Author Topic: Which router  (Read 3317 times)

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Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Which router
« on: October 02, 2017, 03:49 PM »
Hello,
I have the $50 voucher from the sander promo a while back and I'm considering buying a new router. I have a track saw, a few sanders, dust extractor, and CSX so I think the router would be my next step. I would be upgrading from an inexpensive craftsman model. I'm trying to decide between the 1010 and the 1400. I have a small shop, one reason I love Festool, and rarely use a router table. I currently just have a small table top router table. I use it mostly handheld though. I use it mostly for edge profiles, dovetails, dados, etc. I'm just trying to decide which model makes the most sense for me. Any help you guys have with what you have found to be the pluses and minuses would great. Thanks!

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3295
Re: Which router
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2017, 04:33 PM »
Good question.  You definitely want 1/2" shank capability, which would argue for the 1400 over the 1010.  The question is whether you wanted to expand your capabilities even further by looking into an even heavier duty model (3.25-3.5HP) from another manufacturer for a dedicated under the table router (like a Triton or a PC), and then use the Festool purchase to get something like the 1010, which I think is, pound for pound, a more versatile machine than the 1400 (through the edging plate for example, which gives you horizontal routing capabilities -- edging plate also works on 1400, but is more cumbersome).

I don't use my 1400 all that frequently anymore after I got the 2200, which covers the heavy duty tasks (that I'm not doing on my table mounted Triton), and for lighter duty stuff I prefer to reach for the 1010.  It's really only when I need 1/2" capability and I'm working on a surface where the footprint of the 2200 is too large.  The 1400 is still a great router, though.

Note that template routing is probably better on the 1400 as well, due to the difficulty of centering the ring on the 1010 (unless you buy an aftermarket template insert, like the one from Leigh).

Another feature where the 1400 excels over the 1010 is the edge guide.  The 1010 edge guide has fixed rods, whereas the one on the 1400 are detachable.  This means you can swap in, for example, your own set of longer rods if you ever have the need to rout parallel to the edge over long distances.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2017, 09:12 AM by ear3 »
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Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 1950
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Which router
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2017, 05:21 PM »
I have all the Festool routers and I use the 1400 the most by far. The 1/2" shank capability is important to me.
Birdhunter

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 778
Re: Which router
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2017, 05:53 PM »
If youre only going to have one or this is the first the OF 1400 is definitely the way to start.
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Online Peter Halle

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Re: Which router
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2017, 06:02 PM »
The 1400 is a solid all around router that has adjustable speeds.

Glad I own one.

Peter
Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline rst

  • Posts: 1538
Re: Which router
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2017, 06:15 PM »
I own 13 routers...five PC, three Bosch, five Festool.  My 1400 gets the most use.

Offline RobBob

  • Posts: 1140
Re: Which router
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2017, 06:46 PM »
I own 13 routers...five PC, three Bosch, five Festool.  My 1400 gets the most use.

Well, I guess shouldn't feel guilty for having four routers and wanting a fifth.   [unsure]

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 2914
Re: Which router
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2017, 08:29 PM »
Good question.  You definitely want 1/2" shank capability, which would argue for the 1400 over the 1010.  The question is whether you wanted to expand your capabilities even further by looking into an even heavier duty model (3.25-3.5HP) from another manufacturer for a dedicated under the table router (like a Triton or a PC), and then use the Festool purchase to get something like the 1010, which I think is, pound for pound, a more versatile machine than the 1400 (through the edging plate for example, which gives you horizontal routing capabilities -- edging plate also works on 1400, but is more cumbersome).

I don't use my 1400 all that frequently anymore after I got the 2200, which covers the heavy duty tasks (that I'm not doing on my table mounted Triton), and for lighter duty stuff I prefer to reach for the 1010.  It's really only when I need 1/2" capability and I'm working on a surface where the footprint of the 2200 is too large.  The 1400 is still a great router, though.

Note that template routing is probably better on the 1400 as well, due to the difficulty of centering the ring on the 1010 (unless you buy an aftermarket template insert, like the one from Leigh).

Another feature where the 1400 excels over the 1010 is the edge guide.  The 1010 edge guide has fixed rods, whereas the one on the 1400 are detachable.  This means you can swap in, for example, your own set of longer rods if you ever have the need to rout parallel to the edge over long distances.

This is news to me but I have the older 1000 model. Three of them ...and the 8mm rods are removable.

