Author Topic: scuffed up laminated worktop.  (Read 4652 times)

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Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3302
scuffed up laminated worktop.
« on: June 13, 2012, 06:57 PM »
hi there.
i have a scuffed up gloss worktop on a job. i installed it last year. home owner wouldnt listen at the time and wanted gloss
it isnt that old so i would rather not have to buy a new one. there was some demo work done there recently and its scuffed it up .
nothing serious. a few scratchs but they will never come out .  there are a few areas that are a but dull and some with fine scrathchs that i think will polish out.
i have a ro9- and 150 so i was thinking of some kind of auto polish  or something for corian.
i have an offcut in the shop somewhere . i could scuff that the same maybe and then try to fix it.

anyone got any advice

thanks alan
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5618
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: scuffed up laminated worktop.
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2012, 07:16 PM »
You call it a laminated top. Is it high pressure laminate or built up wood?

If it is finished wood. Wet sand from 6000 to 12,000. Pumice then rottenstone. From there liquid polishes. Cleaner wax has slight abrasives in it so you can try that also.

Pictures of the damage would really help. Also can you catch the "scratches" with a finger nail?

Tom


Offline mastercabman

  • Posts: 1854
  • NORFOLK,VA
Re: scuffed up laminated worktop.
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2012, 09:14 PM »
I think he is talking about laminate.
Not much you can do.You can try buffing it,i did this a couple of times.It help a little.
Or you could sand the whole thing down with some very fine grit and give it a matte finish [laughing]
And just say to the homeowner,  It's the new look baby! [laughing]
I don't understand!?! I keep cutting it,and it's still too short!

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7651
Re: scuffed up laminated worktop.
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2012, 05:05 AM »
From the Corian website ...

Removing fine scratches or a blotchy appearance

You may notice that the surface of your countertop begins to look blotchy. Typically, this is caused by leaving hard water to dry on the surface which will leave a film of minerals. To remove this film:
Pour some mild abrasive liquid cleanser, such as Soft Scrub®, on a damp sponge or cloth and rub over area using small circular motions, from the front to the back, then side to side, overlapping the circles until the entire area has been cleaned.
Thoroughly rinse the top with clean water and WIPE SURFACE COMPLETELY DRY.
Check to see if blotchiness is gone. If not, repeat procedure applying more pressure on the sponge or rag.
Continue over all affected areas until all film is removed.
NOTE: While this procedure may remove or minimize the look of very fine scratches, other deeper scratches may remain. They may be removed by following the procedure below or you may with to hire a professional refinisher to refinish your countertop. Contact your Corian® Retailer or DuPont to arrange for professional refinishing.

Removing minor cuts and scratches*

Because the solid beauty of Corian® goes all the way through, Corian® surfaces are renewable. You can remove minor cuts and scratches yourself by following these instructions.
First, wash the area where the scratch is located, following the instructions found in this guide, to remove any film on the surface as this film may clog the abrasive pads. With this surface still wet, start rubbing with the Peach colored side of the cleaning pad. Use a light touch. Pressing too hard may actually leave deeper scratches. Rub over the scratch using a straight line motion. Periodically switch rubbing direction ninety degrees. Rinse pad periodically during this process to remove any built up residue. Be sure all of the scratch is removed.
Clean top with water and dry thoroughly. Check to see if sanded area blends with rest of top. Please note that sanded area may not perfectly match remainder of top. If necessary, turn pad over and repeat process. Rub over large area to blend in sanding.
If needed, continue the sanding process using the Aqua colored pad and if necessary, the Gray colored pad until the desired gloss level is achieved.
Rinse out all pads used and allow them to air dry before putting them away.
An alternative to your refinishing your countertop, is to contact your Corian® retailer or DuPont to arrange for professional refinishing.

Sources for materials mentioned above:

Abrasive pads
Micro-Surface Finishing Products, Inc.
(800) 225-3006
Countertop Magic®
Magic America Corp.
(800) 321-6330
Clean EnCounters®
SCI (800) 839-1654 or The Home Depot
Deep Cleaner for DuPont Corian®
SCI (800) 839-1654 or The Home Depot
Enhance Countertop Polish
EMS – (800) 643-8818
Green Scotch-Brite®
Local supermarket or hardware store
Hope’s Countertop Polish
The Hope Co. (800) 325-4026
SoftScrub®
Local supermarket

Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3302
Re: scuffed up laminated worktop.
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2012, 05:42 AM »
sorry plastic laminate
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7651
Re: scuffed up laminated worktop.
« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2012, 05:51 AM »
sorry plastic laminate

I'd tackle that by hand. Rough up your spare piece and try something like a medium duco scratch removing paste. Then probably lightly buff in a wax polish.

Biggest potential problem could be food safety ... the surface won't be as durable afterwards either.

Kev.

Offline andvari

  • Posts: 423
Re: scuffed up laminated worktop.
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2012, 08:22 AM »
sorry plastic laminate

I think Corian is a solid piece of plastic, not a laminate.

Here's a vid.




« Last Edit: June 14, 2012, 08:35 AM by andvari »
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Offline woodguy7

  • Posts: 2727
Re: scuffed up laminated worktop.
« Reply #7 on: June 14, 2012, 08:58 AM »
That guy taking the video was a doofus  [huh]

Can't say I was impressed with that demo but I'm sure if the guy was given more time & a decent sander to work with he would have done better  [smile]
If its made of wood, i can make it smaller.
Shirt size medium
p.s- ive started reading these too

Offline Davej

  • Posts: 630
Re: scuffed up laminated worktop.
« Reply #8 on: June 14, 2012, 03:58 PM »
The layers that make up plastic laminate are very very thin and even very fine sanding could destroy the finish and the colour coat under it , you would be better to contact the manufacturer of the laminate itself and seek their advice as some laminates do have repair kits for them , good luck
I dont mind growing old but i refuse to grow up

Offline Greg Lock

  • Posts: 13
Re: scuffed up laminated worktop.
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2012, 05:25 PM »
Hi
 If it is a high pressure laminate then forget it. The laminate is made from paper sheets soaked in resin and basically cooked with a top colour/light texture embossed coat. It is also very, very thin and repairs will most likely increase the damage.
 I once inset a piece of timber into a damaged area and it was used to place pans on!