Author Topic: lets design the next track saw  (Read 13135 times)

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Offline Brice Burrell

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Re: lets design the next track saw
« Reply #30 on: March 27, 2012, 12:49 PM »
A slightly longer standard guide rail. The 1400 guide rail isn't long enough to cross cut a 4x8 sheet of plywood without the guide gibs coming off the rail.

The 1400 rail will work, you just need to plunge the saw at the beginning of the cut.  I do agree a longer rail is good idea, I'm thinking a 1500 or 1600 rail would be much better.
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Offline andvari

  • Posts: 423
Re: lets design the next track saw
« Reply #31 on: March 27, 2012, 03:51 PM »
A slightly longer standard guide rail. The 1400 guide rail isn't long enough to cross cut a 4x8 sheet of plywood without the guide gibs coming off the rail.

The 1400 rail will work, you just need to plunge the saw at the beginning of the cut.  I do agree a longer rail is good idea, I'm thinking a 1500 or 1600 rail would be much better.

Yes, that's what I have been doing. The problem with that is that you get a bit of a kickback when you plunge, and there isn't space for the stop, or the cord/hose guides on the end of the rail in this application. It may be a bit picky but this is a Festool so I feel entitled to be this way about it.

The more I think about it the more I think the 75" rail should be standard with this saw.


« Last Edit: March 27, 2012, 03:56 PM by andvari »
TS55, Domino 500, Domino Assortment, OF1400, CT36+Boom Arm, T12+3, FS3000, Parallel Guides, RO 90, ETS 150/3, Domino XL, Domiplate, LS130, RTS Guide Stop, CMS-GE, Carvex 420

Offline jmbfestool

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Re: lets design the next track saw
« Reply #32 on: March 27, 2012, 07:05 PM »
How about laser lines that dynamically adjust to the depth of the plunge and mark where the front and the back end of the blade run at any given plunge depth?

This would blast away the static markings on the side of the saw (like Mafell has) that define where the blades extents are at full depth plunge while doing holes in the middle of a table top.

Yeah I like that idea!!!!   You set the depth of your blade and the lasers automatically adjust  so you know when you plunge your blade where it starts and ends! 

... Im liking tha idea!!!

JMB
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Offline Captainwrinkles

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Re: lets design the next track saw
« Reply #33 on: March 27, 2012, 07:27 PM »
I'd like an exact opposite of the saw ( a mirror image of the current ts55r) i.e. a saw that slides down the track the other way. A few times that would have come in really handy (like trimming the side of a countertop that had a solid edge on the front). And also being right handed, it might make it easier for me to use.

Offline andvari

  • Posts: 423
Re: lets design the next track saw
« Reply #34 on: June 10, 2012, 06:27 PM »
Continuation of my theme that the 1400mm rail is too short for basic use, today I went to cut down a 4' wide sheet of plywood into shelving using the parallel guides.

The 1400mm rail is too short for this purpose! You cannot get both of the outside brass screws on the rail if you have a 4' wide piece of wood between the rails. And it's close too. Another inch and it would work.

I ended up dragging out my 3000mm rail - but there really shouldn't have been a need to do that. 

TS55, Domino 500, Domino Assortment, OF1400, CT36+Boom Arm, T12+3, FS3000, Parallel Guides, RO 90, ETS 150/3, Domino XL, Domiplate, LS130, RTS Guide Stop, CMS-GE, Carvex 420

Offline jmbfestool

  • Posts: 6625
Re: lets design the next track saw
« Reply #35 on: June 10, 2012, 06:30 PM »
Continuation of my theme that the 1400mm rail is too short for basic use, today I went to cut down a 4' wide sheet of plywood into shelving using the parallel guides.

The 1400mm rail is too short for this purpose! You cannot get both of the outside brass screws on the rail if you have a 4' wide piece of wood between the rails. And it's close too. Another inch and it would work.

I ended up dragging out my 3000mm rail - but there really shouldn't have been a need to do that. 



I wish it was the same length as the Mafell rail which comes with the saw! When using the Mafell saw for a little bit I found the extra length rail was really handy but didnt cause any inconvenience due to it being slightly longer.  So I dont see why festool dont make it 100mm or 200 mm longer. 

JMB
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Offline Chris Wong

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Re: lets design the next track saw
« Reply #36 on: June 10, 2012, 09:25 PM »
2. Using your CT vac to create suction on the rail so no clamps need for certain applications.  Once you stop cutting vac shuts down and rail can be lifted off

JMB

The only problem with this is that, assuming that the TS controls the vacuum, you need to align the rail, then turn on the saw without bumping the rail.  I think that a vacuum-clamping rail would be better with a separate on/off vacuum switch.
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Offline fdengel

  • Posts: 854
Re: lets design the next track saw
« Reply #37 on: June 11, 2012, 07:49 AM »
One problem with plunge cuts using a circular blade is that the width of the cut (front to back) changes with depth, making it hard to accurately place the saw for the start and end of the cut... plus the surface the saw/track sits on will be cut further than the bottom surface, so if you try cutting a square out from the middle of a piece, assuming you somehow manage to place the saw correctly, either the top will be cut further than the edges of the square, or the bottom will need additional cuts to be made to finish taking the square out.

How can we resolve these deficiencies?

That might make a saw worthy of upgrading to...

Offline ama

  • Posts: 21
Re: lets design the next track saw
« Reply #38 on: August 03, 2012, 05:16 PM »
maybe the next ts caould tilt in wards so that the weight is still over the rail.

Don't forget that you need to pivot around the bottom of the strip if you want the nice right-on-your-pencil-line cut that we all know and love. Tilting the saw inwards would cut into the strip. How does the R manage its -1 degree?

Offline Alan m

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Re: lets design the next track saw
« Reply #39 on: August 03, 2012, 06:45 PM »
maybe the next ts caould tilt in wards so that the weight is still over the rail.

Don't forget that you need to pivot around the bottom of the strip if you want the nice right-on-your-pencil-line cut that we all know and love. Tilting the saw inwards would cut into the strip. How does the R manage its -1 degree?

thats a good question. i never thought about it. it must move the bottom of the blade away or something. or maybe we just dont notice it.
tilting inwards should work. it is only the botom edge of the splinter guards that we need, if the top is angled in from cutting it shouldnt matter. althow it might weaken the strip reducing the ability to stop chips. probably need a stronger stripping
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