Offline ScotF

  • Posts: 2318
Re: Which router
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2017, 12:18 AM »
I really like the 1010 for handheld use - it is just so nimble and light-weight it is a great router. The 1400 is also nice - bigger and it can take 1/2 shank as already mentioned. But, if you need a small handheld for profiles and the work you describe I think the 1010 fills that need nicely. I have a collection of 8mm bits and of course it takes 1.4 inch bits too. My all time favorite is the OF2200 and so if you need a big machine I would recommend it. That and the 1010 is a nice combination for all around use.

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Which router
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2017, 02:16 AM »
Hi @jimmy986

The choice will depend on what you will be doing most.

If you end up with just one Festool router then the OF1400 would give the most flexibility. It has been pointed out above that a 1/2" collet capability is really important. Also, there are a lot of good value but cheap and cheerful 1/2" shank cutters around.

If you are just doing small stuff and a 1/4 or 8 mm collet would suit you then the OF1010 is a beauty and very easy to use.

Take a look at this:



Peter

Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Re: Which router
« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2017, 08:49 AM »
I haven’t watched the video from the last post but it sounds like the 1010 for now might be best and then buy a more powerful router when I get a full sized router table.

Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3295
Re: Which router
« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2017, 09:11 AM »
You're right, I'm wrong.  Not sure why I had the image in my head of fixed rods. 

Good question.  You definitely want 1/2" shank capability, which would argue for the 1400 over the 1010.  The question is whether you wanted to expand your capabilities even further by looking into an even heavier duty model (3.25-3.5HP) from another manufacturer for a dedicated under the table router (like a Triton or a PC), and then use the Festool purchase to get something like the 1010, which I think is, pound for pound, a more versatile machine than the 1400 (through the edging plate for example, which gives you horizontal routing capabilities -- edging plate also works on 1400, but is more cumbersome).

I don't use my 1400 all that frequently anymore after I got the 2200, which covers the heavy duty tasks (that I'm not doing on my table mounted Triton), and for lighter duty stuff I prefer to reach for the 1010.  It's really only when I need 1/2" capability and I'm working on a surface where the footprint of the 2200 is too large.  The 1400 is still a great router, though.

Note that template routing is probably better on the 1400 as well, due to the difficulty of centering the ring on the 1010 (unless you buy an aftermarket template insert, like the one from Leigh).

Another feature where the 1400 excels over the 1010 is the edge guide.  The 1010 edge guide has fixed rods, whereas the one on the 1400 are detachable.  This means you can swap in, for example, your own set of longer rods if you ever have the need to rout parallel to the edge over long distances.

This is news to me but I have the older 1000 model. Three of them ...and the 8mm rods are removable.
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • DX 93 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3914
Re: Which router
« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2017, 09:13 AM »
I haven’t watched the video from the last post but it sounds like the 1010 for now might be best and then buy a more powerful router when I get a full sized router table.

I was thinking the same, but after having a handling of the 1010 and 1400, I found that I preferred the ergonomics of the 1400.
You may be wise to test drive them in person.

Or on the other hand neither would be bad to have.

Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Re: Which router
« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2017, 09:22 AM »
Now after watching the video I feel like the 1010 is still a good first choice. 95% of what I use a router for is edge profile and dovetails and I have found myself wishing for a smaller easier to control router. I have done dados and things like that when I wish for more power but I do have dado blades for my table saw if I need something more powerful. Once I increase my projects and get a little more complicated I can look at the 1400 or 2200. My craftsman can serve for a bit if I want a 1/2” but. We’ll see how many more times I change my mind.

Offline Holmz

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Re: Which router
« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2017, 09:25 AM »
Giving the reasoning behind the decision making always makes it easier to pick apart the process.

Now after watching the video I feel like the 1010 is still a good first choice. 95% of what I use a router for is edge profile and dovetails and I have found myself wishing for a smaller easier to control router. I have done dados and things like that when I wish for more power but I do have dado blades for my table saw if I need something more powerful. Once I increase my projects and get a little more complicated I can look at the 1400 or 2200. My craftsman can serve for a bit if I want a 1/2” but. We’ll see how many more times I change my mind.

The reasoning you ^gave^ is hard to argue with, and hence it sound like a decent plan to keep the craftsman for the odd jobs that require it.

