Author Topic: Cerused oak  (Read 3750 times)

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Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 267
Cerused oak
« on: May 26, 2016, 12:15 AM »
I'm making new legs for my bed and using some scrap red oak for stock.   I've got everything glued up, cut, planed, and ready for finishing.  So far, I've put one coat of oil on them.  Looks nice - lots of flecking and rays.

I was thinking about spicing things up a bit, and doing a cerused finish - but what to use?

I was thinking I could do the following:

1 more coat of oil
Coat of sanding sealer
Fill pores with something white (plaster?  white paint?)
Remove white stuff from non-pores
Coat or two of shellac/lacquer.

I've never done a cerused finish before, so I'd be interested to know what other folks do.

-Adam

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Offline JD2720

  • Posts: 1028
Re: Cerused oak
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2016, 06:04 AM »
After 2 coats of oil & a coat of sanding sealer, will any of the pores still be open to take the color?

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5760
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Cerused oak
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2016, 07:28 AM »
I'm not sure show the oil will affect the process, normally sanding sealer for the barrier coat.

Liming paste or wax is the white stuff.

Make a few test pieces.

Tom

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3532
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Cerused oak
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2016, 10:21 AM »
I am working on some cabinetry and wall paneling with cerused Oak.
I am using General RTM stains with the RTM white for the "cerused" effect.
After using a wire brush and vacuuming it clean, I raise the gain with a spray of distilled water and sand to 120. Then I box coat my stain mixture and seal with 75% Target EM 1000 sealer and water.
I sand this at 400/350 grit. and then brush on and wipe off the General White stain, which is essentially a white wash. I then sand again at 350-400 to remove the haze. Seal and spray with a poly satin.

I have attached a picture of the final approved sample.


Make a few test pieces.

I agree with Tom, make sample pieces first. I made about a dozen samples to get to the one below.


After 2 coats of oil & a coat of sanding sealer, will any of the pores still be open to take the color?

I used a stainless steel brush and then vacummed to deepen the gain in the red oak. Stainless steel so any wire that broke off wouldn't react with the water bourne stain. For production I bought a Makita wheel sander

Tim


Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 4010
Re: Cerused oak
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2016, 11:12 AM »
So essentially a big stainless toothbrush ?

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 267
Re: Cerused oak
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2016, 10:26 PM »
Thanks, Tom. 

I'm not sure, either.   Usually I've seen a dark stain, sanding sealer, then the lighter material to fill the pores.

I did a couple test pieces.  I don't know if they really worked well with the room.  Guess it's a good thing I tested first!

-Adam


I'm not sure show the oil will affect the process, normally sanding sealer for the barrier coat.

Liming paste or wax is the white stuff.

Make a few test pieces.

Tom

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 267
Re: Cerused oak
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2016, 10:29 PM »

Interesting effect.   You used a white stain for the pores?   I had also read of folks using white paint.  Others mentioned joint compound.

I did make a couple samples and I wasn't completely sold on it - I don't think it's the right look for that space.  Still, it's a good technique to have in the toolkit.

-Adam




I am working on some cabinetry and wall paneling with cerused Oak.
I am using General RTM stains with the RTM white for the "cerused" effect.
After using a wire brush and vacuuming it clean, I raise the gain with a spray of distilled water and sand to 120. Then I box coat my stain mixture and seal with 75% Target EM 1000 sealer and water.
I sand this at 400/350 grit. and then brush on and wipe off the General White stain, which is essentially a white wash. I then sand again at 350-400 to remove the haze. Seal and spray with a poly satin.

I have attached a picture of the final approved sample.


Make a few test pieces.

I agree with Tom, make sample pieces first. I made about a dozen samples to get to the one below.


After 2 coats of oil & a coat of sanding sealer, will any of the pores still be open to take the color?

I used a stainless steel brush and then vacummed to deepen the gain in the red oak. Stainless steel so any wire that broke off wouldn't react with the water bourne stain. For production I bought a Makita wheel sander

Tim



Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3532
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Cerused oak
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2016, 12:27 PM »
You used a white stain for the pores?

Yes, essentially a white wash just thinned white paint really. I don't want to completely fill the pores/grain.
Tim

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3532
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Cerused oak
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2016, 12:35 PM »
So essentially a big stainless toothbrush ?

Yep!  [wink]