most use.

Well, I guess shouldn't feel guilty for having four routers and wanting a fifth.   [unsure]

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3021
Re: Which router
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2017, 08:29 PM »
Good question.  You definitely want 1/2" shank capability, which would argue for the 1400 over the 1010.  The question is whether you wanted to expand your capabilities even further by looking into an even heavier duty model (3.25-3.5HP) from another manufacturer for a dedicated under the table router (like a Triton or a PC), and then use the Festool purchase to get something like the 1010, which I think is, pound for pound, a more versatile machine than the 1400 (through the edging plate for example, which gives you horizontal routing capabilities -- edging plate also works on 1400, but is more cumbersome).

I don't use my 1400 all that frequently anymore after I got the 2200, which covers the heavy duty tasks (that I'm not doing on my table mounted Triton), and for lighter duty stuff I prefer to reach for the 1010.  It's really only when I need 1/2" capability and I'm working on a surface where the footprint of the 2200 is too large.  The 1400 is still a great router, though.

Note that template routing is probably better on the 1400 as well, due to the difficulty of centering the ring on the 1010 (unless you buy an aftermarket template insert, like the one from Leigh).

Another feature where the 1400 excels over the 1010 is the edge guide.  The 1010 edge guide has fixed rods, whereas the one on the 1400 are detachable.  This means you can swap in, for example, your own set of longer rods if you ever have the need to rout parallel to the edge over long distances.

This is news to me but I have the older 1000 model. Three of them ...and the 8mm rods are removable.

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2349
Re: Which router
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2017, 12:18 AM »
I really like the 1010 for handheld use - it is just so nimble and light-weight it is a great router. The 1400 is also nice - bigger and it can take 1/2 shank as already mentioned. But, if you need a small handheld for profiles and the work you describe I think the 1010 fills that need nicely. I have a collection of 8mm bits and of course it takes 1.4 inch bits too. My all time favorite is the OF2200 and so if you need a big machine I would recommend it. That and the 1010 is a nice combination for all around use.

Offline Peter Parfitt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 3800
    • New Brit Workshop on YouTube
Re: Which router
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2017, 02:16 AM »
Hi @jimmy986

The choice will depend on what you will be doing most.

If you end up with just one Festool router then the OF1400 would give the most flexibility. It has been pointed out above that a 1/2" collet capability is really important. Also, there are a lot of good value but cheap and cheerful 1/2" shank cutters around.

If you are just doing small stuff and a 1/4 or 8 mm collet would suit you then the OF1010 is a beauty and very easy to use.

Take a look at this:



Peter

Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Re: Which router
« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2017, 08:49 AM »
I haven’t watched the video from the last post but it sounds like the 1010 for now might be best and then buy a more powerful router when I get a full sized router table.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3402
Re: Which router
« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2017, 09:11 AM »
You're right, I'm wrong.  Not sure why I had the image in my head of fixed rods. 

Good question.  You definitely want 1/2" shank capability, which would argue for the 1400 over the 1010.  The question is whether you wanted to expand your capabilities even further by looking into an even heavier duty model (3.25-3.5HP) from another manufacturer for a dedicated under the table router (like a Triton or a PC), and then use the Festool purchase to get something like the 1010, which I think is, pound for pound, a more versatile machine than the 1400 (through the edging plate for example, which gives you horizontal routing capabilities -- edging plate also works on 1400, but is more cumbersome).

I don't use my 1400 all that frequently anymore after I got the 2200, which covers the heavy duty tasks (that I'm not doing on my table mounted Triton), and for lighter duty stuff I prefer to reach for the 1010.  It's really only when I need 1/2" capability and I'm working on a surface where the footprint of the 2200 is too large.  The 1400 is still a great router, though.

Note that template routing is probably better on the 1400 as well, due to the difficulty of centering the ring on the 1010 (unless you buy an aftermarket template insert, like the one from Leigh).

Another feature where the 1400 excels over the 1010 is the edge guide.  The 1010 edge guide has fixed rods, whereas the one on the 1400 are detachable.  This means you can swap in, for example, your own set of longer rods if you ever have the need to rout parallel to the edge over long distances.