Offline amt

  • Posts: 361
Re: Which router
« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2017, 11:09 AM »
My preference is 1010, then 2200.  I don't like routers where the dust attachment has to be added/removed, like to the 1400.  They tend to break eventually or get lost.  The 1010 is a joy to use.  It is so light that I don't feel I need to get a palm router.  The 2200 gets pulled out for bigger jobs like large dados or deep mortises, or anything where a lot of weight becomes an advantage.

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Which router
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2017, 12:01 PM »
My preference is 1010, then 2200.  I don't like routers where the dust attachment has to be added/removed, like to the 1400.  They tend to break eventually or get lost.  The 1010 is a joy to use.  It is so light that I don't feel I need to get a palm router.  The 2200 gets pulled out for bigger jobs like large dados or deep mortises, or anything where a lot of weight becomes an advantage.

That is the only drawback of the OF1400 - my plastic dust attachment got damaged and I had to buy a new one. I just wish that Festool would look at this again and try and incorporate something similar to the OF2200.

I agree the OF1010 is a sweet router and the OF2200 is a beauty.

Peter

Offline Birdhunter

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Re: Which router
« Reply #17 on: October 03, 2017, 01:41 PM »
I think the 1400 is too pretty a router to bury under a router table especially when a PC motor and a lift does a better job at a cheaper price.
Birdhunter

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Re: Which router
« Reply #18 on: October 03, 2017, 01:44 PM »
Which Craftsman model do you have? I owned two before I got my Festools, and in some respects I regret "upgrading".

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 778
Re: Which router
« Reply #19 on: October 03, 2017, 04:40 PM »
I think the 1400 is too pretty a router to bury under a router table especially when a PC motor and a lift does a better job at a cheaper price.
And me MUCH more powerful! There is nothing better than the Porter Cable 7518 in a nice Incra, Woodpeckers, Benchdog, etc lift in a good solid cast iron router table top and steel stand! I love it!
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3914
Re: Which router
« Reply #20 on: October 03, 2017, 05:44 PM »
I think the 1400 is too pretty a router to bury under a router table especially when a PC motor and a lift does a better job at a cheaper price.
And me MUCH more powerful! There is nothing better than the Porter Cable 7518 in a nice Incra, Woodpeckers, Benchdog, etc lift in a good solid cast iron router table top and steel stand! I love it!

And something like a Triton where the language is 230v and there is no PC router in 230v.

If the 1400 was half the cost of a 7518, then one could make an economic case for using the wrong tool... Otherwise it is an absurdity.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1064
Re: Which router
« Reply #21 on: October 03, 2017, 05:53 PM »
I don't like routers where the dust attachment has to be added/removed, like to the 1400.  They tend to break eventually or get lost.  The 1010 is a joy to use. 
Hate that dust port setup on 1010. It sits to low, can't be removed and interferes with guides, jigs, router sleds, tight spaces, and stuff around. Much prefer upward facing ports like 2200.

Offline jarbroen

  • Posts: 6
Re: Which router
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2017, 06:22 PM »
I just got a 1400 for my bday(first router ever) and it's been awesome to use.  With the guide rail stop I can line up on a plywood panel to route a dado.  No worries about shelves being slightly off - I can cut all three sides of a cabinet in one go.
And no need to lug a huge sheet of plywood onto my dinky tablesaw or setup dado blades.

Kind of the same principle why I really like the TS55 vs. using my tablesaw.  It's just so much easier for me to setup and use. 

Edge profile has been pretty easy as well - IE 1/4" roundover bit.  The 1400 has a super smooth start and plenty of power.  It hasn't jumped around on me unless I did something stupid (move into wood before full speed).
Where it gets a little challenging is if you're standing it on a narrow profile like the edge of 18mm plywood.  Trickier to balance vs. cutting from the face of the plywood.  However, with a little bit of setup you can rig up another board on the side of your piece to give the router extra support.
If I had money/space for multiple routers I could see where a little panel router would excel at the 'on edge' routing.  Otherwise, the 1400 seems like the winner to me.

The removable dust collection is okay... as long as I remember to install it before I install some of my longer bits... :)
Otherwise, dust collection works well with my CT26 cranked up.  The chip collector that attaches to the bottom is kind of a pita though.  Easy to clunk into corners if you're trying to work in a tight spot like a drawer box.


Offline antss

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Re: Which router
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2017, 08:37 PM »
Quote
And something like a Triton where the language is 230v and there is no PC router in 230v.