This is news to me but I have the older 1000 model. Three of them ...and the 8mm rods are removable.
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 4010
Re: Which router
« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2017, 09:13 AM »
I haven’t watched the video from the last post but it sounds like the 1010 for now might be best and then buy a more powerful router when I get a full sized router table.

I was thinking the same, but after having a handling of the 1010 and 1400, I found that I preferred the ergonomics of the 1400.
You may be wise to test drive them in person.

Or on the other hand neither would be bad to have.

Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Re: Which router
« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2017, 09:22 AM »
Now after watching the video I feel like the 1010 is still a good first choice. 95% of what I use a router for is edge profile and dovetails and I have found myself wishing for a smaller easier to control router. I have done dados and things like that when I wish for more power but I do have dado blades for my table saw if I need something more powerful. Once I increase my projects and get a little more complicated I can look at the 1400 or 2200. My craftsman can serve for a bit if I want a 1/2” but. We’ll see how many more times I change my mind.

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 4010
Re: Which router
« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2017, 09:25 AM »
Giving the reasoning behind the decision making always makes it easier to pick apart the process.

Now after watching the video I feel like the 1010 is still a good first choice. 95% of what I use a router for is edge profile and dovetails and I have found myself wishing for a smaller easier to control router. I have done dados and things like that when I wish for more power but I do have dado blades for my table saw if I need something more powerful. Once I increase my projects and get a little more complicated I can look at the 1400 or 2200. My craftsman can serve for a bit if I want a 1/2” but. We’ll see how many more times I change my mind.

The reasoning you ^gave^ is hard to argue with, and hence it sound like a decent plan to keep the craftsman for the odd jobs that require it.

Offline amt

  • Posts: 363
Re: Which router
« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2017, 11:09 AM »
My preference is 1010, then 2200.  I don't like routers where the dust attachment has to be added/removed, like to the 1400.  They tend to break eventually or get lost.  The 1010 is a joy to use.  It is so light that I don't feel I need to get a palm router.  The 2200 gets pulled out for bigger jobs like large dados or deep mortises, or anything where a lot of weight becomes an advantage.

Offline Peter Parfitt

  • Magazine/Blog Author
  • *
  • Posts: 3800
    • New Brit Workshop on YouTube
Re: Which router
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2017, 12:01 PM »
My preference is 1010, then 2200.  I don't like routers where the dust attachment has to be added/removed, like to the 1400.  They tend to break eventually or get lost.  The 1010 is a joy to use.  It is so light that I don't feel I need to get a palm router.  The 2200 gets pulled out for bigger jobs like large dados or deep mortises, or anything where a lot of weight becomes an advantage.

That is the only drawback of the OF1400 - my plastic dust attachment got damaged and I had to buy a new one. I just wish that Festool would look at this again and try and incorporate something similar to the OF2200.

I agree the OF1010 is a sweet router and the OF2200 is a beauty.

Peter

Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 1989
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Which router
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2017, 01:41 PM »
I think the 1400 is too pretty a router to bury under a router table especially when a PC motor and a lift does a better job at a cheaper price.
Birdhunter

Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 259
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: Which router
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2017, 01:44 PM »
Which Craftsman model do you have? I owned two before I got my Festools, and in some respects I regret "upgrading".

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 822
Re: Which router
« Reply #19 on: October 03, 2017, 04:40 PM »
I think the 1400 is too pretty a router to bury under a router table especially when a PC motor and a lift does a better job at a cheaper price.
And me MUCH more powerful! There is nothing better than the Porter Cable 7518 in a nice Incra, Woodpeckers, Benchdog, etc lift in a good solid cast iron router table top and steel stand! I love it!
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 4010
Re: Which router
« Reply #20 on: October 03, 2017, 05:44 PM »
I think the 1400 is too pretty a router to bury under a router table especially when a PC motor and a lift does a better job at a cheaper price.
And me MUCH more powerful! There is nothing better than the Porter Cable 7518 in a nice Incra, Woodpeckers, Benchdog, etc lift in a good solid cast iron router table top and steel stand! I love it!