PC made the 7519 router in a 220v model for years.  Countertop shops used to love em.   Pretty sure it was discontinued after Black @ Decker took over.

Offline kook

  • Posts: 1
Re: Which router
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2017, 08:24 AM »
Porter Cable router 874203 is also 240 volt. It is used under the table in Onsrud inverted pin routers and while unfortunately discontinued by PC, replacements are still available from Onsrud stock (at Onsrud prices).

Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Re: Which router
« Reply #25 on: October 05, 2017, 11:35 AM »
I think I may be leaning more towards the 1400 now. It says it comes with the collet for the 1/4" and for the 8mm. Is it 1/2" standard then?

Offline ben_r_

  • Posts: 778
Re: Which router
« Reply #26 on: October 05, 2017, 12:22 PM »
I think I may be leaning more towards the 1400 now. It says it comes with the collet for the 1/4" and for the 8mm. Is it 1/2" standard then?
Yep.
If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Which router
« Reply #27 on: October 05, 2017, 12:31 PM »
I think I may be leaning more towards the 1400 now. It says it comes with the collet for the 1/4" and for the 8mm. Is it 1/2" standard then?

I am pretty sure the 1400 (in the US) comes with 1/4" and 1/2" collets. Which seems to be indicated on Festool USA site. Maybe the 8mm also? There have been different package configurations over the years. I can't imagine that it doesn't include the 1/2" since it is designed to be able to handle that size.

Maybe @Festool USA  can get a definite confirmation on exactly which collets are currently included with the 1400 router?

Seth

Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Re: Which router
« Reply #28 on: October 05, 2017, 01:08 PM »
https://www.festoolusa.com/products/routing/routers/574692---of-1400-eq-f-plus-usa#Overview
It only lists the 1/4 and 8mm. Maybe they don't list the 1/2" because it isn't considered "additional". I'm not sure.

Also, are there other options for the router bit sortainer? It seems expensive but would be nice to have.


Offline ishmerc

  • Posts: 83
Re: Which router
« Reply #30 on: October 05, 2017, 02:02 PM »
The 1400 use to include 3 collet ,8mm,1/4 and 1/2 .Now it only come with 8mm and 1/4 .I don't understand why they didn't take out the 8mm instead of the 1/2 .Most of the router bits in the US is 1/4 or 1/2 .

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Re: Which router
« Reply #31 on: October 05, 2017, 02:05 PM »
So I wouldn't be able to use my 1/2" bits with the 1400?

Offline VW MICK

  • Posts: 843
Re: Which router
« Reply #32 on: October 05, 2017, 02:24 PM »
@jimmy986

The Of1400 is nice I've never had it stall or slow up

I got mine and had to buy the 1/4 collet (which cost £40 and has a different size spanner )

But having said that it is a really smooth powerful router

I wouldn't be without it. And will probably get another

Mick

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Which router
« Reply #33 on: October 05, 2017, 04:09 PM »
@jimmy986

The Of1400 is nice I've never had it stall or slow up

I got mine and had to buy the 1/4 collet (which cost £40 and has a different size spanner )

But having said that it is a really smooth powerful router

I wouldn't be without it. And will probably get another

Mick

Hi Mick,

The Festool collets (for the OF1400 and OF2200) all have the same size spanner - did you buy a third party collet?

Peter

Offline ishmerc

  • Posts: 83
Re: Which router
« Reply #34 on: October 05, 2017, 04:11 PM »
So I wouldn't be able to use my 1/2" bits with the 1400?
You've to buy the 1/2 in order to use your 1/2 bits .

Offline Bob D.

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Re: Which router
« Reply #35 on: October 05, 2017, 04:43 PM »
I bought my OF1400 this year and it came with all three collets. Maybe it was old stock don't know but I doubt I will run into many 8mm bits here in the states. Still, I think the router should come with all three wherever it's sold. When I have bought any of my other routers they all came with 1/4 and 1/2 inch collets except for those that are 1/4 inch only.
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Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3914
Re: Which router
« Reply #36 on: October 05, 2017, 05:15 PM »
The 1400 use to include 3 collet ,8mm,1/4 and 1/2 .Now it only come with 8mm and 1/4 .I don't understand why they didn't take out the 8mm instead of the 1/2 .Most of the router bits in the US is 1/4 or 1/2 .

Festool is made in Europe.
The more common small size in Europe is 8-mm over 6-mm or 1/4".

They know everyone with want 1/2" . (which would not fill me with glee)

Offline Don Ware

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Re: Which router
« Reply #37 on: October 05, 2017, 06:04 PM »
In the USA the 1400 comes will 3 collets 1/4", 8mm, and 1/2"
Don Ware
Anderson Plywood Sales
Culver City, California

Offline jimmy986

  • Posts: 62
Re: Which router
« Reply #38 on: October 05, 2017, 06:18 PM »
In the USA the 1400 comes will 3 collets 1/4", 8mm, and 1/2"

Thanks. That would save $50 which makes a purchase more palatable.

Offline McNally Family

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Re: Which router
« Reply #39 on: October 05, 2017, 06:31 PM »
The 1400 use to include 3 collet ,8mm,1/4 and 1/2 .Now it only come with 8mm and 1/4 .I don't understand why they didn't take out the 8mm instead of the 1/2 .Most of the router bits in the US is 1/4 or 1/2 .


@Shane Holland

If you visit Toolnut, and look for the Festool 1400 router, it indicates that all three collets are included:


 Includes:

(1) 1/4" Collet
(1) 8 mm Collet
(1) 1/2" Collet
« Last Edit: October 05, 2017, 06:37 PM by McNally Family »
GREEN: In order of purchase = | CT26 w/Installer Cleaning Set | C18 5.2 Set w/Centrotec Installer's Set | RS 2 E | Hose w/ Sleeve 3.5m | 115mm X 226mm Hand Sanding Block | 80mm X 133mm Hand Sanding Block | HSK D21.5 5m hose | CT Boom Arm Bundle Set |  Won the CXS Li 2.6 90 Limited Edition on 06/20/2016 | Metric Parallel Guide Set | 1080 Plate for custom MFT | OF 1400 EQ Router (metric) w/accessories | FS1400/2-LR 32 Guide Rail (x1) | Next  Purchase: Something else Metric |

RED: // Mafell P1cc  //  MT55cc  // Next purchase: TBD

Online Cheese

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Re: Which router
« Reply #40 on: October 05, 2017, 06:59 PM »
The Festool catalog lists all 3 collets.

The Festool website lists only 1/4” and 8mm.

Offline ear3

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Re: Which router
« Reply #41 on: October 06, 2017, 11:24 AM »
Example #532 on why the FestoolUSA website is so awesome.

The Festool catalog lists all 3 collets.

The Festool website lists only 1/4” and 8mm.
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • DX 93 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/Long-Life Bag • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Online Cochese

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Re: Which router
« Reply #42 on: October 06, 2017, 11:36 AM »
In the USA the 1400 comes will 3 collets 1/4", 8mm, and 1/2"

Thanks. That would save $50 which makes a purchase more palatable.

You need to ask yourself what you're going to get out of the purchase to make it an upgrade over what you have. In many ways, it was a push scenario for me. I got a little bit better ergonomics in exchange for some things like poorer visibility. I think knowing what I do now, I wouldn't have sold my 28084 and spent my money on upgrading something else in my shop.

Offline hrrb

  • Posts: 184
Re: Which router
« Reply #43 on: October 06, 2017, 12:00 PM »
....
Hi Mick,

The Festool collets (for the OF1400 and OF2200) all have the same size spanner - did you buy a third party collet?

Peter

Hmmm...have they changed the collets?

I own an OF 1400 from 2008 where the 8 and 12 mm collets need a 22mm spanner and the 1/2" collet needs a 24mm spanner!

Kind regards Henrik

Offline BBuild

  • Posts: 74
Re: Which router
« Reply #44 on: October 06, 2017, 12:10 PM »
Good question.  You definitely want 1/2" shank capability, which would argue for the 1400 over the 1010.  The question is whether you wanted to expand your capabilities even further by looking into an even heavier duty model (3.25-3.5HP) from another manufacturer for a dedicated under the table router (like a Triton or a PC), and then use the Festool purchase to get something like the 1010, which I think is, pound for pound, a more versatile machine than the 1400 (through the edging plate for example, which gives you horizontal routing capabilities -- edging plate also works on 1400, but is more cumbersome).

I don't use my 1400 all that frequently anymore after I got the 2200, which covers the heavy duty tasks (that I'm not doing on my table mounted Triton), and for lighter duty stuff I prefer to reach for the 1010.  It's really only when I need 1/2" capability and I'm working on a surface where the footprint of the 2200 is too large.  The 1400 is still a great router, though.