And something like a Triton where the language is 230v and there is no PC router in 230v.

If the 1400 was half the cost of a 7518, then one could make an economic case for using the wrong tool... Otherwise it is an absurdity.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1153
Re: Which router
« Reply #21 on: October 03, 2017, 05:53 PM »
I don't like routers where the dust attachment has to be added/removed, like to the 1400.  They tend to break eventually or get lost.  The 1010 is a joy to use. 
Hate that dust port setup on 1010. It sits to low, can't be removed and interferes with guides, jigs, router sleds, tight spaces, and stuff around. Much prefer upward facing ports like 2200.

Offline jarbroen

  • Posts: 10
Re: Which router
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2017, 06:22 PM »
I just got a 1400 for my bday(first router ever) and it's been awesome to use.  With the guide rail stop I can line up on a plywood panel to route a dado.  No worries about shelves being slightly off - I can cut all three sides of a cabinet in one go.
And no need to lug a huge sheet of plywood onto my dinky tablesaw or setup dado blades.

Kind of the same principle why I really like the TS55 vs. using my tablesaw.  It's just so much easier for me to setup and use. 

Edge profile has been pretty easy as well - IE 1/4" roundover bit.  The 1400 has a super smooth start and plenty of power.  It hasn't jumped around on me unless I did something stupid (move into wood before full speed).
Where it gets a little challenging is if you're standing it on a narrow profile like the edge of 18mm plywood.  Trickier to balance vs. cutting from the face of the plywood.  However, with a little bit of setup you can rig up another board on the side of your piece to give the router extra support.
If I had money/space for multiple routers I could see where a little panel router would excel at the 'on edge' routing.  Otherwise, the 1400 seems like the winner to me.

The removable dust collection is okay... as long as I remember to install it before I install some of my longer bits... :)
Otherwise, dust collection works well with my CT26 cranked up.  The chip collector that attaches to the bottom is kind of a pita though.  Easy to clunk into corners if you're trying to work in a tight spot like a drawer box.


Offline antss

  • Posts: 1432
Re: Which router
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2017, 08:37 PM »
Quote
And something like a Triton where the language is 230v and there is no PC router in 230v.

PC made the 7519 router in a 220v model for years.  Countertop shops used to love em.   Pretty sure it was discontinued after Black @ Decker took over.

Offline kook

  • Posts: 2
Re: Which router
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2017, 08:24 AM »
Porter Cable router 874203 is also 240 volt. It is used under the table in Onsrud inverted pin routers and while unfortunately discontinued by PC, replacements are still available from Onsrud stock (at Onsrud prices).

Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Re: Which router
« Reply #25 on: October 05, 2017, 11:35 AM »
I think I may be leaning more towards the 1400 now. It says it comes with the collet for the 1/4" and for the 8mm. Is it 1/2" standard then?

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 822
Re: Which router
« Reply #26 on: October 05, 2017, 12:22 PM »
I think I may be leaning more towards the 1400 now. It says it comes with the collet for the 1/4" and for the 8mm. Is it 1/2" standard then?
Yep.
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 8069
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Re: Which router
« Reply #27 on: October 05, 2017, 12:31 PM »
I think I may be leaning more towards the 1400 now. It says it comes with the collet for the 1/4" and for the 8mm. Is it 1/2" standard then?

I am pretty sure the 1400 (in the US) comes with 1/4" and 1/2" collets. Which seems to be indicated on Festool USA site. Maybe the 8mm also? There have been different package configurations over the years. I can't imagine that it doesn't include the 1/2" since it is designed to be able to handle that size.

Maybe @Festool USA  can get a definite confirmation on exactly which collets are currently included with the 1400 router?

Seth

Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Re: Which router
« Reply #28 on: October 05, 2017, 01:08 PM »
https://www.festoolusa.com/products/routing/routers/574692---of-1400-eq-f-plus-usa#Overview
It only lists the 1/4 and 8mm. Maybe they don't list the 1/2" because it isn't considered "additional". I'm not sure.

Also, are there other options for the router bit sortainer? It seems expensive but would be nice to have.