Note that template routing is probably better on the 1400 as well, due to the difficulty of centering the ring on the 1010 (unless you buy an aftermarket template insert, like the one from Leigh).

Another feature where the 1400 excels over the 1010 is the edge guide.  The 1010 edge guide has fixed rods, whereas the one on the 1400 are detachable.  This means you can swap in, for example, your own set of longer rods if you ever have the need to rout parallel to the edge over long distances.

This is news to me but I have the older 1000 model. Three of them ...and the 8mm rods are removable.

Same here but maybe they changed the design since I bought the edge guide for my 1010 as my rods are removable also.
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Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Which router
« Reply #45 on: October 06, 2017, 12:42 PM »
....
Hi Mick,

The Festool collets (for the OF1400 and OF2200) all have the same size spanner - did you buy a third party collet?

Peter

Hmmm...have they changed the collets?

I own an OF 1400 from 2008 where the 8 and 12 mm collets need a 22mm spanner and the 1/2" collet needs a 24mm spanner!

Kind regards Henrik

Hi Henrik,

I had to go to the workshop and check...

All of my collets for the OF1400 and OF2200 are interchangeable and they all take a 24 mm spanner. I have 1/4", 8mm, 12 mm and 1/2" collets. The OF2200 is about 6 years old and the OF1400 is about 4 years old.

Peter

Offline jimmy986

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Re: Which router
« Reply #46 on: October 06, 2017, 12:55 PM »
In the USA the 1400 comes will 3 collets 1/4", 8mm, and 1/2"

Thanks. That would save $50 which makes a purchase more palatable.

You need to ask yourself what you're going to get out of the purchase to make it an upgrade over what you have. In many ways, it was a push scenario for me. I got a little bit better ergonomics in exchange for some things like poorer visibility. I think knowing what I do now, I wouldn't have sold my 28084 and spent my money on upgrading something else in my shop.

In terms of what I THINK I will get: better ergonomics, better dust collection(my craftsman is awful), more consistent power, one base instead of plunge and fixed that take up extra space, use with my tracks.... anything I'm missing?

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Re: Which router
« Reply #47 on: October 06, 2017, 01:39 PM »
In the USA the 1400 comes will 3 collets 1/4", 8mm, and 1/2"

Thanks. That would save $50 which makes a purchase more palatable.

You need to ask yourself what you're going to get out of the purchase to make it an upgrade over what you have. In many ways, it was a push scenario for me. I got a little bit better ergonomics in exchange for some things like poorer visibility. I think knowing what I do now, I wouldn't have sold my 28084 and spent my money on upgrading something else in my shop.

In terms of what I THINK I will get: better ergonomics, better dust collection(my craftsman is awful), more consistent power, one base instead of plunge and fixed that take up extra space, use with my tracks.... anything I'm missing?

The Craftsmans I had were actually pretty good with dust collection. I didn't see much improvement there, and still have to buy another chute for use with larger bits. Power was never an issue for me either. I enjoyed having more than one base because I could mount the fixed and have an extra table router setup. With the D-handle I had ergonomics are a push. The depth lock on the handle is nice, as is the dust ports and power supply lining up. It just wasn't as big of an upgrade as the price suggested.

Offline altiplano

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Re: Which router
« Reply #48 on: October 06, 2017, 06:56 PM »
I have had a Makita 2.25 hp router for years I use it in and out of a table... it's really quite good.

But I always wanted a Festool router, primarily for the superior dust collection. I thought the 1400 would be the best way to go... in the end though I decided on a 1010...

I did this for a number of reasons:
-it still works with my Leigh D4R jig which uses 8mm bits
-it works with my bosch ofa 32 kit
-it's small and light weight with adequate power for most needs
-I really like the edging plate attachment - super easy with the light router
-my Makita can still work with 1/2 bits out of the table if needed
-my Makita now primarily resides in my router table though

You can probably buy the OF1010 and a Makita RF1101 for the same price as an OF1400.

Then you'll have a full time under the table router, a sexy, lightweight, easy to handle Festool router, and all the capability... up to 1/2"

Offline jimmy986

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Re: Which router
« Reply #49 on: October 06, 2017, 07:54 PM »
I have had a Makita 2.25 hp router for years I use it in and out of a table... it's really quite good.

But I always wanted a Festool router, primarily for the superior dust collection. I thought the 1400 would be the best way to go... in the end though I decided on a 1010...

I did this for a number of reasons:
-it still works with my Leigh D4R jig which uses 8mm bits
-it works with my bosch ofa 32 kit
-it's small and light weight with adequate power for most needs
-I really like the edging plate attachment - super easy with the light router
-my Makita can still work with 1/2 bits out of the table if needed
-my Makita now primarily resides in my router table though

You can probably buy the OF1010 and a Makita RF1101 for the same price as an OF1400.

Then you'll have a full time under the table router, a sexy, lightweight, easy to handle Festool router, and all the capability... up to 1/2"

I keep going back and forth on whether to get the 1400 or 1010. Most of my work with a router has been edge profiles, bowtie inlays, and dovetail templates. I have done SOME dados/grooves but not a ton. The 1010's smaller profile seems like it would be nice for edges, bowties, and the dovetails. I could keep the craftsman for my small router table for now and pull it out for dados when I would probably want the 1/2" shank. Have you found any issues with the smaller diameter bits for the type of work I do?

Offline ScotF

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Re: Which router
« Reply #50 on: October 07, 2017, 01:17 AM »
I have had a Makita 2.25 hp router for years I use it in and out of a table... it's really quite good.

But I always wanted a Festool router, primarily for the superior dust collection. I thought the 1400 would be the best way to go... in the end though I decided on a 1010...

I did this for a number of reasons:
-it still works with my Leigh D4R jig which uses 8mm bits
-it works with my bosch ofa 32 kit
-it's small and light weight with adequate power for most needs
-I really like the edging plate attachment - super easy with the light router
-my Makita can still work with 1/2 bits out of the table if needed
-my Makita now primarily resides in my router table though

You can probably buy the OF1010 and a Makita RF1101 for the same price as an OF1400.

Then you'll have a full time under the table router, a sexy, lightweight, easy to handle Festool router, and all the capability... up to 1/2"

I keep going back and forth on whether to get the 1400 or 1010. Most of my work with a router has been edge profiles, bowtie inlays, and dovetail templates. I have done SOME dados/grooves but not a ton. The 1010's smaller profile seems like it would be nice for edges, bowties, and the dovetails. I could keep the craftsman for my small router table for now and pull it out for dados when I would probably want the 1/2" shank. Have you found any issues with the smaller diameter bits for the type of work I do?

Smaller bits work fine and 8mm are really, really good if available to you. In NA, you can get them from Lee Valley. 1/4 inch bits have never given me trouble and for handheld use I think that they work just fine. Grooves and dados are not a problem - you just might have to take a few passes and slow your feed rate. DC on the 1010 is very good and it is light weight and easy to maneuver. The 1400 is also good, heavier, but it takes all the bits so more versatility there. The fence is better, DC is more finicky with an extra part and ou have to buy the guide stop if you want to use it on a rail (which is great for dado cuts and grooves).

Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Which router
« Reply #51 on: October 07, 2017, 01:54 AM »

Smaller bits work fine and 8mm are really, really good if available to you. In NA, you can get them from Lee Valley. 1/4 inch bits have never given me trouble and for handheld use I think that they work just fine. Grooves and dados are not a problem - you just might have to take a few passes and slow your feed rate. DC on the 1010 is very good and it is light weight and easy to maneuver. The 1400 is also good, heavier, but it takes all the bits so more versatility there. The fence is better, DC is more finicky with an extra part and ou have to buy the guide stop if you want to use it on a rail (which is great for dado cuts and grooves).

I agree 100% with @ScotF - the OF1010 sounds like the one you need. I found the OF1400 just a dash too heavy for a lot (all day usage) of dovetail work.

Peter

Offline jimmy986

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Re: Which router
« Reply #52 on: October 07, 2017, 11:42 AM »
One question I didn't think about is whether or not the of 1010 or 1400 would work with the rockler dovetail jig. Does anyone have experience with this?
http://www.rockler.com/rockler-s-complete-dovetail-jig

Online Cheese

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Re: Which router
« Reply #53 on: October 07, 2017, 12:21 PM »
I keep going back and forth on whether to get the 1400 or 1010. Most of my work with a router has been edge profiles, bowtie inlays, and dovetail templates. I have done SOME dados/grooves but not a ton. The 1010's smaller profile seems like it would be nice for edges, bowties, and the dovetails. I could keep the craftsman for my small router table for now and pull it out for dados when I would probably want the 1/2" shank. Have you found any issues with the smaller diameter bits for the type of work I do?

I have both the 1010 & 1400. I tend to use the 1010 probably 80-85% of the time because its so small and maneuverable. I use 1/4" shank Whiteside router bits and they are more than up to the task. Edge profiles, dados and through slots in 3/4" Jatoba are all easily accomplished with the 1010. I've also routed key slots for clamps in 80/20 aluminum tubes without an issue.

Here are some pics:
Dado for cabinet back in 3/4" maple ply
Slots in Jatoba for HVAC vents
Clamp slot in 80/20
« Last Edit: October 07, 2017, 12:23 PM by Cheese »

Offline ScotF

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Re: Which router
« Reply #54 on: October 07, 2017, 01:40 PM »
I keep going back and forth on whether to get the 1400 or 1010. Most of my work with a router has been edge profiles, bowtie inlays, and dovetail templates. I have done SOME dados/grooves but not a ton. The 1010's smaller profile seems like it would be nice for edges, bowties, and the dovetails. I could keep the craftsman for my small router table for now and pull it out for dados when I would probably want the 1/2" shank. Have you found any issues with the smaller diameter bits for the type of work I do?

I have both the 1010 & 1400. I tend to use the 1010 probably 80-85% of the time because its so small and maneuverable. I use 1/4" shank Whiteside router bits and they are more than up to the task. Edge profiles, dados and through slots in 3/4" Jatoba are all easily accomplished with the 1010. I've also routed key slots for clamps in 80/20 aluminum tubes without an issue.

Here are some pics:
Dado for cabinet back in 3/4" maple ply
Slots in Jatoba for HVAC vents
Clamp slot in 80/20

those HVAC vents are really, really nice...awesome work!!

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Re: Which router
« Reply #55 on: October 07, 2017, 02:05 PM »
Thanks 🙏 🙏 Scott.

And thank you 🙏 MFS.

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Re: Which router
« Reply #56 on: October 07, 2017, 02:55 PM »
One more photo I ran across while cleaning out my phone today.

Again, I used the 1010 with a 1/2" diameter bit on a 1/4" diameter shank to relieve the 3/4" oak drawer front for cast aluminum pulls. 

Offline mclaeys

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Re: Which router
« Reply #57 on: October 10, 2017, 04:20 PM »
for those that can't decide between the 1010 and 1400 and wrestle with not wanting buying more tool then they need, or  spending a bit more and go for the generalist model. I personally ended up with the 1010 and found the main production issue that you have to accept is not the size of the bits available, but based on the work needed to do, the length of the 1/8" bits. in boring holes, slots and and templating work you can only work on 3/4 material.

I've never seen in this forum this fact. perhaps it's widely understood what the limitations of 1/8 bits are in producing work and why it can be logically to buy 1400 because your not sure what work you may be doing in the future.
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Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: Which router
« Reply #58 on: October 10, 2017, 05:55 PM »
for those that can't decide between the 1010 and 1400 and wrestle with not wanting buying more tool then they need, or  spending a bit more and go for the generalist model. I personally ended up with the 1010 and found the main production issue that you have to accept is not the size of the bits available, but based on the work needed to do, the length of the 1/8" bits. in boring holes, slots and and templating work you can only work on 3/4 material.

I've never seen in this forum this fact. perhaps it's widely understood what the limitations of 1/8 bits are in producing work and why it can be logically to buy 1400 because your not sure what work you may be doing in the future.

I doubt 1/8" bits with 1/2" shanks would be any longer...

Offline Steven Owen

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Re: Which router
« Reply #59 on: October 11, 2017, 11:22 AM »
I think the 1400 is too pretty a router to bury under a router table especially when a PC motor and a lift does a better job at a cheaper price.
And me MUCH more powerful! There is nothing better than the Porter Cable 7518 in a nice Incra, Woodpeckers, Benchdog, etc lift in a good solid cast iron router table top and steel stand! I love it!

Porter Cable’s reliability has not been the same since they were bought out by Stanley Black & Decker.  I would say the Milwaukee 5625-20 has become the new de-facto king of the router tables.  In a Incra Lift, it can hold it’s own against a OF 2200 in a Router Table set-up. 

A router table seems like a waste for an OF 2200.  If you’re going to pay that much for an OF2200, it should be getting used for heavy duty freehand tasks.